Topic Editors

Prof. Dr. Alexander Brill
1. Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
2. Department of Pathophysiology, Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia
Dr. Isabelle I. Salles-Crawley
Vascular Biology Research Centre, Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute, St. George's University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, UK

Thrombosis: From Basic Mechanisms to Saving Lives

Abstract submission deadline
31 July 2023
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (30 November 2022)
Viewed by
4898

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Thrombosis underlies multiple diseases which are among the main causes of death worldwide. For example, thrombosis is a central mechanism for pathologies such as myocardial infarction/heart attack, ischemic stroke, deep vein thrombosis, as well as many others. Pathways leading to thrombus development in both arteries and veins present their own characteristics but are incompletely understood. On the other hand, modern methods of antithrombotic therapy have certain disadvantages, including insufficient efficacy or bleeding complications. In the present Special Issue, we intend to discuss both fundamental and clinical aspects of various types of thrombosis, novel methods and perspectives of thrombosis prevention, as well as new approaches to diagnosis of thrombosis-based diseases. We cordially invite all basic researchers and physicians to submit their original studies or reviews to this Special Issue and hope that this will give a great opportunity to share knowledge and discuss different facets of this life-threatening process.

Prof. Dr. Alexander Brill
Dr. Isabelle Salles-Crawley
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • thrombosis
  • deep vein thrombosis
  • pulmonary embolism
  • arterial thrombosis
  • platelets
  • neutrophils, NETs and thrombosis
  • blood coagulation
  • myocardial infarction
  • ischemic stroke
  • mechanisms
  • diagnostics
  • treatment
  • tissue factor
  • cancer and thrombosis

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Biomedicines
biomedicines
4.757 3.0 2013 17.4 Days 2200 CHF
Diagnostics
diagnostics
3.992 2.4 2011 17.7 Days 2000 CHF
International Journal of Molecular Sciences
ijms
6.208 6.9 2000 15.9 Days 2500 CHF
International Journal of Translational Medicine
ijtm
- - 2021 18.8 Days 1000 CHF
Reports
reports
- - 2018 19.5 Days 1400 CHF

Preprints is a platform dedicated to making early versions of research outputs permanently available and citable. MDPI journals allow posting on preprint servers such as Preprints.org prior to publication. For more details about reprints, please visit https://www.preprints.org.

