Removal of Micropollutants in Water

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 March 2024) | Viewed by 3711

Special Issue Editors

1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Process and Environmental Technology Lab, KU Leuven, J. De Nayerlaan 5, 2860 Sint-Katelijne-Waver, Belgium
2. Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, Pharmaceutical Analysis, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
Interests: advanced oxidation processes (AOP); wastewater treatment; photocatalysis; catalysts; environmental catalysis
Center for Water and Ecology, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
Interests: catalytic ozonation; industry wastewater treatment; organic micro-pollutants (OMPs); advanced oxidation processes (AOP); microplastics (MPs); ozone

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the rapid development of industry on a global scale, organic pollutants are being increasingly released into the environment. The presence of recalcitrant and emerging micropollutants in the environment (such as pharmaceuticals, personal care products, etc.) has potential negative impacts on human health and ecosystems. Therefore, wastewater treatments are of the utmost importance. Among them, low-cost, high-efficiency, environmentally friendly, and sustainable water and wastewater treatment techniques have a high application potential.

This Special Issue welcomes original research papers and reviews on the removal of pollutants from (waste)water, involving novel methods and new materials in various aspects of wastewater treatment.

Subject areas may include but are not limited to:

  • Advanced oxidation process;
  • Photocatalysis;
  • Electrocatalysis;
  • Membrane process;
  • Application of metallic and non-metallic materials;
  • Production of by-products during wastewater treatment;
  • Removal of refractory organic pollutants in water;
  • New water treatment technology.

Dr. Xi Zhang
Dr. Ning Han
Dr. Siyu Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • (waste)water treatment
  • emerging contaminants
  • advanced wastewater treatment
  • catalyst
  • pollutants removal

