Low-Cost Water Management Solutions

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 9848

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
Interests: low cost wastewater treatments; waster regeneration; microalgae based systems; energy recovery from wastewater and solid wastes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last few years, the wide concerns about water scarcity, water pollution and circular economy have resulted in an emerging interest in the development of low-cost water treatment systems. The continuously increasing threat to global water supplies makes it imperative to create water security strategies to preserve sources by reconsidering impacts of technologies applied. Wastewater treatment and reutilization has been pointed out as a cornerstone of future sustainable towns, factories and other water demanding activities. Conventional technologies of water treatment and reutilization were developed during the past century inside a context of massive fossil fuel and resources utilization. Nowadays, this picture has changed and technologies of low carbon and reduced energy consumption must be adapted to every human activity. In this scenario, low-cost water management strategies must be adopted. This include the development of new processes and revisitation of green methods based on nature based technologies. Our goal in proposing this special issue entitled “Low-cost water management solutions” is to combine innovative and already stablished research activities on environmentally friendly technologies of water management. Therefore, the contributions to this special issue will encompass a broad spectrum of topics in low impact water technologies, including, but not limited to:

  • Green technologies for wastewater treatment
  • Wastewater reuse: new technologies with low energy impact
  • Nature based solutions for wastewater treatment and reuse
  • Resource recovery from wastewater
  • Emerging pollutants in water resources, occurrence and solutions
  • Renewable solutions for water scarcity
  • Sustainable agriculture in the water scarcity scenario
  • Smart solutions for water management
  • Wastewater as nutrient resource
  • Green filters for water treatment and resource recovery
  • Microalgae based solutions for organic effluent treatment
  • Smart water management in modern agriculture
  • Water reutilization in circular economy
  • Water regulation in the global warming scenario
  • Organic polluted effluents as energy and nutrient resource

Dr. Ignacio de Godos
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • low-cost water management
  • water treatment green technologies
  • water reuse
  • water disinfection
  • wastewater as resource
  • water scarcity challenge
  • emerging pollutants
  • zero-waste strategy in water management
  • water energy nexus

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 76591 KiB  
Article
Nutrients Removal from Aquaculture Wastewater by Biofilter/Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Systems
by Nicoleta-Oana Nicula, Eduard-Marius Lungulescu, Ioannis A. Ieropoulos, Gimi A. Rimbu and Ortansa Csutak
Water 2022, 14(4), 607; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14040607 - 16 Feb 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4119
Abstract
The presence of nutrients in aquaculture water bodies causes serious problems for aquatic ecosystems, requiring the development of technical solutions to reduce their amounts. This work identifies some bacterial strains that are able to reduce nutrient quantities and studies the effect of antibiotics [...] Read more.
The presence of nutrients in aquaculture water bodies causes serious problems for aquatic ecosystems, requiring the development of technical solutions to reduce their amounts. This work identifies some bacterial strains that are able to reduce nutrient quantities and studies the effect of antibiotics on bacterial growth, on the ability to form biofilms on different solid supports, and on the ability to reduce nutrients in aquaculture wastewater. Bacterial biofilm adhesion on different substrates depends on the surface properties of the substrate, on the bacterial types that form the biofilm, but also on biofilm–substrate interactions. The obtained results revealed the high capacity of biofilm-forming bacterial strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum to eliminate up to 87% of nitrate and nitrite ions and up to 62% of phosphate ions in the presence of concentrations of 0.1–0.4 µg/mL of oxytetracycline antibiotic from aquaculture wastewater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Cost Water Management Solutions)
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12 pages, 2923 KiB  
Article
Sheep Dung Ash as a Low-Cost Adsorbent for the Reduction of COD of Highly Polluted Oilfield-Produced Water
by Ahmed M. Abbas, Sayed M. Abboudy and Adel Abdelkader
Water 2022, 14(3), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14030434 (registering DOI) - 31 Jan 2022
Viewed by 2351
Abstract
Herein, we introduce a low-cost, available, renewable, and effective solid adsorbent used for oilfield-produced-water treatment using a straightforward treatment process. In the present study, sheep dung ash was prepared using the same way this waste is produced in rural areas when sheep dung [...] Read more.
Herein, we introduce a low-cost, available, renewable, and effective solid adsorbent used for oilfield-produced-water treatment using a straightforward treatment process. In the present study, sheep dung ash was prepared using the same way this waste is produced in rural areas when sheep dung is used as a source of energy for cooking and heating: by burning sheep dung with a direct flame. The prepared ash was characterized using FTIR, EDX, and SEM analysis techniques. The feasibility of the ash as a low-cost, available, renewable, and effective adsorbent for reducing the COD of oilfield-produced water with the initial COD of 21,600 mg/L was investigated. The effect of adsorbent dose, contact time (in hours and days), initial pH value, and initial COD value on the efficiency of sheep dung ash in COD adsorption was examined at room temperature. With shaking, the maximum capacity of sheep dung ash for COD reduction was found to be 71.8% at an adsorbent dosage of 30 g/L, an initial pH of 7, and a contact time of 1 h. Without shaking, a maximum capacity of 75% for COD reduction was obtained at an adsorbent dosage of 30 g/L, an initial pH of 7, and a contact time of 4 days. By applying the experimental results on Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption, it was found that the adsorption process of COD causing molecules follows both Langmuir and Freundlich models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Cost Water Management Solutions)
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14 pages, 2680 KiB  
Article
Structure-Based Long-Term Biodegradation of the Azo Dye: Insights from the Bacterial Community Succession and Efficiency Comparison
by Chao Zhu, Zarak Mahmood, Muhammad Saboor Siddique, Heyou Wang, He Anqi and Mika Sillanpää
Water 2021, 13(21), 3017; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213017 - 27 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2458
Abstract
In this study, microbial community dynamics were explored during biological degradation of azo dyes with different chemical structures. The effect of the different molecular structures of the azo dyes was also assessed against the simultaneous removal of color and the bacterial community. Winogradsky [...] Read more.
In this study, microbial community dynamics were explored during biological degradation of azo dyes with different chemical structures. The effect of the different molecular structures of the azo dyes was also assessed against the simultaneous removal of color and the bacterial community. Winogradsky columns were inoculated with dewatered sludge and separately fed with six different azo dyes to conduct the sludge acclimatization process, and nine bacterial decolorizing strains were isolated and identified. The decolorization and biodegradation performances of the acclimated system and isolated strains were also determined. Results showed that the bacterial isolates involved in decolorization and the degradation of the azo dyes were mainly associated with the azo dye structure. After 24 h acclimatization at room temperature without specific illumination, immediate decolorization of methyl red (89%) and methyl orange (78%) was observed, due to their simple structure compared to tartrazine (73%). However, after 8 days of acclimatization, methyl red was easily decolorized up to 99%, and about 87% decolorization was observed for orange G (87%), due to its complex chemical structure. Higher degrees of degradation and decolorization were achieved with Pseudomonas geniculate strain Ka38 (Proteobacteria), Bacillus cereus strain 1FFF (Firmicutes) and Klebsiella variicola strain RVEV3 (Proteobacteria) with continuous shaking at 30 °C. The azo dyes with benzene rings were found to be easier to decolorize and degrade with similar microbial communities. Moreover, it seems that the chemical structures of the azo dyes, in a sense, drove the divergent succession of the bacterial community while reducing the diversity. This study gives a deep insight into the feasible structure-based artificial manipulation of bacterial communities and offers theoretical guidance for decolorizing azo dyes with mixed bacteria cultures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Cost Water Management Solutions)
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