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Open AccessReview

The Color of Health: Residential Segregation, Light Rail Transit Developments, and Gentrification in the United States

1
School of Architecture and Environmental Design, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16846-13114, Iran
2
Department of Kinesiology, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3683; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193683
Received: 22 August 2019 / Revised: 25 September 2019 / Accepted: 26 September 2019 / Published: 30 September 2019
As the modern urban–suburban context becomes increasingly problematic with traffic congestion, air pollution, and increased cost of living, city planners are turning their attention to transit-oriented development as a strategy to promote healthy communities. Transit-oriented developments bring valuable resources and improvements in infrastructure, but they also may be reinforcing decades-old processes of residential segregation, gentrification, and displacement of low-income residents and communities of color. Careful consideration of zoning, neighborhood design, and affordability is vital to mitigating the impacts of transit-induced gentrification, a socioeconomic by-product of transit-oriented development whereby the provision of transit service “upscales” nearby neighborhood(s) and displaces existing community members with more affluent and often White residents. To date, the available research and, thus, overall understanding of transit-induced gentrification and the related social determinants of health are limited and mixed. In this review, an overview of racial residential segregation, light rail transit developments, and gentrification in the United States has been provided. Implications for future transit-oriented developments are also presented along with a discussion of possible solutions. View Full-Text
Keywords: residential segregation; transit-oriented development; transit-induced gentrification; social determinants of health; physical and mental health outcomes residential segregation; transit-oriented development; transit-induced gentrification; social determinants of health; physical and mental health outcomes
MDPI and ACS Style

Tehrani, S.O.; Wu, S.J.; Roberts, J.D. The Color of Health: Residential Segregation, Light Rail Transit Developments, and Gentrification in the United States. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3683.

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