Urban Water Policy and Flood Risk Communication

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (27 August 2019) | Viewed by 9504

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Urban Planning and Public Policy, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-7075, USA
Interests: water resource policy; urban water issues; environmental politics and policy; global climate change policy; ethics and environmental decisions; adaptive management and sustainable development

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Well over half of the world’s population now lives in cities, while many of the fastest growing urban areas lie within coastal areas and along rivers prone to periodic, sometimes severe, flooding. With climate variability likely to intensify, the ability of cities to forecast, prepare for, and manage flood risks—while simultaneously addressing other water challenges such as the management of runoff pollution, the possible harvesting of stormwater for local supply, and the need to prepare for periods of intense drought—make risk communication all the more difficult. We invite cutting-edge contributions that address these and related issues in the context of challenges to, and means of overcoming, the problems in flood risk communication. Authors are encouraged to address topics such as communication across disciplinary boundaries, the use of social media to disseminate information on both long- and short-term flood-related hazards, the importance of understanding the needs of various audiences to whom risks are being communicated—especially under-represented groups—and the relationship between flood risk communication and urban governance and multi-hazards management. Original case studies, experimental risk communication efforts, and broadly comparative contributions that chronicle these and other challenges in developing societies are especially welcome.

Prof. Dr. David L. Feldman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • urban flood risk
  • social media
  • social justice
  • governance
  • hazards communication

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 5524 KiB  
Article
Addressing Pluvial Flash Flooding through Community-Based Collaborative Research in Tijuana, Mexico
by Kristen A. Goodrich, Victoria Basolo, David L. Feldman, Richard A. Matthew, Jochen E. Schubert, Adam Luke, Ana Eguiarte, Dani Boudreau, Kimberly Serrano, Abigail S. Reyes, Santina Contreras, Douglas Houston, Wing Cheung, Amir AghaKouchak and Brett F. Sanders
Water 2020, 12(5), 1257; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051257 - 28 Apr 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 4850
Abstract
Pluvial flash flooding (PFF) is a growing hazard facing cities around the world as a result of rapid urbanization and more intense precipitation from global warming, particularly for low-resourced settings in developing countries. We present collaborative modeling (CM) as an iterative process to [...] Read more.
Pluvial flash flooding (PFF) is a growing hazard facing cities around the world as a result of rapid urbanization and more intense precipitation from global warming, particularly for low-resourced settings in developing countries. We present collaborative modeling (CM) as an iterative process to meet diverse decision-making needs related to PFF through the co-production of flood hazard models and maps. CM resulted in a set of flood hazard maps accessible through an online viewer that end-users found useful and useable for understanding PFF threats, including debris blockages and barriers to mobility and evacuation. End-users of information included individuals concerned with general flood awareness and preparedness, and involved in infrastructure and emergency management, planning, and policy. CM also showed that rain-on-grid hydrodynamic modeling is needed to depict PFF threats in ways that are intuitive to end-users. These outcomes evidence the importance and transferability of public health rationale for community-based research and principles used here including recognizing community as a unit of identity, building on strengths of the community, and integrating knowledge for the benefit of all partners. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Water Policy and Flood Risk Communication)
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9 pages, 599 KiB  
Article
Can Citizen Science Promote Flood Risk Communication?
by Wing Cheung and David Feldman
Water 2019, 11(10), 1961; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11101961 - 20 Sep 2019
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 4306
Abstract
This article explores the challenges facing citizen science as a means of joining the efforts of scientists and flood-risk affected stakeholders in motivating citizen involvement in identifying and mitigating flood risks. While citizen science harbors many advantages, including a penchant for collaborative research [...] Read more.
This article explores the challenges facing citizen science as a means of joining the efforts of scientists and flood-risk affected stakeholders in motivating citizen involvement in identifying and mitigating flood risks. While citizen science harbors many advantages, including a penchant for collaborative research and the ability to motivate those affected by floods to work with scientists in elucidating and averting risk, it is not without challenges in its implementation. These include ensuring that scientists are willing to share authority with amateur citizen scientists, providing forums that encourage debate, and encouraging equal voice in developing flood risk mitigation strategies. We assess these challenges by noting the limited application of citizen science to flood-relevant problems in existing research and recommend future research in this area to meaningfully incorporate a “re-imagined” citizen science process that is based on the participatory theoretical framework. We also discuss one case study where the principles of collaboration, debate, and equal voice were put into play in an effort to apply citizen science and—in the long term—mitigate flood hazards in one set of communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Water Policy and Flood Risk Communication)
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