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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 1813; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15091813

Is the Institutional Environment a Challenge for the Well-Being of Female Managers in Europe? The Mediating Effect of Work–Life Balance and Role Clarity Practices in the Workplace

1
Department of Business Administration, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Juan de Quesada, 30, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
2
Department of Business Management, Universidad Loyola Andalucía, 14004 Cordoba, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 July 2018 / Revised: 16 August 2018 / Accepted: 19 August 2018 / Published: 22 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Health Promotion 2018)
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Abstract

The advancement of women to top management positions positively affects firm competitiveness. However, this advancement may also negatively affect individuals as women find themselves forced to overwork to match their male counterparts in organisations, which can cause a decrease in their professional well-being. Although the literature highlights that human resource practices (HRPs) have a positive impact on well-being, it also warns that national institutions may condition the adoption of HRPs by organisations. If that is true, institutions may become either a challenge to—or trigger for—female managers’ well-being. Accordingly, this study analyses the effects of institutions and the mediating effects of HRPs on the influence that is exerted by institutions on well-being. The empirical analysis, which was carried out on a sample of 575 female managers located in 27 European countries, confirms the direct and indirect effects (through HRPs for work–life balance and role clarity) of institutions on female managers’ well-being at work. View Full-Text
Keywords: employee well-being; human resource practices; institutional theory; female managers; European countries employee well-being; human resource practices; institutional theory; female managers; European countries
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Cuéllar-Molina, D.; García-Cabrera, A.M.; Lucia-Casademunt, A.M. Is the Institutional Environment a Challenge for the Well-Being of Female Managers in Europe? The Mediating Effect of Work–Life Balance and Role Clarity Practices in the Workplace. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1813.

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