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Review

Next Generation Cereal Crop Yield Enhancement: From Knowledge of Inflorescence Development to Practical Engineering by Genome Editing

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ki-Hong Jung and Jae-Yean Kim
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(10), 5167; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22105167
Received: 1 April 2021 / Revised: 6 May 2021 / Accepted: 10 May 2021 / Published: 13 May 2021
Artificial domestication and improvement of the majority of crops began approximately 10,000 years ago, in different parts of the world, to achieve high productivity, good quality, and widespread adaptability. It was initiated from a phenotype-based selection by local farmers and developed to current biotechnology-based breeding to feed over 7 billion people. For most cereal crops, yield relates to grain production, which could be enhanced by increasing grain number and weight. Grain number is typically determined during inflorescence development. Many mutants and genes for inflorescence development have already been characterized in cereal crops. Therefore, optimization of such genes could fine-tune yield-related traits, such as grain number. With the rapidly advancing genome-editing technologies and understanding of yield-related traits, knowledge-driven breeding by design is becoming a reality. This review introduces knowledge about inflorescence yield-related traits in cereal crops, focusing on rice, maize, and wheat. Next, emerging genome-editing technologies and recent studies that apply this technology to engineer crop yield improvement by targeting inflorescence development are reviewed. These approaches promise to usher in a new era of breeding practice. View Full-Text
Keywords: crop-yield improvement; breeding; inflorescence development; genome editing crop-yield improvement; breeding; inflorescence development; genome editing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, L.; Lindsay, P.L.; Jackson, D. Next Generation Cereal Crop Yield Enhancement: From Knowledge of Inflorescence Development to Practical Engineering by Genome Editing. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 5167. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22105167

AMA Style

Liu L, Lindsay PL, Jackson D. Next Generation Cereal Crop Yield Enhancement: From Knowledge of Inflorescence Development to Practical Engineering by Genome Editing. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(10):5167. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22105167

Chicago/Turabian Style

Liu, Lei, Penelope L. Lindsay, and David Jackson. 2021. "Next Generation Cereal Crop Yield Enhancement: From Knowledge of Inflorescence Development to Practical Engineering by Genome Editing" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 10: 5167. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22105167

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