Special Issue "Enhancing Resilience to Climate Change by Mitigating Extreme Wave-Induced Hazards on Sea Defences"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 1761

Special Issue Editors

Dr. John O'Sullivan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil Engineering, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
Interests: coastal engineering; water resource management; hydraulics and hydrodynamics; physical and numerical modelling; flood resilience; water quality
Dr. M. Salauddin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil Engineering, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
Interests: coastal engineering; climate resilience; nature-based sea defences; storm surge and wave impacts on coastal protections; physical and numerical modelling; extreme wave overtopping hazards; scouring; hydraulic stability of breakwaters; coastal retrofitting; coastal erosion; sediment transport; flood resilience

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the increasing threat of sea level rise and more frequent storm surges from global climate change, pressures from coastal flooding on critical coastal defences and the properties they protect are expected to become more acute. While hard engineered coastal protections such as seawalls provide essential protections, the longer-term sustainability of these defence lines is increasingly being questioned due to their environmental and ecological impacts in nearshore areas as well as their static nature in responding extreme meteorological events. The need for research that provides an evidence base to encourage the wider adoption of ecological interventions in existing and new coastal defences is increasingly being recognised.

This Special Issue will present state-of-the-art research that focusses on addressing wave hazards on sea defences (including but not limited to seawalls, dykes and breakwaters). Particular consideration will be given to studies that integrate ecological interventions with existing sea defences to provide coastal protection, but which also serve to enhance biodiversity in the nearshore areas. Original research articles that address the hydraulic performance of hard engineered sea defences, nature-based solutions and hybrid coastal protection approaches in mitigating extreme wave hazards in coastal areas are therefore encouraged. State-of-the-art review articles are also invited.

Dr. John O'Sullivan
Dr. M. Salauddin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wave overtopping
  • wave run-up
  • wave impact pressure
  • engineered sea defences
  • physical and numerical modelling
  • eco-retrofitting solutions
  • climate resilience
  • coastal flooding
  • nature-based solutions
  • flood resilience

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Wave Impact Loads on Vertical Seawalls: Effects of the Geometrical Properties of Recurve Retrofitting
Water 2021, 13(20), 2849; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202849 - 13 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 869
Abstract
This study investigates the variation of wave impact loads with the geometrical configurations of recurve retrofits mounted on the crest of a vertical seawall. Physical model tests were undertaken in a wave flume at the University of Warwick to investigate the effects of [...] Read more.
This study investigates the variation of wave impact loads with the geometrical configurations of recurve retrofits mounted on the crest of a vertical seawall. Physical model tests were undertaken in a wave flume at the University of Warwick to investigate the effects of the geometrical properties of recurve on the pressure distribution, overall force, and overturning moment at the seawall, subject to both impulsive and non-impulsive waves. Additionally, the wave impact and quasi-static loads on the recurve portion of the retrofitted seawalls are investigated to understand the role of retrofitting on the structural integrity of the vertical seawall. Detailed analysis of laboratory measurements is conducted to understand the effects of overhang length and height of the recurve wall on the wave loading. It is found that the increase in both recurve height and overhang length lead to the increase of horizontal impact force at an average ratio of 1.15 and 1.1 times larger the reference case of a plain vertical wall for the tested configurations. The results also show that the geometrical shape changes in recurve retrofits, increasing the overturning moment enacted by the wave impact force. A relatively significant increase in wave loading (both impact and quasi-static loads) are observed for the higher recurve retrofits, while changes in the overturning moment are limited for the retrofits with longer overhang length. The data generated from the physical modelling measurements presented in this study will be particularly helpful for a range of relevant stakeholders, including coastal engineers, infrastructure designers, and the local authorities in coastal regions. The results of this study can also enable scientists to design and develop robust decision support tools to evaluate the performance of vertical seawalls with recurve retrofitting. Full article
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