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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 230; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020230

Ventilation Positive Pressure Intervention Effect on Indoor Air Quality in a School Building with Moisture Problems

1
Department of Civil Engineering, Aalto University, Rakentajanaukio 4, 02150 Espoo, Finland
2
Department of Microbiology, University of Szeged, Közép Fasor 52, H-6726 Szeged, Hungary
3
Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn, Estonia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 26 January 2018 / Accepted: 27 January 2018 / Published: 30 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Quality and Health)
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Abstract

This case study investigates the effects of ventilation intervention on measured and perceived indoor air quality (IAQ) in a repaired school where occupants reported IAQ problems. Occupants’ symptoms were suspected to be related to the impurities leaked indoors through the building envelope. The study’s aim was to determine whether a positive pressure of 5–7 Pa prevents the infiltration of harmful chemical and microbiological agents from structures, thus decreasing symptoms and discomfort. Ventilation intervention was conducted in a building section comprising 12 classrooms and was completed with IAQ measurements and occupants’ questionnaires. After intervention, the concentration of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) decreased, and occupants’ negative perceptions became more moderate compared to those for other parts of the building. The indoor mycobiota differed in species composition from the outdoor mycobiota, and changed remarkably with the intervention, indicating that some species may have emanated from an indoor source before the intervention. View Full-Text
Keywords: ventilation; positive pressure; indoor air quality; mycobiota; indoor air questionnaire; moisture damage ventilation; positive pressure; indoor air quality; mycobiota; indoor air questionnaire; moisture damage
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Vornanen-Winqvist, C.; Järvi, K.; Toomla, S.; Ahmed, K.; Andersson, M.A.; Mikkola, R.; Marik, T.; Kredics, L.; Salonen, H.; Kurnitski, J. Ventilation Positive Pressure Intervention Effect on Indoor Air Quality in a School Building with Moisture Problems. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 230.

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