Stability Evaluation of Underground Water Reservoir in Deep Coal Mine

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrogeology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2022) | Viewed by 7180

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Water Resource Protection and Utilization in Coal Mining, China Energy Investment Group Co., LTD, Beijing 102209, China
Interests: water resource protection; utilization in coal mining
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Guest Editor
School of Mechanics and Civil Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology-Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: stability and permeability evaluaition; coal Mining; critical mechanics; cluster mechanics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Energy and Mining Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing), Beijing 100083, China
Interests: rock permeability; slope stability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As China’s primary energy source, coal will not lose its lead position for a long time. However, large-scale underground coal mining causes the outward drainage of a large amount of mine water and the leakage of shallow water. The discharged mine water is not only a waste of resources, but also brings about ground pollution. To address this issue, the novel approach of underground water reservoirs was proposed for water storage. So far, water storage in underground reservoirs in coal mines has been extensively applied in China’s Shenhua Group. However, the high in situ stress and hydraulic coupling effect develop a complex stress state in underground reservoirs. The stability evaluation of underground water reservoirs in deep coal mines has recently been a research hotspot. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight advances and breakthroughs in the stability problems of underground water reservoirs in deep coal mines.

Original theoretical research articles, review articles, and case studies are welcomed.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Stability assessment of underground water reservoirs;
  • Stability of coal and dam;
  • Mechanical behavior of coal;
  • Fluid–solid coupling;
  • Failure characteristics of coal and dam;
  • Constitutive properties of coal and dam;
  • Prevention and control methods of instability problems;
  • Fluid flow in coal.

Dr. Zhiguo Cao
Dr. Dongjie Xue
Dr. Yulong Chen
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • underground water reservoir
  • coal mine
  • artificial dam
  • fluid-solid coupling
  • stability evaluation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 16560 KiB  
Article
Impacts of Underground Reservoir Site Selection and Water Storage on the Groundwater Flow System in a Mining Area—A Case Study of Daliuta Mine
by Yanmei Chen, Yu Zhang, Fang Xia, Zhao Xing and Licheng Wang
Water 2022, 14(20), 3282; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14203282 - 18 Oct 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2303
Abstract
The natural ecological conditions in the Shendong mining area in China are very fragile, and water resources are seriously lacking. As the production scale of the Shendong mine continues to expand, the demand for water for production and living is also increasing; however, [...] Read more.
The natural ecological conditions in the Shendong mining area in China are very fragile, and water resources are seriously lacking. As the production scale of the Shendong mine continues to expand, the demand for water for production and living is also increasing; however, the available surface and underground water is decreasing, and the water scarcity in the Shendong mine is becoming increasingly apparent. Obtaining water resources is a major technological challenge for green mining. The underground reservoir is a new type of underground water conservancy project, and the water shortage in China’s coal mine pits is resolved by underground reservoirs, which also makes a substantial contribution to the effective utilization of water resources. How the construction of underground reservoirs affects the groundwater system in a mining area has become one of the most important factors to consider when finding sites for underground reservoirs. In this study, we took the Daliuta Coal Mine as an example. A numerical model based on the hydrogeological conditions in the mining area was developed to determine the effects on groundwater using FEFLOW software via the finite element method. The model was used to analyze the impacts of coal seam mining thickness, overlying lithology, water-storage range and the water level of the underground reservoir on the groundwater flow system in the mining area. The results indicate that the thickness of the coal seam mining and the lithology of the overlying reservoir both had a significant effect on the upper aquifer system. The water-storage range and water level of the underground reservoirs were the main influences on the lower aquifer system. The results prove that underground reservoir storage had a good effect on water retention in the groundwater system in the mining area, and was able to achieve the desired result of storing groundwater and reducing water loss. It also had a positive feedback effect on the mining area’s environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stability Evaluation of Underground Water Reservoir in Deep Coal Mine)
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15 pages, 2809 KiB  
Article
Effects of Site Karst Water on Fresh Coal Gangue at Baizhuang Coalfield, China—Leaching Characteristic
by Bin-Bin Jiang, Yu-Kai Huang, Dong-Jing Xu, Zhi-Guo Cao and Min Wu
Water 2022, 14(20), 3267; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14203267 - 17 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1237
Abstract
In mining areas where gangue is used for infill mining, Ordovician limestone karst water is affected by discarded gangue, and the water quality changes significantly. In this study, the effects of gangue on water quality change under different immersion solution conditions were evaluated [...] Read more.
In mining areas where gangue is used for infill mining, Ordovician limestone karst water is affected by discarded gangue, and the water quality changes significantly. In this study, the effects of gangue on water quality change under different immersion solution conditions were evaluated by Zhai Zhen Coal Mine, Hongqi Coal Mine Ordovician Limestone Karst Water, and Baizhuang Coal Mine. The results showed that the cations in each group of immersion solutions had similar trends, and the Na+ concentration fluctuations were greater in karst water immersion solutions with higher initial sodium ion concentrations, while the fluctuations of calcium and magnesium ions were more obvious in the early stage of immersion, and the fluctuations were gradually slowed down in the later stage. The anions in the immersion solution also have a similar fluctuation trend, but only in the early stage of immersion. By comparing the changes of the three indexes (pH, TDS, and ORP) in the immersion solution, it was found that highly mineralized karst water had a good buffering effect on the changes in the basic water quality index, while the ultrapure water quality index with low salinity had the greatest change. The 100% stacked columnar plot between the main water chemical ion changes shows the relative scale relationship of the water chemical components in the immersion solution at each period, and the water chemical components change significantly in the early immersion period (0–7 d), and then enter the fluctuation changes period, and the ion changes in the fluctuation changes period are mainly Na+ and SO42− ions. This study provides a theoretical basis for exploring the changes of gangue to the quality of karst water in Ordovician limestone and also provides theoretical guidance for the study of groundwater pollution mechanisms in closed coal mines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stability Evaluation of Underground Water Reservoir in Deep Coal Mine)
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16 pages, 4593 KiB  
Article
Study on the Instability Activation Mechanism and Deformation Law of Surrounding Rock Affected by Water Immersion in Goafs
by Sihai Yi, Yu Zhang, Haiyang Yi, Xueliang Li, Xu Wang, Yun Wang and Tingxiang Chu
Water 2022, 14(20), 3250; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14203250 - 15 Oct 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1293
Abstract
Large-scale goafs are left after coal seam mining. Due to the low-lying terrain, the goaf will be filled and soaked by groundwater, which may lead to instability of the remaining coal pillars in the goaf and cause uneven settlement of the overlying rock. [...] Read more.
Large-scale goafs are left after coal seam mining. Due to the low-lying terrain, the goaf will be filled and soaked by groundwater, which may lead to instability of the remaining coal pillars in the goaf and cause uneven settlement of the overlying rock. Consequently, there may be overlying rock movement and surface subsidence, which endangers the safety of the building (structure) above the goaf. Considering the strip goaf of Dai Zhuang coal pillar as an example, this study investigated the evolution of instability and deformation of surrounding rocks affected by water immersion using the similar material simulation test method. The results of the study reveal that under the effect of prolonged water immersion in the goaf, the damage to the coal pillar in the strip underwent a stagewise evolution process of several instances of creep damage at the edge of coal pillar followed by overall destabilization damage, and the overburden movement revealed stage characteristics of small step subsidence several times followed by sudden large subsidence. Furthermore, based on Wilson’s coal pillar instability theory, the instability mechanism of the strip coal pillar under the action of water immersion was found to be triggered by the reduced strength of the coal pillar from the effect of water immersion, the continuous creep damage to the strip coal pillar from outside to inside, and the continuous shortening of the elastic zone of the coal pillar until its bearing capacity was lower than the load it was carrying. The research results are expected to serve as theoretical guidance for the study of coal pillar stability and the development and utilization of surface construction above goafs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stability Evaluation of Underground Water Reservoir in Deep Coal Mine)
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16 pages, 6036 KiB  
Article
Effects of Coal Gangue on the Hydrochemical Components under Different Types of Site Karst Water in Closed Mines
by Bin-bin Jiang, Kai-ming Ji, Dong-jing Xu, Zhi-guo Cao, Shao-kun Wen, Kun Song and Li Ma
Water 2022, 14(19), 3110; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14193110 - 2 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1688
Abstract
In order to explore the potential effects of abandoned coal mines on the water quality of Ordovician limestone aquifers, water-rock interaction simulations were conducted. After the closure of the coal mine, the karst water in the goaf area and the waste gangue had [...] Read more.
In order to explore the potential effects of abandoned coal mines on the water quality of Ordovician limestone aquifers, water-rock interaction simulations were conducted. After the closure of the coal mine, the karst water in the goaf area and the waste gangue had a geochemical reaction, and the above-mentioned water-rock process was simulated by an indoor static immersion experiment to explore the differences in the effect of different types of karst water on the dissolution of gangue. The basic water quality parameters pH, EC (electrical conductance), and ORP (oxidation-reduction potential) showed different trends in karst hydro-immersion solution and ultra-pure hydro-immersion solution; pH and EC had greater fluctuations in two sets of ultrapure hydro-immersion solutions, while ORP fluctuated more widely in three groups of karst hydro-immersion solutions. In addition, gangue minerals dissolved more significantly in bodies of water where limestone was added. The results of chemical component clustering showed that TDS (total dissolved solids) and EC were homopolymerized in each immersion solution, and subsequent correlation analysis showed that TDS and EC clusters were more significantly affected by mineral properties in ultrapure water-immersion solutions, and more affected by dominant ions in karst water-immersion solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stability Evaluation of Underground Water Reservoir in Deep Coal Mine)
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10 pages, 5767 KiB  
Article
Remote Real-Time Monitoring System for Mine Slope Based on Cloud Computing
by Yijun Zhou, Yanlin Li and Yulong Chen
Water 2022, 14(5), 714; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14050714 - 24 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3185
Abstract
A remote real-time monitoring system was developed for the remote real-time monitoring of mine slope deformation and internal forces. The system is based on cloud-computing technology and a 5S multimedia streaming monitoring data transmission system. It has now been applied to an open-pit [...] Read more.
A remote real-time monitoring system was developed for the remote real-time monitoring of mine slope deformation and internal forces. The system is based on cloud-computing technology and a 5S multimedia streaming monitoring data transmission system. It has now been applied to an open-pit iron mine in Nanfen to monitor the horizontal displacement of potential sliding surfaces. Compared with geometric monitoring methods in traditional geodetic surveying, the results show that this monitoring system has higher accuracy (0.01 mm) and the ability to monitor in real time for 24 h. These features can realize early warnings of mine slopes from multiple dimensions, and provide a guarantee for safe, continuous and the efficient production of mines. In addition, it can provide a certain reference for the prevention and control of mine slope disasters, and is beneficial to the application of information-based early warning technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stability Evaluation of Underground Water Reservoir in Deep Coal Mine)
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