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Open AccessArticle

Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

by 1,2,* and 3
1
School of Health Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology, SE-37971 Karlskrona, Sweden
2
Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, SE-20506 Malmö, Sweden
3
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(1), 1161-1175; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph110101161
Received: 11 October 2013 / Revised: 13 January 2014 / Accepted: 13 January 2014 / Published: 20 January 2014
The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: mental health care; nursing staff; psychosocial work environment; questionnaire; stress; troubled conscience mental health care; nursing staff; psychosocial work environment; questionnaire; stress; troubled conscience
MDPI and ACS Style

Hanna, T.; Mona, E. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 1161-1175.

AMA Style

Hanna T, Mona E. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2014; 11(1):1161-1175.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hanna, Tuvesson; Mona, Eklund. 2014. "Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 11, no. 1: 1161-1175.

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