Internal Nutrient Cycling in Lakes and Reservoirs

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2024 | Viewed by 1604

Special Issue Editors

Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China
Interests: nutrients; nitrogen cycling; sediments; eutrophication; harmful algal blooms; water quality; lakes
Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China
Interests: lake; climate change; salinization; eutrophication; carbon and nitrogen cycling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrients (e.g., bioavailable inorganic and organic forms of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur) contribute to biological productivity. Excessive nutrient inputs have long been known to affect the eutrophication status of lakes and lead to frequent harmful algal blooms in lakes around the world. Moreover, the presence of internal nutrient cycling often causes a delay in lake recovery after external loading reductions. Internal nutrient cycling occurs at multiple places including water columns, sediment, suspended particles, and water–air and sediment–water interfaces. The cycling closely relates to biological (e.g., bacterial and algal communities) processes and/or physicochemical processes. Various drivers such as climate change, hydrological events, and human impacts can significantly influence nutrient cycling in lakes.

Due to the complexity of nutrient cycling in aquatic ecosystems, new insights are expected to be a broad scope of literature and help to target internal nutrient control. This Special Issue welcomes contributions on carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur dynamics as well as their couplings in lakes or reservoirs. Broad topics of interest include but are not limited to: nutrient regeneration and removal driven by biogeochemical or physicochemical processes; interactions between internal nutrient cycling and environmental changes (e.g., eutrophication, salinization, climate warming, and human impacts); estimation of nutrient fluxes/loadings/budgets across different phases/interfaces; eco-environmental effects of internal nutrient cycling, e.g., greenhouse gas releases; modelings or applications for assessment and control of internal nutrient loadings.

Dr. Xiaolong Yao
Dr. Xingyu Jiang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nutrients
  • internal cycling
  • carbon
  • nitrogen
  • phosphorus
  • sediments
  • transformations
  • transportations
  • assessments
  • lakes
  • reservoirs

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 3177 KiB  
Article
Photochemical Release of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen from Algal Detritus and Sediment Particles in Lake Taihu, China
Water 2023, 15(19), 3346; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15193346 - 24 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1092
Abstract
Solar irradiation in aquatic systems can induce the conversion of substances from the solid to the dissolved phase (photodissolution). Yet, the photochemical release of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) from internal particles in lakes remains largely unknown. In this study, suspensions of algal detritus [...] Read more.
Solar irradiation in aquatic systems can induce the conversion of substances from the solid to the dissolved phase (photodissolution). Yet, the photochemical release of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) from internal particles in lakes remains largely unknown. In this study, suspensions of algal detritus and sediment particles from a shallow eutrophic lake were exposed to simulated solar irradiation, and the release and compositional changes of dissolved organic matter were explored by measuring their UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy and ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). The photochemical release of inorganic nitrogen during the incubations was also investigated. Results showed that light irradiation induced stronger dissolved organic carbon and DON production in the algal detritus suspensions, with release rates of 1.17 mg C L−1 h−1 and 0.14 mg N L−1 h−1, respectively, at an algal detritus concentration of 0.1 dry g L−1. Light irradiation also induced compositional changes of DON in both algal and sediment suspensions. A larger number of DON molecules with lower molecular weight were continuously released in the algal suspensions, e.g., the total number of DON formulas increased from 1349 to 4135 during an 8 h irradiation. In contrast, upon irradiation of sediment suspensions, DON showed decreased molecular diversity and increased aromaticity. The photochemical release of ammonium (photoammonification) was also higher in the algal suspensions with a rate of 0.015 mg N L−1 h−1, which may contribute to the eutrophication of the lake. This study provides new molecular insights into the photochemical release of DON from typical internal particles in eutrophic lakes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internal Nutrient Cycling in Lakes and Reservoirs)
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