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 5372 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Application of Chitosan-Based Sorbents for the Solid-Phase Adsorption Toxin Tracking of Microcystins in Irrigation Water
by Glynn K. Pindihama, Mugera W. Gitari, Rabelani Mudzielwana and Ntakadzeni E. Madala
Water 2024, 16(1), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16010041 - 21 Dec 2023
Viewed by 725
Abstract
In this study, a gluteraldehyde-crosslinked chitosan (ChGLA) hydrogel and a glutaraldehyde-crosslinked chitosan–multiwalled carbon nanotubes composite (ChMWCNT) were synthesized to be used as substrates in the solid-phase adsorption toxin tracking (SPATT) sampling of microcystins (MCs) in irrigation water. The synthesized samplers were tested for [...] Read more.
In this study, a gluteraldehyde-crosslinked chitosan (ChGLA) hydrogel and a glutaraldehyde-crosslinked chitosan–multiwalled carbon nanotubes composite (ChMWCNT) were synthesized to be used as substrates in the solid-phase adsorption toxin tracking (SPATT) sampling of microcystins (MCs) in irrigation water. The synthesized samplers were tested for their efficiency by deploying them in four farm dams and two canals for 48 h in January 2022 and in July 2022. Grab samples were collected during deployment and retrieval of the samplers for comparison. Sequential extraction using 100% methanol was used to extract MCs from the samplers, followed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis for total MCs and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for individual MC congeners (MC-LR, -RR, and -YR). The mean levels of dissolved total MCs detected by the samplers were as follows: ChMWCNT 0.754 (±1.085) µg g−1, ChGLA 0.420 (±0.546) µg g−1; and these were comparable to the Diaion® HP-20 resin: 0.602 (±0.627) µg g−1 of material. The mean level of MCs detected in the grab samples was 0.868 (±1.358) ug L−1. Significantly higher levels of MCs were detected in July compared to the January sampling by the two newly developed samplers. With regards to the detection of MC-LR, -RR, and -YR, no statistical differences were reported among the three samplers (ChGLA, ChMWCNT, and Diaion® HP-20) for five of the six sampling points (one-way ANOVA at a 0.05 level of significance). The levels of detection of MCs by the substrates were in the order MC-YR > -LR > -RR. Strong positive correlations between the grab samples and the ChGLA and ChMWCNT samplers suggested better suitability of the two chitosan-based sorbents for monitoring MCs in the study area compared to the Diaion® HP-20 resin. Overall, the two new sorbents showed potential for use in SPATT to monitor the presence of MCs in the agricultural waters tested, and they could represent economical and environmentally friendly options compared to the synthetic aromatic resins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Removal of Micropollutants in Water)
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19 pages, 4399 KiB  
Article
Effect of Hydrochar Modification on the Adsorption of Methylene Blue from Aqueous Solution: An Experimental Study Followed by Intelligent Modeling
by Shadi Kohzadi, Nader Marzban, Kazem Godini, Nader Amini and Afshin Maleki
Water 2023, 15(18), 3220; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15183220 - 10 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1075
Abstract
Wheat straw, which is a carbon-rich precursor and a common agriculture waste in Sanandaj, was modified to produce hydrochar with high adsorption capacity by the hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) method. The hydrochars were tested as adsorbents to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution, [...] Read more.
Wheat straw, which is a carbon-rich precursor and a common agriculture waste in Sanandaj, was modified to produce hydrochar with high adsorption capacity by the hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) method. The hydrochars were tested as adsorbents to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution, and the effects of various interfering parameters, including pH, MB concentration, and adsorbent dosage, were investigated using artificial neural networks (ANNs) on adsorption modeling. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics were studied to explain the MB adsorption process. The prepared hydrochars were characterized using Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDAX), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) instruments. The maximum MB removal efficiency achieved by hydrochar modified by KOH (0.1 M) and adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics. In terms of elemental composition, the hydrochar sample contained 52.19% carbon (C), 3.37% hydrogen (H), 0.1% nitrogen (N), 0.15% sulfur (S), and 35.66% oxygen (O). The ash content in the sample was 8.50%. The recorded hydrogen-to-carbon ratio (H/C) and oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O/C) indicated a shift towards humification, implying the influence of KOH addition during the hydrochar production process. Additionally, the specific surface area of the hydrochar, as measured by the BET method, was found to be 11.54 m²/g. Among the aromatics, a significant presence of hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was detected, with a concentration of 4.70 g/kg DM. The modeling results demonstrated that the concentration of MB had the most substantial impact on the predicted removal, followed by pH, adsorbent dosage, and contact time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Removal of Micropollutants in Water)
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14 pages, 8277 KiB  
Article
Study on Purification Efficiency of Novel Aquatic Plant Combinations and Characteristics of Microbial Community Disturbance in Eutrophic Water Bodies
by Jianna Jia, Huan Xiao, Shitao Peng and Kailei Zhang
Water 2023, 15(14), 2586; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15142586 - 15 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1342
Abstract
Aquatic plant restoration is an important technique for the treatment of eutrophic water bodies. There are significant differences in pollutant removal efficiency among different combinations of aquatic plant species in eutrophic water bodies. Therefore, further research on the selection of suitable combinations of [...] Read more.
Aquatic plant restoration is an important technique for the treatment of eutrophic water bodies. There are significant differences in pollutant removal efficiency among different combinations of aquatic plant species in eutrophic water bodies. Therefore, further research on the selection of suitable combinations of aquatic plant species is of great significance for the restoration of eutrophic water bodies. This study investigated the pollutant removal efficiency and bacterial community structure of three novel combinations of aquatic plants, including Lythraceae, Nymphaea, and Myriophyllum (LNM group), Lythraceae, Nymphaea, and Hydrilla verticillata (LNH group), and Lythraceae, Nymphaea, and Vallisneria (LNV group), as well as a control group (CK group). The components of the CK group were only sediment and culture water without any plants. The results show that on one hand, the LNH group had the highest removal rate of COD (90.29%); the LNV group exhibited the highest removal rates for NH4+-N and TN, with removal rates of 61.20% and 82.94%, respectively; and there was no significant difference in the removal rate of TP among the experimental groups, except for the LNH group, which showed higher initial removal efficiency for TP. On the other hand, plant combinations had different impacts on the top 13 dominant microflora at the phylum level. Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria showed the highest removal efficiency for COD in the LNH group, while Verrucomicrobi, Chloroflex, and Acidobacteria showed higher removal efficiency for NH4+-N and TN in the LNV and LNH groups. In summary, the three different combinations of aquatic plants exhibited distinct pollutant removal characteristics, significantly altered the structure of the microbial community, and provided a theoretical basis for their practical application in the restoration of eutrophic water bodies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Removal of Micropollutants in Water)
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