Next Article in Journal
Application of Composite Pre-Polymerized Coagulants for the Treatment of High-Strength Industrial Wastewaters
Previous Article in Journal
Characteristics of a Debris Flow Disaster and Its Mitigation Countermeasures in Zechawa Gully, Jiuzhaigou Valley, China
Previous Article in Special Issue
Can Citizen Science Promote Flood Risk Communication?
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Addressing Pluvial Flash Flooding through Community-Based Collaborative Research in Tijuana, Mexico

1
Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve, Imperial Beach, CA 91932, USA
2
UCI Blum Center for Poverty Alleviation, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
3
School of Social Ecology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
4
Water UCI, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
5
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
6
Zeppelin Floods, Irvine, CA 92691, USA
7
GHD, San Diego, CA 92123, USA
8
California Immigrant Policy Center, Los Angeles, CA 90014, USA
9
Office of Sustainability, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
10
City and Regional Planning, Knowlton School of Architecture, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
11
Department of Earth, Space and Environmental Sciences, Palomar College, San Marcos, CA 92069, USA
12
Department of Earth System Science, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(5), 1257; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051257
Received: 11 March 2020 / Revised: 14 April 2020 / Accepted: 16 April 2020 / Published: 28 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Water Policy and Flood Risk Communication)
Pluvial flash flooding (PFF) is a growing hazard facing cities around the world as a result of rapid urbanization and more intense precipitation from global warming, particularly for low-resourced settings in developing countries. We present collaborative modeling (CM) as an iterative process to meet diverse decision-making needs related to PFF through the co-production of flood hazard models and maps. CM resulted in a set of flood hazard maps accessible through an online viewer that end-users found useful and useable for understanding PFF threats, including debris blockages and barriers to mobility and evacuation. End-users of information included individuals concerned with general flood awareness and preparedness, and involved in infrastructure and emergency management, planning, and policy. CM also showed that rain-on-grid hydrodynamic modeling is needed to depict PFF threats in ways that are intuitive to end-users. These outcomes evidence the importance and transferability of public health rationale for community-based research and principles used here including recognizing community as a unit of identity, building on strengths of the community, and integrating knowledge for the benefit of all partners. View Full-Text
Keywords: flooding; pluvial; collaborative modeling; co-production; community flooding; pluvial; collaborative modeling; co-production; community
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Goodrich, K.A.; Basolo, V.; Feldman, D.L.; Matthew, R.A.; Schubert, J.E.; Luke, A.; Eguiarte, A.; Boudreau, D.; Serrano, K.; Reyes, A.S.; Contreras, S.; Houston, D.; Cheung, W.; AghaKouchak, A.; Sanders, B.F. Addressing Pluvial Flash Flooding through Community-Based Collaborative Research in Tijuana, Mexico. Water 2020, 12, 1257.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop