Special Issue "Nano and Micro Plastic Detection and Identification in Water"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sarper Sarp
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Engineering, Swansea University, Bay Campus, Swansea SA1 8EN, UK
Interests: nano and micro plastic detection and identification; water treatment; water quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Micro and nano plastics (MPs; NPs) are mainly the result of the degradation of larger plastic precursors via natural and eternal stimuli, such as weather, UV radiation, oxidation, etc. MPs are identified as plastic particles with a particle diameter below 5 mm. MPs are considered one of the most important environmental concerns, because of their extremely long degredation times (via natural processes) and their inert nature. NPs are defined as plastic particles with a particle diameter below 0.001 mm, and there have been numerous recent studies focusing on the toxicity of NPs, including cytotoxicy and oxidative stress from NPs as they could cross the cell wall and can interact with the cell functions.

Therefore, it is extremely important to accurately identify and quantify MPs and NPs in water sources. This Special Issue will focus on bringing high quality research studies related to identifying MPs and NPs in water sources. We will be focusing on methods for the sampling, separation, purification, and identification of MPs and NPs in water. We are interested in receiving a wide range of research works, from more traditional approaches to novel methods.

Dr. Sarper Sarp
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microplastics
  • nanoplastics
  • separation
  • identification
  • sampling methods
  • sample preparation
  • spectroscopic methods
  • thermal methods

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Comparison of Different Procedures for Separating Microplastics from Sediments
Water 2021, 13(20), 2854; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202854 - 13 Oct 2021
Viewed by 531
Abstract
The separation of microplastics from environmental matrices is still challenging, especially for sediments where microplastics can accumulate affecting benthic organisms. Many authors have adopted different procedures, but their effectiveness has been rarely compared. The present study aims to compare the recovery rate of [...] Read more.
The separation of microplastics from environmental matrices is still challenging, especially for sediments where microplastics can accumulate affecting benthic organisms. Many authors have adopted different procedures, but their effectiveness has been rarely compared. The present study aims to compare the recovery rate of three different methodologies for the separation of dense microplastics from fine sediments and provide insights about contamination processes occurring in microplastic separation techniques. The protocols tested are a density separation method with NaCl and NaI, a density separation with NaI followed by a centrifugation step, and a digestion method with 10%KOH (m/v). The recovery yields of two high-density polymers of three different dimensional classes were tested. The highest recovery rate was reported for the first protocol. However, this method proved to be expensive, and unsatisfactory results were found when using merely NaCl. The digestion method was the one that was proven to be simple, reproducible, and affordable. The contamination tests highlighted as multiple filtration steps can increase the number of fibers deriving from airborne contamination. Since a unified approach for microplastic separation from sediments is still not selected, this study is of paramount importance as it provides data about the reliability of different methods widely adopted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano and Micro Plastic Detection and Identification in Water)
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Article
Microplastics Footprints in a High-Altitude Basin of the Tibetan Plateau, China
Water 2021, 13(20), 2805; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202805 - 09 Oct 2021
Viewed by 497
Abstract
Microplastics (MPs) are ubiquitous in the environment and have been drawing increasing attention; however, MPs’ occurrence and behavior in remote areas are not well understood. In this study, we quantified and characterized MPs from surface waters and sediments in a remote area, namely [...] Read more.
Microplastics (MPs) are ubiquitous in the environment and have been drawing increasing attention; however, MPs’ occurrence and behavior in remote areas are not well understood. In this study, we quantified and characterized MPs from surface waters and sediments in a remote area, namely the Tibetan Plateau, China. The samples were collected from the Lhasa River and the lower reaches of the Brahmaputra River to better understand MPs’ sources to rivers of the Tibetan Plateau. MPs’ concentrations in water and sediment were 735 items/m3 and 51 items/kg, respectively, and the dominating MPs observed were fibers with size ranging from 100 to 500 µm. MP abundance increased nearly two-fold from upstream to downstream in the Brahmaputra River, associated with the inputs from downstream human activities and the inflows of tributaries (especially the Lhasa River). This study provides important bases for analyzing MPs migration processes in the plateau region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano and Micro Plastic Detection and Identification in Water)
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