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Open AccessArticle

Body Weight Misperception and Its Association with Unhealthy Eating Behaviors among Adolescents in China

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School of Health Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China
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Cerus Consulting, LLC, Winston-Salem, NC 27101, USA
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Abt Associates, Durham, NC 27703, USA
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College of Life Sciences, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan 430074, China
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Department of Nutrition, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
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Department of Family & Community Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
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Department of Epidemiology & Prevention, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
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Department of Implementation Science, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 936; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15050936
Received: 5 March 2018 / Revised: 28 April 2018 / Accepted: 4 May 2018 / Published: 8 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Health Behavior and Public Health)
This study aims to examine associations between body weight misperception and eating behaviors among Chinese adolescents. Students (N = 2641) from a middle school and a high school in Wuhan, China participated in a cross-sectional study in May 2016. A questionnaire based on the World Health Organization’s Global School-Based Student Health Survey was employed to assess responses. Self-reported data, including weight, height, body weight perception, and eating habits, were collected. Body Mass Index (BMI) for age z-score was calculated from self-reported height and weight using WHO AnthroPlus. We used descriptive, logistic regression analysis and a Kappa test to analyze the data using SPSS. Overall, 56.6% of participants did not correctly categorize their weight status; these were much more likely to be girls. Compared with the correctly-perceived group, those who underestimated their weight tended to report eating late at night, having dinners with family, and checking nutrition labels. In contrast, weight overestimating students were less likely to report eating late at night, having breakfasts with family, having dinners with family, and discussing nutrition topics over meals. Body weight misperception was associated with unhealthy eating behaviors among Chinese adolescents. View Full-Text
Keywords: body weight misperception; unhealthy eating behaviors; adolescents body weight misperception; unhealthy eating behaviors; adolescents
MDPI and ACS Style

Yan, H.; Wu, Y.; Oniffrey, T.; Brinkley, J.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Wang, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, R.; Moore, J.B. Body Weight Misperception and Its Association with Unhealthy Eating Behaviors among Adolescents in China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 936.

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