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The Effects of Industrial Protective Gloves and Hand Skin Temperatures on Hand Grip Strength and Discomfort Rating

1
Industrial Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, King Saud University, P.O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421, Saudi Arabia
2
Raytheon Chair for Systems Engineering (RCSE), Advanced Manufacturing Institute, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421, Saudi Arabia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(12), 1506; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121506
Received: 29 October 2017 / Revised: 27 November 2017 / Accepted: 1 December 2017 / Published: 4 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Occupational Safety and Health)
Daily working activities and functions require a high contribution of hand and forearm muscles in executing grip force. To study the effects of wearing different gloves on grip strength, under a variety of hand skin temperatures, an assessment of the maximum grip strength was performed with 32 healthy male workers with a mean age (standard deviation) of 30.44 (5.35) years wearing five industrial gloves at three hand skin temperatures. Their ages and anthropometric characteristics including body mass index (BMI), hand length, hand width, hand depth, hand palm, and wrist circumference were measured. The hand was exposed to different bath temperatures (5 °C, 25 °C, and 45 °C) and hand grip strength was measured using a Jamar hydraulic hand dynamometer with and without wearing the gloves (chemical protection glove, rubber insulating glove, anti-vibration impact glove, cotton yarn knitted glove, and RY-WG002 working glove). The data were analyzed using the Shapiro–Wilk test, Pearson correlation coefficient, Tukey test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the within-subject design analysis. The results showed that wearing gloves significantly affected the maximum grip strength. Wearing the RY-WG002 working glove produced a greater reduction on the maximum grip when compared with the bare hand, while low temperatures (5 °C) had a significant influence on grip when compared to medium (25 °C) and high (45 °C) hand skin temperatures. In addition, participants felt more discomfort in both environmental extreme conditions. Furthermore, they reported more discomfort while wearing neoprene, rubber, and RY-WG002 working gloves. View Full-Text
Keywords: hand grip strength; muscles; ergonomics; Jamar dynamometer; maximal effort; hand force assessment; subjective rating hand grip strength; muscles; ergonomics; Jamar dynamometer; maximal effort; hand force assessment; subjective rating
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ramadan, M.Z. The Effects of Industrial Protective Gloves and Hand Skin Temperatures on Hand Grip Strength and Discomfort Rating. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1506. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121506

AMA Style

Ramadan MZ. The Effects of Industrial Protective Gloves and Hand Skin Temperatures on Hand Grip Strength and Discomfort Rating. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2017; 14(12):1506. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121506

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ramadan, Mohamed Z. 2017. "The Effects of Industrial Protective Gloves and Hand Skin Temperatures on Hand Grip Strength and Discomfort Rating" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14, no. 12: 1506. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121506

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