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Journals
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Review
Platelet–Neutrophil Crosstalk in Thrombosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(2), 1266; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24021266 - 09 Jan 2023
Viewed by 894
Abstract
Platelets are essential for the formation of a haemostatic plug to prevent bleeding, while neutrophils are the guardians of our immune defences against invading pathogens. The interplay between platelets and innate immunity, and subsequent triggering of the activation of coagulation is part of [...] Read more.
Platelets are essential for the formation of a haemostatic plug to prevent bleeding, while neutrophils are the guardians of our immune defences against invading pathogens. The interplay between platelets and innate immunity, and subsequent triggering of the activation of coagulation is part of the host system to prevent systemic spread of pathogen in the blood stream. Aberrant immunothrombosis and excessive inflammation can however, contribute to the thrombotic burden observed in many cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we highlight how platelets and neutrophils interact with each other and how their crosstalk is central to both arterial and venous thrombosis and in COVID-19. While targeting platelets and coagulation enables efficient antithrombotic treatments, they are often accompanied with a bleeding risk. We also discuss how novel approaches to reduce platelet-mediated recruitment of neutrophils could represent promising therapies to treat thrombosis without affecting haemostasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Thrombosis: From Basic Mechanisms to Saving Lives)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Venous Thromboembolism in Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Diagnostics 2022, 12(12), 2954; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12122954 - 25 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 533
Abstract
Objective: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a life-threatening complication that may exacerbate cancer prognosis. Whilst some studies indicate an increased risk of VTE in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, the prevalence estimates on the pooled prevalence of VTE in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy are [...] Read more.
Objective: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a life-threatening complication that may exacerbate cancer prognosis. Whilst some studies indicate an increased risk of VTE in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, the prevalence estimates on the pooled prevalence of VTE in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy are not known. This study aims to calculate the pooled prevalence of VTE in chemotherapy-treated cancer patients. Methods: Studies on VTE occurrence in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy were retrieved after database search. The terms used included “cancer”, “chemotherapy”, and “venous thromboembolism”. A random-effects meta-analysis was conducted to obtain a pooled estimate of VTE prevalence in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Results: A total of 102 eligible studies involving 30,671 patients (1773 with VTE, 28,898 without) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled estimate of VTE prevalence was found to be 6%, ranging from 6% to 7% (ES 6%; 95% CI 6–7%; z = 18.53; p < 0.001). Conclusions: The estimated pooled prevalence rate of VTEs was 6% in cancer patients undergoing CRT, which was higher than the overall crude prevalence rate (5.78%). Comprehensive cancer care should consider stratified VTE risk assessment based on cancer phenotype, given that certain phenotypes of cancer such as bladder, gastric and ovarian posing particularly high risks of VTE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Thrombosis: From Basic Mechanisms to Saving Lives)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Case Report
Arterial Thrombotic Complications in COVID-19: A Case of Renal Infarction
Biomedicines 2022, 10(10), 2354; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10102354 - 21 Sep 2022
Viewed by 700
Abstract
COVID-19 infection has been associated with thrombotic complications, especially venous thromboembolism. Although arterial thrombotic complications are rarely seen in these patients, we report the case of a 43-year-old patient who developed thrombosis of the main branch of the left renal artery, causing partial [...] Read more.
COVID-19 infection has been associated with thrombotic complications, especially venous thromboembolism. Although arterial thrombotic complications are rarely seen in these patients, we report the case of a 43-year-old patient who developed thrombosis of the main branch of the left renal artery, causing partial infarction of the left kidney associated with severe pain. He had no risk factors for thrombosis except for COVID-19 infection. We excluded any possible condition usually associated with renal artery thrombosis/embolism (i.e., cardiovascular, oncological, hematological, or rheumatic). The thrombosis resolved after a combination of anticoagulant and anti-platelet therapy. This case highlights the importance of the risk of recurrence of thrombosis in patients with a recent history of COVID-19, even after hospital discharge, improvement of the initial thrombotic event, and clearance of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Thrombosis: From Basic Mechanisms to Saving Lives)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Neutrophils Mediate Pulmonary Artery Thrombosis In Situ
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(10), 5829; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23105829 - 23 May 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1596
Abstract
Pulmonary embolism is a life-threatening condition, which can result in respiratory insufficiency and death. Blood clots occluding branches of the pulmonary artery (PA) are traditionally considered to originate from thrombi in deep veins (usually in legs). However, growing evidence suggests that occlusion of [...] Read more.
Pulmonary embolism is a life-threatening condition, which can result in respiratory insufficiency and death. Blood clots occluding branches of the pulmonary artery (PA) are traditionally considered to originate from thrombi in deep veins (usually in legs). However, growing evidence suggests that occlusion of the vessels in the lungs can develop without preceding deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In this work, we used an inferior vena cava (IVC) complete ligation model of DVT in Wistar rats to explore the possibility and mechanisms of PA thrombosis under the conditions where all routes of thrombotic mass migration from peripheral veins are blocked. We demonstrate that rats both with normal and reduced neutrophil counts developed thrombi in the IVC, although, neutropenia caused a substantial decrease in thrombus size and a shift from fresh fibrin toward mature fibrin and connective tissue inside the thrombus. Massive fibrin deposition was found in the PA branches in the majority of DVT rats with normal neutrophil counts, but in none of the neutropenic animals. Neutrophil ablation also abolished macroscopic signs of lung damage. Altogether, the results demonstrate that thrombi in the lung vasculature can form in situ by mechanisms that require local neutrophil recruitment taking place in the DVT setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Thrombosis: From Basic Mechanisms to Saving Lives)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop