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Open AccessArticle

Estimation of the Knee Adduction Moment and Joint Contact Force during Daily Living Activities Using Inertial Motion Capture

1
Department of Technology, Xsens Technologies B.V., Enschede 7521 PR, The Netherlands
2
Department of Biomedical Signals and Systems, Technical Medical Centre, University of Twente, Enschede 7500 AE, The Netherlands
3
Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg 9220, Denmark
4
Department of Materials and Production, Aalborg University, Aalborg 9220, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2019, 19(7), 1681; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19071681
Received: 7 March 2019 / Revised: 30 March 2019 / Accepted: 5 April 2019 / Published: 9 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Sensors in Healthcare: Methods, Algorithms, Applications)
Knee osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and disability in the elderly population with many daily living activities being difficult to perform as a result of this disease. The present study aimed to estimate the knee adduction moment and tibiofemoral joint contact force during daily living activities using a musculoskeletal model with inertial motion capture derived kinematics in an elderly population. Eight elderly participants were instrumented with 17 inertial measurement units, as well as 53 opto-reflective markers affixed to anatomical landmarks. Participants performed stair ascent, stair descent, and sit-to-stand movements while both motion capture methods were synchronously recorded. A musculoskeletal model containing 39 degrees-of-freedom was used to estimate the knee adduction moment and tibiofemoral joint contact force. Strong to excellent Pearson correlation coefficients were found for the IMC-derived kinematics across the daily living tasks with root mean square errors (RMSE) between 3° and 7°. Furthermore, moderate to strong Pearson correlation coefficients were found in the knee adduction moment and tibiofemoral joint contact forces with RMSE between 0.006–0.014 body weight × body height and 0.4 to 1 body weights, respectively. These findings demonstrate that inertial motion capture may be used to estimate knee adduction moments and tibiofemoral contact forces with comparable accuracy to optical motion capture. View Full-Text
Keywords: IMU; knee osteoarthritis; wearable technology; motion capture; musculoskeletal model IMU; knee osteoarthritis; wearable technology; motion capture; musculoskeletal model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Konrath, J.M.; Karatsidis, A.; Schepers, H.M.; Bellusci, G.; de Zee, M.; Andersen, M.S. Estimation of the Knee Adduction Moment and Joint Contact Force during Daily Living Activities Using Inertial Motion Capture. Sensors 2019, 19, 1681. https://doi.org/10.3390/s19071681

AMA Style

Konrath JM, Karatsidis A, Schepers HM, Bellusci G, de Zee M, Andersen MS. Estimation of the Knee Adduction Moment and Joint Contact Force during Daily Living Activities Using Inertial Motion Capture. Sensors. 2019; 19(7):1681. https://doi.org/10.3390/s19071681

Chicago/Turabian Style

Konrath, Jason M.; Karatsidis, Angelos; Schepers, H. M.; Bellusci, Giovanni; de Zee, Mark; Andersen, Michael S. 2019. "Estimation of the Knee Adduction Moment and Joint Contact Force during Daily Living Activities Using Inertial Motion Capture" Sensors 19, no. 7: 1681. https://doi.org/10.3390/s19071681

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