Coastal Planning and Sediment Management Perspectives

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Erosion and Sediment Transport".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 7709

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mathematics and Geosciences, University of Trieste, Trieste / CoNISMa, Italy
Interests: coastal morphodynamics; applied sedimentology; environmental impact and coastal vulnerability assessment; marine geology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
ENEA, Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development-Territorial and Production Systems Sustainability Department, 00123 Rome, Italy
Interests: environmental impact assessment; sustainable development and management of natural resources (sediment, water, and soil)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The planning and management of coastal zones is taking place, utilizing many adaptation and mitigation strategies. Governance of natural and anthropogenic impacts are rising, influencing the effort of scientists, stakeholders, and citizens toward sustainable development (Integrated Coastal Zone Management), management of natural resources (Marine Spatial Planning), monitoring (Marine Strategy) and improvement of quality standard (Marine litter).

Beach erosion is the result of a deficit in the coastal sediment budget, and, to manage this process, coastal sediment stock assessment is crucial. With it being hard to increase sediment input from the river system, which is actually reducing due to soil erosion control, flood reduction, and dam construction, a knowledge-based management of sediment moving along the coast is the only possible short- and medium-term strategy to address the problem, with or without hard shore protection structures. Urban planning is, of course, strongly influenced by our capability to mitigate vulnerability and risk along the coast.

Under a growing human coastal occupation, and within a sea level rise scenario, managing coastal evolution in relation to sea level rise scenarios and available natural capital and resources have scientific and technical issues, which deserve more consideration, also to reduce stakeholder conflicts. Papers comprising this Special Issue should be original contributions from the scientific community, as well from technicians or consultants of enterprises and public administrations, with the aim to collect and compare scientific, technical, and practical experiences supporting a wise management of the precious sedimentary resource.

Dr. Giorgio Fontolan
Dr. Sergio Cappucci
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coastal planning
  • sea level rise
  • sediment budget
  • beach erosion
  • beach nourishment
  • estuarine conservation
  • sediment storage
  • sediment dredging
  • coastal vulnerability and risk
  • marine environmental restoration
  • wetland reclamation

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 4062 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Coastal Morphology on the South-Eastern Baltic Sea Coast: The Case of Lithuania
by Ilona Šakurova, Vitalijus Kondrat, Eglė Baltranaitė, Erika Vasiliauskienė and Loreta Kelpšaitė-Rimkienė
Water 2023, 15(1), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15010079 - 26 Dec 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1828
Abstract
The Port of Klaipėda, located at the Klaipėda strait, divides the Lithuanian coast into two different geomorphological parts: southern—the coast of the Curonian Spit, and northern—the mainland coast. Port jetties interrupt the main sediment transport path along the South-Eastern Baltic Sea’s coast. Port [...] Read more.
The Port of Klaipėda, located at the Klaipėda strait, divides the Lithuanian coast into two different geomorphological parts: southern—the coast of the Curonian Spit, and northern—the mainland coast. Port jetties interrupt the main sediment transport path along the South-Eastern Baltic Sea’s coast. Port of Klaipėda reconstruction in 2002 and the beach nourishment project which started in 2014 significantly influenced the northern part of the coast, which led to changes in the coastal zone evolution. The measurements in various periods are essential for cross-shore profile elevation to analyze seabed morphology and sedimentation patterns. These data highlight our understanding of the scale and timing of seabed erosion or sedimentation processes scale and timing. This study evaluates the impact of anthropogenic pressure and natural factors on coastal geomorphology and dynamics. In order to assess the latter changes, the cross-shore profile evolution and sediment budget were analyzed as well as nearshore bathymetry changes. The data illustrated a changing picture of the entire shore profile—on land and underwater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Planning and Sediment Management Perspectives)
Show Figures

Figure 1

26 pages, 11563 KiB  
Article
Numerical Study on Measures for Protecting the Go-Cong Coastlines (Vietnam) from Erosion
by Dinh Cong San, Nguyen Binh Duong, Nguyen Cong Phong, Le Xuan Tu, Damien Pham-Van-Bang, Sylvain Guillou and Kim Dan Nguyen
Water 2022, 14(23), 3850; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14233850 - 26 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2155
Abstract
Every year, in the Vietnam Mekong Delta Coastal Zone (VMDCZ), erosions cause approximately 300 ha of agricultural land loss. Therefore, measures for shoreline protection are urgently needed. This paper discusses the impacts of protection measures in the Go-Cong Coastal Zone to prevent erosion/accretion [...] Read more.
Every year, in the Vietnam Mekong Delta Coastal Zone (VMDCZ), erosions cause approximately 300 ha of agricultural land loss. Therefore, measures for shoreline protection are urgently needed. This paper discusses the impacts of protection measures in the Go-Cong Coastal Zone to prevent erosion/accretion processes, predicted by two numerical models, MIKE21-FM and TELEMAC-2D. Hard and soft measures have been proposed using breakwaters and sandbars, respectively. The simulations show that the erosion/accretion trends provided by both models are similar. For breakwaters, MIKE21-FM provides less accretion than TELEMAC-2D in areas extending over 300 m and 500 m from shorelines. However, for sandbars, MIKE21-FM shows higher accretion within areas extending over 500 m but less than 300 m. Sandbars cause higher accretion in a larger area, extending over 1000 m offshore. The simulation results allow us to propose two alternative measures: (1) a row of several breakwater units will be implanted at 300 m offshore. The length of each unit is 600 m, with a gap between two neighbouring units of 70 m and a crest elevation of 2.2 m above mean sea level (MSL). (2) A row of sandbar units will be posed at 500 m offshore, with a unit length of 1000 m and a gap between the two neighbouring units of 200 m. The crest elevation is fixed at MSL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Planning and Sediment Management Perspectives)
Show Figures

Figure 1

22 pages, 6016 KiB  
Article
Sustainable Development Scenarios in the Danube Delta—A Pilot Methodology for Decision Makers
by Luminita Lazar, Steliana Rodino, Ruxandra Pop, Rachel Tiller, Nele D’Haese, Peter Viaene and Jean-Luc De Kok
Water 2022, 14(21), 3484; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14213484 - 31 Oct 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3059
Abstract
The Danube Delta, the second-largest wetland in Europe, provides people with multiple ecosystem services, consisting of drinking water, food, flood protection, nutrient recycling, and recreation, as it is a complex social–ecological system. Nowadays, the area faces heavy depopulation due to its failure in [...] Read more.
The Danube Delta, the second-largest wetland in Europe, provides people with multiple ecosystem services, consisting of drinking water, food, flood protection, nutrient recycling, and recreation, as it is a complex social–ecological system. Nowadays, the area faces heavy depopulation due to its failure in achieving an equilibrium between social, economic, and environmental issues. Therefore, its resurgence is the core element of its sustainable development strategy, and particular sectors such as fishing and aquaculture, agriculture, and tourism national strategies deal individually with essential issues without considering the potential conflicts that may arise from a particular sector’s development. This study develops a complex method for decision making concerning the sustainable development of the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve based on the consultation of both local and higher-level stakeholders in decision making, and the identification of social, economic, and environmental key problems. After their validation by experts, we developed a system dynamics model and ran the identified scenarios together with the stakeholders and recommended policies for the sustainable development of the area. The scenario that combines the transition towards the moderate Intensification of aquaculture with ecological agriculture and slow tourism brings a reduced impact on water quality, but measures to reduce nutrients are still recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Planning and Sediment Management Perspectives)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop