Hydrophysical Parameters and Gases in Ice-Covered Lakes

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 3191

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Hydrophysics, Northern Water Problems Institute Karelian Research Centre Russian Academy of Sciences, 185030 Petrozavodsk, Russia
Interests: lake hydrodynamics; dissolved oxygen; turbulence; lake ice; water temperature

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Guest Editor
Department of Geo-Ecology & Environmental Management, Institute of Earth Sciences, Saint-Petersburg State University, Saint-Petersburg, Russia
Interests: hydrology of polar regions; hydroecology and stability of aquatic ecosystems; geochemical features of lakes; river-bed processes

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Guest Editor
Department of Atmosphere Dynamics, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
Interests: air–sea–land interaction; remote sensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate warming is changing the physical regime of seasonally frozen lakes, especially the duration of freeze-up, water temperature, mixing regime and gas regime. These factors have a significant impact on the functioning of aquatic ecosystems in the annual cycle. Despite the increased interest in the winter period, we still know very little about how hydrophysical processes and ecological cycles in ice-covered lakes are changing as the climate warms. It is extremely important to fill this gap in order to understand the prospects for the development of aquatic ecosystems in the new conditions.

The main purpose of this Special Issue is to attract articles devoted to assessments of changes in the thermohydrodynamics and gas regimes of ice-covered lakes against the backdrop of climate warming.

The general topics of this Special Issue of Water are as follows:

1) Climatic factors that determine the evolution of the gas regime and thermohydrodynamic processes and phenomena in lakes covered with ice—reduction of the ice period, increased under-ice mixing, earlier onset of radiatively driven convection, under-ice oxygen production, etc.

2) Hydrophysical processes and phenomena that affect heat and gas fluxes at the water–ice and water–bottom boundaries, as well as inside the water column—internal waves, seiches, currents, eddies, heat and mass transfer with the bottom sediments, etc.

3) Formation and expansion of sub-lake taliks—influence on gas fluxes and thermal regime of ice-covered lakes.

4) Fluxes of gases in ice-covered lakes and the formation of seeps in ice.

5) Modeling of heat and mass transfer processes in ice-covered lakes.

6) Modern methods and approaches to the study of hydrophysical processes and gas regime in ice-covered lakes.

7) Ice and hydrochemical regime of meromictic and saline lakes.

8) Ice and hydrochemical regime of artificial water bodies (reservoirs).

9) Dynamics of aquatic ecosystems under the influence of the reduction of the freezing period; ecosystem modeling.

Therefore, this Special Issue aims to highlight the latest cutting-edge findings that may reveal trends in aquatic ecosystems under observed and expected climate and human impacts.

Dr. Galina Zdorovennova
Prof. Dr. Irina Fedorova
Prof. Dr. Irina A. Repina
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • ice-covered lakes
  • ice phenology
  • dissolved oxygen
  • greenhouse gases
  • climate change
  • water temperature
  • mixing
  • turbulence
  • modelling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1461 KiB  
Article
Ice Phenology and Thickness Modelling for Lake Ice Climatology
by Matti Leppäranta
Water 2023, 15(16), 2951; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15162951 - 16 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1235
Abstract
Analytic methods are useful for lake ice climatology investigations that account for ice phenology, thickness, and extent. Ice climatology depends on the local climate and lake characteristics, which can be compressed into a few forcing factors for analytic modelling. The internal factors are [...] Read more.
Analytic methods are useful for lake ice climatology investigations that account for ice phenology, thickness, and extent. Ice climatology depends on the local climate and lake characteristics, which can be compressed into a few forcing factors for analytic modelling. The internal factors are lake depth, size, and water quality, while the external factors are solar radiation, air–lake interaction, and heat flux from bottom sediment. A two-layer temperature structure with a sharp thermocline in-between is employed for the water body and a non-inert conduction law for the ice cover. A thermal equilibrium approach results in temperature and ice thickness solutions, and a time scale analysis provides the applicability of the equilibrium method for lake ice climatology. A non-steady solution is needed for ice melting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrophysical Parameters and Gases in Ice-Covered Lakes)
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14 pages, 4002 KiB  
Article
Water Temperature Evolution Driven by Solar Radiation in an Ice-Covered Lake: A Numerical Study and Observational Data
by Sergei Smirnov, Alexander Smirnovsky, Galina Zdorovennova, Roman Zdorovennov, Nikolay Palshin, Iuliia Novikova, Arkady Terzhevik and Sergey Bogdanov
Water 2022, 14(24), 4078; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14244078 - 14 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1821
Abstract
Until now, the phenomenon of radiatively driven convection (RDC) in ice-covered lakes has not been sufficiently studied, despite its important role in the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. There have been very few attempts to numerically simulate RDC due to the complexity of this [...] Read more.
Until now, the phenomenon of radiatively driven convection (RDC) in ice-covered lakes has not been sufficiently studied, despite its important role in the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. There have been very few attempts to numerically simulate RDC due to the complexity of this process and the need to use powerful computing resources. The article presents the results of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of RDC with periodic external energy pumping, which imitates the diurnal variations in solar radiation in the subglacial layer of lakes in spring. The research is aimed at numerically studying the initial stages in the formation and development of a convective mixed layer (CML). A numerical calculation was carried out for three variants of external energy pumping that differed in intensity. A diurnal acceleration and suppression of RDC due to a change in external pumping was revealed for all three variants. The results of numerical simulations provide estimates of such integral parameters of RDC development as the rate of deepening of the lower boundary of the CML, and the rate of water temperature rise within this layer. It was shown that as the cumulative heating of the CML increases over several days, daily increments in temperature and depth slowed down; that is, the dependence of the integral RDC parameters on external pumping was nonlinear. The LES results on RDC parameters were in good agreement with our observational data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrophysical Parameters and Gases in Ice-Covered Lakes)
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