Next Article in Journal
Spatial Video Health Risk Mapping in Informal Settlements: Correcting GPS Error
Next Article in Special Issue
Protocol for the Development of a Food Stress Index to Identify Households Most at Risk of Food Insecurity in Western Australia
Previous Article in Journal
Is Patient-Provider Racial Concordance Associated with Hispanics’ Satisfaction with Health Care?
Previous Article in Special Issue
Testing the Price of Healthy and Current Diets in Remote Aboriginal Communities to Improve Food Security: Development of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healthy Diets ASAP (Australian Standardised Affordability and Pricing) Methods
Open AccessArticle

Food Reference Budgets as a Potential Policy Tool to Address Food Insecurity: Lessons Learned from a Pilot Study in 26 European Countries

1
Blanquerna School of Health Sciences—Universitat Ramon Llull-Global Research on Wellbeing—GRoW Research group, Padilla, 08025 Barcelona, Spain
2
Research Foundation—Flanders, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy—University of Antwerp, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium
3
Thomas More Kempen, 2440 Malle, Belgium
4
Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy—University of Antwerp, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium
5
Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School and Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6ED, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(1), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010032
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 8 December 2018 / Accepted: 14 December 2018 / Published: 24 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addressing Food and Nutrition Security in Developed Countries)
The aim of this article is to present the development of cross-country comparable food reference budgets in 26 European countries, and to discuss their usefulness as an addition to food-based dietary guidelines (FBDG) for tackling food insecurity in low-income groups. Reference budgets are illustrative priced baskets containing the minimum goods and services necessary for well-described types of families to have an adequate social participation. This study was conducted starting from national FBDG, which were translated into monthly food baskets. Next, these baskets were validated in terms of their acceptability and feasibility through focus group discussions, and finally they were priced. Along the paper, we show how that food reference budgets hold interesting contributions to the promotion of healthy eating and prevention of food insecurity in low-income contexts in at least four ways: (1) they show how a healthy diet can be achieved with limited economic resources, (2) they bring closer to the citizen a detailed example of how to put FBDG recommendations into practice, (3) they ensure that food security is achieved in an integral way, by comprising the biological but also psychological and social functions of food, and (4) providing routes for further (comparative) research into food insecurity. View Full-Text
Keywords: reference budgets; food insecurity; cost of a healthy diet; Food-based dietary guidelines reference budgets; food insecurity; cost of a healthy diet; Food-based dietary guidelines
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Carrillo-Álvarez, E.; Penne, T.; Boeckx, H.; Storms, B.; Goedemé, T. Food Reference Budgets as a Potential Policy Tool to Address Food Insecurity: Lessons Learned from a Pilot Study in 26 European Countries. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 32.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop