Special Issue "Wave-Driven Processes in the Coastal Zones"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Oceans and Coastal Zones".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 2932

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Carla Faraci
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Università degli Studi di Messina, Messina, Italy
Interests: wave–current interaction; wave structure interaction; sediment transport; coastal bedforms
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Claudio Iuppa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Università degli Studi di Messina, Messina, Italy
Interests: wave energy; wave overtopping; wave–structure interaction; CFD; prediction method; ANN

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The processes occurring during wave propagation in the nearshore assume massive importance, since shorelines are exposed to several hazards as well as being highly densely populated. Storms, erosion and flooding can be mentioned as examples. Moreover, due to climate change, a significant increase in the risk related to such hazards is expected.

In this context, this Special Issue aims to collect recent advances in the research on hydrodynamic and morphodynamic processes occurring in the coastal zones. In particular, the purpose of this Special Issue is to publish original research articles that are focused on the development of methods for short- and long-term prediction of the wave impacts on structures and beaches.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following aspects:

  • Wave–structure interactions, including wave reflection, transmission and overtopping;
  • Wave transformation;
  • Wave-driven sediment transport and coastal bedforms;
  • Effects of climate changes and mitigation measures on beaches;
  • Numerical and physical models as well as field measurement in the coastal zone.

Prof. Dr. Carla Faraci
Dr. Claudio Iuppa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • numerical model and physical model on hydrodynamic and morphodynamic processes
  • wave process analysis on the basis field measurement
  • effects of climate change on the coastal wave-driven processes
  • coastal flooding
  • prediction of wave loading, wave overtopping and wave run-up on coastal structures
  • modelling wave–structure interactions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Collinear Interaction of Waves and Current in the Presence of Ripple in the U-Tube
Water 2022, 14(3), 470; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14030470 - 04 Feb 2022
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Abstract
Ripple formation and evolution as well as vortex separation along the bedform profile strongly influence surface waves and sediment transport. These features were investigated in a U-Tube at the Hydraulics Laboratory of the University of Messina. During the experimental campaign, tests in the [...] Read more.
Ripple formation and evolution as well as vortex separation along the bedform profile strongly influence surface waves and sediment transport. These features were investigated in a U-Tube at the Hydraulics Laboratory of the University of Messina. During the experimental campaign, tests in the presence of wave only, current only, and collinear wave plus current in wave dominated regime were carried out. The experiments involved both live bed and fixed bed conditions. It was observed that, when the current superimposes to the wave, a longer time is required for the bedforms to stabilize; the vortex separating at the ripple crest reduces with respect to the wave only case. Accordingly, in the fixed rippled bed case, velocity measured in current only condition is larger than that in the wave plus current flow. As vortex shedding influences the way sediments are transported close to the bed, the obtained results may improve the present knowledge on wave current interaction in the presence of bedforms with repercussions in turn on sediment dynamics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave-Driven Processes in the Coastal Zones)
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Article
Calibration of CFD Numerical Model for the Analysis of a Combined Caisson
Water 2021, 13(20), 2862; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202862 - 13 Oct 2021
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Abstract
The purpose of this work is the calibration of a numerical model for simulating the interaction of waves with a composite caisson having an internal rubble mound to dissipate incident sea wave energy. In particular, the analysis focused on the reflection coefficient and [...] Read more.
The purpose of this work is the calibration of a numerical model for simulating the interaction of waves with a composite caisson having an internal rubble mound to dissipate incident sea wave energy. In particular, the analysis focused on the reflection coefficient and the pressure distribution at the caisson vertical walls. The numerical model is based on the Volume-Average Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes (VARANS) equations. Through three closure terms (linear, nonlinear, and transition), such equations take into account some phenomena that cannot be dealt when the volume-average method is used (i.e., frictional forces, pressure force, and added mass). To reproduce properly the real phenomena, a calibration process of such terms is necessary. The reference data used in the calibration process were obtained from an experimental campaign carried out at the Hydraulics Laboratory of the University of Messina. The calibration process allowed the proper prediction of certain phenomena to be expressed as a function of different closing terms. In particular, it was estimated that the reflection coefficient and the wave loading at the frontal wall are better reproduced when all three terms are considered, while the force at the rear wall is better simulated when the effects of such terms are neglected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave-Driven Processes in the Coastal Zones)
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Article
Investigating Controls on Barrier Island Overwash and Evolution during Extreme Storms
Water 2021, 13(20), 2829; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202829 - 12 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 959
Abstract
Over short periods of time, extreme storms can significantly alter barrier island morphology, increasing the vulnerability of coastal habitats and communities relative to future storms. These impacts are complex and the result of interactions between oceanographic conditions and the geomorphic, geological, and ecological [...] Read more.
Over short periods of time, extreme storms can significantly alter barrier island morphology, increasing the vulnerability of coastal habitats and communities relative to future storms. These impacts are complex and the result of interactions between oceanographic conditions and the geomorphic, geological, and ecological characteristics of the island. A 2D XBeach model was developed and compared to observations in order to study these interactions along an undeveloped barrier island near the landfall of Hurricane Florence in 2018. Beachface water levels during the storm were obtained from two cross-shore arrays of pressure sensors for comparison to model hydrodynamics. Aerial drone imagery was used to derive pre-storm and post-storm elevation data in order to quantify spatially varying erosion and overwash. Sediment grain size was measured in multiple locations, and we estimated spatially varying friction by using Sentinel-2 satellite imagery. The high spatial and temporal resolution of satellite imagery provided an efficient method for incorporating pre-storm spatially varying land cover. While previous studies have focused on the use of spatially varying friction, we found that the utilization of local median grain sizes and full directional wave spectra was critical to reproducing observed overwash extent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave-Driven Processes in the Coastal Zones)
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