Topic Editors

Centre for Crop and Disease Management, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845, Australia
School of Land Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing, China
Department of Geomatics Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110167, China
Department of Land Use and Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China
Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Sciences and Technology Houari Boumediene (USTHB), Bab Ezzouar P.O. Box 32, Algeria

What Climate Adaptation Looks Like: Improving Healthy Landscape

Abstract submission deadline
closed (31 January 2024)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (31 March 2024)
Viewed by
6635

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate mitigation is one of the most discussed action goals, with over 200 countries pledging their support.

During and after the pandemic, climate adaptation has become more important. World leaders, civil society organizations, scholars, and citizens have been examining aspects of climate change adaptation, resilience, and impacts for many years.

Climate adaption is embedded in a number of different plans and programs that we are following locally, such as our flood hazard and fire emergency management plans. Six of the main ways related to landscapes we are adapting are summarized above.

Therefore, this Topic will seek submissions related to the following themes: achieving sustainability in the farming system; climate-ready buildings and infrastructures; land and water conservation; resilience in species, flood, and wildfire and the role of industry, agriculture, ecosystem, and health sectors.

This call for papers will provide readers from all backgrounds with new policy and strategy ideas on climate change issues.

Furthermore, this work will pave the way for advanced approaches (geo big data, artificial intelligence, open science) to guide future research in the field of climate change.

The topic is planned to bring together academia with the most up-to-date techniques and theoretical expertise to further our understanding of the importance of healthy landscapes to climate adaptation as well as inform policymakers about the stringent action insights required to reach climate adaptation in time.

Dr. Qianqian Zhang
Prof. Dr. Jinman Wang
Prof. Dr. Nisha Bao
Dr. Yang Wang
Dr. Salim Lamine
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • human–environment interaction
  • landscapes
  • resilience
  • climate adaption
  • land use

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Climate
climate
3.7 5.2 2013 19.7 Days CHF 1800
Ecologies
ecologies
- - 2020 19.8 Days CHF 1000
Land
land
3.9 3.7 2012 14.8 Days CHF 2600
Remote Sensing
remotesensing
5.0 7.9 2009 23 Days CHF 2700
Agronomy
agronomy
3.7 5.2 2011 15.8 Days CHF 2600

Preprints.org is a multidiscipline platform providing preprint service that is dedicated to sharing your research from the start and empowering your research journey.

MDPI Topics is cooperating with Preprints.org and has built a direct connection between MDPI journals and Preprints.org. Authors are encouraged to enjoy the benefits by posting a preprint at Preprints.org prior to publication:

  1. Immediately share your ideas ahead of publication and establish your research priority;
  2. Protect your idea from being stolen with this time-stamped preprint article;
  3. Enhance the exposure and impact of your research;
  4. Receive feedback from your peers in advance;
  5. Have it indexed in Web of Science (Preprint Citation Index), Google Scholar, Crossref, SHARE, PrePubMed, Scilit and Europe PMC.

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Journals
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
19 pages, 3538 KiB  
Article
Impact of Duckweed (Lemna minor L.) Growing in Paddy Fields on Rice Yield and Its Underlying Causes
by Liquan Jing, Xunkang Wang, Yihan Zhao, Fan Li, Yu Su, Yang Cai, Fucheng Zhao, Guichun Dong, Lianxin Yang and Yunxia Wang
Agronomy 2024, 14(4), 726; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14040726 - 1 Apr 2024
Viewed by 698
Abstract
Duckweed growing in paddy fields (DGP) has substantially increased because of the effects of climate warming and/or eutrophication in irrigated water. Previous studies have primarily focused on investigating the effects of DGP as a nonchemical agent for enhancing rice productivity on nitrogen utilization [...] Read more.
Duckweed growing in paddy fields (DGP) has substantially increased because of the effects of climate warming and/or eutrophication in irrigated water. Previous studies have primarily focused on investigating the effects of DGP as a nonchemical agent for enhancing rice productivity on nitrogen utilization in rice paddy fields. However, how DGP impacts rice yield remains poorly understood. Therefore, a field experiment with three representative rice cultivars was conducted to determine the effects of DGP on rice yield, considering ecological factors, photosynthetic capacity, spectral changes, and plant growth. The results showed that DGP significantly reduced the pH value by 0.6 and the daily water temperature by 0.6 °C, accelerated rice heading by 1.6 days and increased the soil and plant analyzer development (SPAD) and photosynthetic rate of leaves by 10.8% and 14.4% on average, respectively. DGP also markedly enhanced the values of various vegetation indices such as RARSc, MTCI, GCI, NDVI705, CI, CIrededge, mND705, SR705, and GM, and the first derivative curve of the rice canopy reflectance spectrum exhibited a ‘red shift’ phenomenon upon DGP treatment. Changes in the aforementioned factors may lead to average increases of 4.7% in plant height, 15.0% in dry matter weight, 10.6% in panicles m−2, 2.3% in 1000-grain weight, and ultimately a 10.2% increase in grain yield. The correlation observed suggested that the DGP-induced enhancement in grain yield can be achieved by reducing the pH and temperature of the paddy water, thus enhancing the SPAD value and photosynthesis of leaves and stimulating rice plant growth. These results could offer valuable theoretical support for the future sustainable development of agriculture and the environment through the biological synergy between rice and duckweed. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

17 pages, 2403 KiB  
Article
Ecosystem-Based Adaptation Practices of Smallholder Farmers in the Oti Basin, Togo: Probing Their Effectiveness and Co-Benefits
by Abravi Essenam Kissi, Grace B. Villamor and Georges Abbevi Abbey
Ecologies 2023, 4(3), 535-551; https://doi.org/10.3390/ecologies4030035 - 8 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1764
Abstract
The ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) strategy is considered an effective approach to address the impact of climate change while ensuring the continued provision of ecosystem services on which farming depends. However, understanding the EbA’s effectiveness for smallholder farmers in the Savannah region remains limited. [...] Read more.
The ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) strategy is considered an effective approach to address the impact of climate change while ensuring the continued provision of ecosystem services on which farming depends. However, understanding the EbA’s effectiveness for smallholder farmers in the Savannah region remains limited. The focus of this study is to explore the EbA practices that have been implemented by farming communities in the Savannah region of Togo. The study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of these practices and the perceived co-benefits reported by 425 smallholder farmers who participated in the survey. Our findings show that five practices, namely agroforestry, crop rotation, grass hedge/stone bunds, in-field water drainage channel, and intercropping, were practiced mainly by smallholder farmers and perceived as effective in reducing their vulnerability to climate risks. In addition, the benefits observed were linked to all five EbA practices. As a result, we can determine the suitable combination of EbA practices that fulfil the requirements of smallholder farmers, including co-benefits such as food security, adaptation advantages, and ecosystem service provisions. Such findings provide insights for developing integrated agriculture and climate change policies suitable for weather-induced disaster-prone areas such as the Savannah region. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 2401 KiB  
Article
Research on Rural Typology Based on the Symbiotic Model of Rural Revitalization and Basic Public Services
by Yujiao Li, Rong Ma and Bei Jin
Land 2023, 12(6), 1259; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12061259 - 20 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1450
Abstract
The basic unit of rural revitalization is the village. Rural revitalization can be comprehensively promoted by using rural typology as an instrument for rural zoning planning, which is a significant factor. This study clarified the relationship between rural revitalization and basic public services, [...] Read more.
The basic unit of rural revitalization is the village. Rural revitalization can be comprehensively promoted by using rural typology as an instrument for rural zoning planning, which is a significant factor. This study clarified the relationship between rural revitalization and basic public services, constructed evaluation index systems, and analyzed the symbiotic mode. The comprehensive development level and the symbiotic mode were incorporated to determine the type of village. The results showed the following: (1) The thriving industry and affluent life of Tangfang Town obviously contributed to its rural revitalization; the achievement of basic environmental improvement was eminent. (2) There are differences in the comprehensive development level of rural revitalization and basic public services among administrative villages, with an overall trend of “high in the north and low in the south”, corresponding to the industrial layout of “north industry and south agriculture” in Tangfang Town. (3) The symbiosis coefficients of all the administrative villages in Tangfang Town were between 0 and 0.5, and there was a positive symmetric mutualism relationship overall, indicating that basic public services have a significant impact and can effectively promote the process of rural revitalization. (4) Villages in Tangfang Town are divided into five functional areas—the comprehensive coordination area, potential improvement area, restricted development area, unbalanced allocation area, and backward guarantee area—and various types of optimization development strategies are proposed. As one of the top 100 demonstration towns for rural revitalization in Shaanxi Province, Tangfang Town plays a leading and exemplary role. Within the context of rural revitalization strategies, solving the problem of how to realize differentiated development in the next five years has become urgent. This study aimed to effectively promote the process of rural revitalization, provide theoretical guidance for scientific development in Tangfang Town, and promote research ideas for other towns in China. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1706 KiB  
Article
Stem Diameter Decrement in Holm Oak (Quercus rotundifolia Lam.): Insights into Tree Decline Pathways in Endangered Woodlands of Southern Portugal
by Augusta Costa and Ana Cristina Moreira
Ecologies 2023, 4(2), 229-241; https://doi.org/10.3390/ecologies4020016 - 2 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1326
Abstract
Stem diameter growth in living trees refers to the invariably increase in dimension over a given period. However, reversible stem diameter decrease could occur, related to water movement in the vessels within the wood (on a daily basis) and to tree water deficit [...] Read more.
Stem diameter growth in living trees refers to the invariably increase in dimension over a given period. However, reversible stem diameter decrease could occur, related to water movement in the vessels within the wood (on a daily basis) and to tree water deficit and depletion of stored water (on a seasonal basis). Recently, the perennial decrement in stem diameter size has been related to a tree decline pathway, and eventually resulting in tree death. In this study, we analysed stem diameter intra-annual growth dynamics of holm oak (Quercus rotundifolia Lam.) trees for two full growing seasons in distinct woodlands, Laborela and Aldeia dos Fernandes, in southern Portugal (Ourique district). Our focus was to assess stem diameter growth patterns and trends in holm oak trees in endangered woodlands with high tree mortality and to question if perennial decrement. Holm oaks in Laborela were much more sensitive in their stem diameter variations than in Aldeia dos Fernandes and, on average, their stem diameter decreased continuously by 1.0 mm along the 2-year study period, with a slightly higher annual decrease in the first study year (0.6 mm.yr−1). In addition, on average, trees had a higher decrease in stem sectional area of 5.8 cm2 in Laborela against a decrease of 3.7 cm2 in Aldeia dos Fernandes, where the stem diameter of holm oaks only decreased in the first study year (0.1 mm.yr−1). In each study area, the repeated- measures ANOVA showed that tree size effect influenced the stem diameter variations in contrast to tree crown defoliation. Trees were, on average, relatively smaller in Laborela, with DBH = 35.5 cm against DBH = 40.6 cm in Aldeia dos Fernandes, and were highly sensitive in their stem diameter decrement along two consecutives full growing seasons. This is the first exploratory study on assessing the stem diameter fluctuations on holm oaks to address a decline pathway. Our results revealed that holm oaks can survive during two consecutive growing seasons, with a continuous decrease in their stem diameters, which might indicate one tree’s decline pathway. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop