Next Article in Journal
Study on the Use of Cooking Oil in Chinese Dishes
Previous Article in Journal
Air Pollution and Preterm Birth: Do Air Pollution Changes over Time Influence Risk in Consecutive Pregnancies among Low-Risk Women?
Open AccessArticle

Burden of Lesser-Known Unintentional Non-Fatal Injuries in Rural Bangladesh: Findings from a Large-Scale Population-Based Study

1
MPH 2019 Graduate, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; 615 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
2
International Injury Research Unit, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
3
Center for Injury Prevention and Research, Bangladesh, House B 162, Rd No. 23, Dhaka 1206, Bangladesh
4
International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh, 68, Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sarani Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3366; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183366
Received: 9 July 2019 / Revised: 9 September 2019 / Accepted: 11 September 2019 / Published: 12 September 2019
Around 90% of all fatal and non-fatal unintentional injuries occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The magnitude of unintentional injuries is unclear due to limited research and data. This paper describes the burden of lesser-known injuries (LKIs—cut injuries, unintentional poisoning, machine injuries, electrocution, injury by blunt objects, and suffocation) in rural Bangladesh, using data from the Saving of Lives from Drowning (SoLiD) project in Bangladesh. Descriptive statistics were used to report counts and rates of injuries by socio-demographic factors, injury characteristics, and circumstantial details. The annual morbidity rate of LKIs was 6878 injuries per 100,000 persons, involving 3.4% (40,520) of the population. Cut injury (44,131.2/100,000 per year) and injury by blunt objects (19768.6/100,000 per year) attributed in large numbers to the overall burden of LKIs. Males (66.1%) suffered more injuries than females. More than half (52.9%) occurred among people aged 25 to 64 years. Those involved in agriculture suffered the most injuries, mainly cut injuries (9234.1/100,000 per year) and machine-related injuries (582.9/100,000 per year). Most injuries occurred in the home setting. Increased awareness about packaging, storage, and the proper handling of appliances can help lower the frequency of LKIs. Safe architecture and awareness about home injuries is required to reduce injuries occurring in the home environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: cut injuries; unintentional poisoning; machine injuries; injury by blunt objects; Bangladesh cut injuries; unintentional poisoning; machine injuries; injury by blunt objects; Bangladesh
MDPI and ACS Style

Ashraf, L.; Agrawal, P.; Rahman, A.; Salam, S.S.; Li, Q. Burden of Lesser-Known Unintentional Non-Fatal Injuries in Rural Bangladesh: Findings from a Large-Scale Population-Based Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3366. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183366

AMA Style

Ashraf L, Agrawal P, Rahman A, Salam SS, Li Q. Burden of Lesser-Known Unintentional Non-Fatal Injuries in Rural Bangladesh: Findings from a Large-Scale Population-Based Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(18):3366. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183366

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ashraf, Lamisa; Agrawal, Priyanka; Rahman, Aminur; Salam, Shumona S.; Li, Qingfeng. 2019. "Burden of Lesser-Known Unintentional Non-Fatal Injuries in Rural Bangladesh: Findings from a Large-Scale Population-Based Study" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 18: 3366. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183366

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop