Next Article in Journal
Motion Analysis of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex by Using Ultrasonography Images: Preliminary Analysis
Next Article in Special Issue
Role of Knee and Ankle Extensors’ Muscle-Tendon Properties in Dynamic Balance Recovery from a Simulated Slip
Previous Article in Journal
Low-Rank and Sparse Matrix Recovery for Hyperspectral Image Reconstruction Using Bayesian Learning
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Simplified Method for Considering Achilles Tendon Curvature in the Assessment of Tendon Elongation
Article

Head-Mounted and Hand-Held Displays Diminish the Effectiveness of Fall-Resisting Skills

1
Sport and Exercise Science Research Centre, School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University, London SE1 0AA, UK
2
Department of Mathematics and Technology, University of Applied Sciences Koblenz, 53424 Remagen, Germany
3
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the German Social Accident Insurance (IFA), 53757 Sankt Augustin, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Emiliano Schena
Sensors 2022, 22(1), 344; https://doi.org/10.3390/s22010344
Received: 30 November 2021 / Revised: 23 December 2021 / Accepted: 28 December 2021 / Published: 4 January 2022
Use of head-mounted displays (HMDs) and hand-held displays (HHDs) may affect the effectiveness of stability control mechanisms and impair resistance to falls. This study aimed to examine whether the ability to control stability during locomotion is diminished while using HMDs and HHDs. Fourteen healthy adults (21–46 years) were assessed under single-task (no display) and dual-task (spatial 2-n-back presented on the HMD or the HHD) conditions while performing various locomotor tasks. An optical motion capture system and two force plates were used to assess locomotor stability using an inverted pendulum model. For perturbed standing, 57% of the participants were not able to maintain stability by counter-rotation actions when using either display, compared to the single-task condition. Furthermore, around 80% of participants (dual-task) compared to 50% (single-task) showed a negative margin of stability (i.e., an unstable body configuration) during recovery for perturbed walking due to a diminished ability to increase their base of support effectively. However, no evidence was found for HMDs or HHDs affecting stability during unperturbed locomotion. In conclusion, additional cognitive resources required for dual-tasking, using either display, are suggested to result in delayed response execution for perturbed standing and walking, consequently diminishing participants’ ability to use stability control mechanisms effectively and increasing the risk of falls. View Full-Text
Keywords: smart glasses; head-mounted displays; hand-held displays; gait perturbation; stability control mechanisms; falls smart glasses; head-mounted displays; hand-held displays; gait perturbation; stability control mechanisms; falls
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Weber, A.; Werth, J.; Epro, G.; Friemert, D.; Hartmann, U.; Lambrianides, Y.; Seeley, J.; Nickel, P.; Karamanidis, K. Head-Mounted and Hand-Held Displays Diminish the Effectiveness of Fall-Resisting Skills. Sensors 2022, 22, 344. https://doi.org/10.3390/s22010344

AMA Style

Weber A, Werth J, Epro G, Friemert D, Hartmann U, Lambrianides Y, Seeley J, Nickel P, Karamanidis K. Head-Mounted and Hand-Held Displays Diminish the Effectiveness of Fall-Resisting Skills. Sensors. 2022; 22(1):344. https://doi.org/10.3390/s22010344

Chicago/Turabian Style

Weber, Anika, Julian Werth, Gaspar Epro, Daniel Friemert, Ulrich Hartmann, Yiannis Lambrianides, John Seeley, Peter Nickel, and Kiros Karamanidis. 2022. "Head-Mounted and Hand-Held Displays Diminish the Effectiveness of Fall-Resisting Skills" Sensors 22, no. 1: 344. https://doi.org/10.3390/s22010344

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop