Transformation and Transport of Chemicals in Aquatic Systems

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 1778

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Department of Chemistry, Tennessee Tech University (TTU), Cookeville, TN 38505, USA
Interests: water chemistry; soil chemistry; environmental photochemistry; environmental chemistry of mercury and chromium; environmental chemodynamics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aquatic bodies play a vitally important role in our lives and society. Various natural chemicals and pollutants are constantly undergoing transformation and transport in aquatic systems. The transformation and the transport in aquatic systems exert an immense impact on the quality of bodies of water. Moreover, these two environmental processes are coupled, with complex interactions between them. For this Special Issue of Water, manuscripts (research articles, reviews, short communications) are welcomed that report original research or review the latest research progress and synthesis in: (1) aquatic transformation and/or the transport of various natural chemicals and/or pollutants and (2) the coupling/interaction of the transport and the transformation as a special interest. Field investigations, laboratory simulation studies, and modeling works are all invited to seek a comprehensive understanding of the transformation and the transport in aquatic systems, as well as their coupling through various environmental study approaches.

Prof. Dr. Hong Zhang
Guest Editor

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 1419 KiB  
Article
Chemodynamics of Mercury (Hg) in a Southern Reservoir Lake (Cane Creek Lake, Cookeville, TN, USA): I—Estimation of the Kinetics of Photochemical Reduction of Aquatic Hg(II) Using Field-Measured Data of Hg Water/Air Exchange and Dissolved Gaseous Hg
by Lesta S. Fletcher, William C. Crocker and Hong Zhang
Water 2023, 15(1), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15010199 - 03 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1428
Abstract
An alternative, independent estimation of the kinetics of aquatic Hg(II) photochemical reduction featuring dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) emission from water in consideration was obtained by using a mass balance box model. An interactive Excel spreadsheet was constructed to implement the model equations to [...] Read more.
An alternative, independent estimation of the kinetics of aquatic Hg(II) photochemical reduction featuring dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) emission from water in consideration was obtained by using a mass balance box model. An interactive Excel spreadsheet was constructed to implement the model equations to yield the rate constants and the rates of the Hg(II) photoreduction. The model calculations used field-measured data of DGM paired with its emission flux coupled with the corresponding field sampling times. This data set came from a previous, separate, year-long field study conducted at a southern reservoir lake (Cane Creek Lake, Cookeville, Putnam County, TN). The mean value of the model-calculated rate constants (kDGM) of the Hg(II) photoreduction for the warm season (June–August) (4.5 fM h−1/pg L−1) is higher than that for the cold season (October–January) (2.2 fM h−1/pg L−1). The rate constants were found to be the highest (22.5 fM h−1/pg L−1) in August whereas the lowest (0.03 fM h−1/pg L−1) in January. The model-calculated rate constants are clearly higher in value than but comparable in order of magnitude to the published kinetic data. The model-calculated rates (rDGM) of the Hg(II) photoreduction are significantly higher, by one order of magnitude (102 vs. 101) than the apparent rates calculated using the same field DGM data without consideration of the Hg emission from the water. A sensitivity analysis of the model parameters points to a high sensitivity of Hg emission flux to the rate constant under modeled realistic environmental conditions. The initial Hg(II) concentration is also a sensitive model parameter under certain conditions. The results of our model study support the conclusion that DGM emission from water has a strong impact on the kinetics of aquatic Hg(II) photoreduction and the model calculation can provide an independent, valuable approach for estimating the kinetics of aquatic Hg(II) photoreduction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transformation and Transport of Chemicals in Aquatic Systems)
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