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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(8), 881; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14080881

Comparison of Metabolic Syndrome Indicators in Two Samples of Central and South Americans Living in the Washington, D.C. Area in 1993–1994 and 2008–2009: Secular Changes in Metabolic Syndrome in Hispanics

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740, USA
2
Department of Family Science, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20007, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 May 2017 / Revised: 21 July 2017 / Accepted: 1 August 2017 / Published: 5 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
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Abstract

The Central and South American populations are growing rapidly in the US; however, there is a paucity of information about their health status. Objectives: we estimated the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components from two cohorts of Central and South Americans. Methods: This cross-sectional, medical record extraction survey sampled 1641 adults from a Washington, D.C clinic. A questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic, medical history, anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical data. Results: among the 1993–1994 cohort, the MetS prevalence was 19.7%. The most prevalent MetS components were low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (40.4% men and 51.3% women), elevated triglycerides (40.9% men and 33.1% women), and high body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2 (27.6% men and 36.6% women). The overall prevalence of MetS in the 2008–2009 cohort was 28%. The most common abnormal metabolic indicator was an elevated BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (75.6%). 43.2% of men and 50.7% of women had HDL levels below normal, while the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia was 46.5% and 32.5% for men and women, respectively. Conclusion: the prevalence of MetS was significantly greater in 2008–2009 compared with 1993–1994 (p ≤ 0.05). Dyslipidemia and high BMI have increased. Although similar components were identified in both the 1993–1994 and 2008–2009 study populations, the risks of MetS have increased over time. View Full-Text
Keywords: central and South Americans adults; understudied groups; metabolic syndrome; obesity; heart disease; diabetes; epidemiology central and South Americans adults; understudied groups; metabolic syndrome; obesity; heart disease; diabetes; epidemiology
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Gill, R.; Jackson, R.T.; Duane, M.; Miner, A.; Khan, S.A. Comparison of Metabolic Syndrome Indicators in Two Samples of Central and South Americans Living in the Washington, D.C. Area in 1993–1994 and 2008–2009: Secular Changes in Metabolic Syndrome in Hispanics. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 881.

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