Recent Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 3204

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Higher Polytechnic School of Alcoy, Polytechnic University of Valencia, 03801 Alcoyi, Spain
Interests: wastewater treatment; advanced oxidation processes; photocatalysis; photo-fenton
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In 2015, all member states (193) of the United Nations approved the 2030 agenda on sustainable development, including 17 goals that constitute a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet, and improve the lives and prospects of people all over the world. Water and wastewater treatment plays a significant role since it directly or indirectly intervenes in many of these objectives, such as 2-zero hunger, 6- clean water and sanitation, 11- sustainable cities and communities, 12- responsible production and consumption, 14- life below water, and 15- life on land.

An important transversality can be observed water treatment since this affects many aspects of life. That is why different techniques and processes are needed to meet the sustainable development goals defined by the 2030 agenda. This Special Issue aims to capture a variety of processes instead of focusing only on a specific field of water treatment. Biological treatment (aerobic or anaerobic), membrane bioreactors, advanced oxidation processes, separation or filtration technologies, adsorption, electrochemical treatments, etc., are only some of the processes this Special Issue aims to address. Through this, a more global image of water treatment processes can be given that represents the current state of the art.

Prof. Dr. Lucas Santos-Juanes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advanced oxidation processes
  • biological technologies
  • membrane processes
  • electrochemical treatment
  • adsorption

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2674 KiB  
Article
Parabens and Methylisotiazolinone (MIT): Preservatives with Different Behaviors When Subjected to Ozone and Ultraviolet Light Treatments
by Rubén López-Timoner, Victoria Duarte-Alvarado, María Ángeles Castillo, Lucas Santos-Juanes, Antonio Arques and Ana María Amat
Water 2023, 15(21), 3837; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15213837 - 03 Nov 2023
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Abstract
The influence that contaminants exert on the degradation of other substances commonly found in the same water bodies drives this study, which aims to investigate the simultaneous degradation of preservatives such as parabens and methylisothiazolinone (MIT). Mixtures of five parabens, MIT solutions, and [...] Read more.
The influence that contaminants exert on the degradation of other substances commonly found in the same water bodies drives this study, which aims to investigate the simultaneous degradation of preservatives such as parabens and methylisothiazolinone (MIT). Mixtures of five parabens, MIT solutions, and mixtures of all five parabens plus MIT (each at 5 mg/L) were treated using 254 nm UV light, ozone treatments, and simultaneous ozone and UV light treatments at three different pH levels (3, 5, and 9). Regardless of pH, UV light is inefficient in degrading parabens, whereas MIT is efficiently degraded under this radiation. On the other hand, ozone treatments rapidly degrade the paraben mixture at any pH, with a basic pH resulting in faster degradation due to the predominance of the indirect mechanism. MIT, due to its structural characteristics, reacts minimally with ozone, and the process is enhanced at basic pH when hydroxyl radicals are involved. The simultaneous treatment with ozone and UV light proves to be the fastest method for eliminating both parabens and MIT at any pH. However, when treating joint mixtures of parabens and MIT, behaviors change notably, particularly for processes involving UV light due to the interfering effect of MIT. Both parabens and MIT require more time to degrade, except at an acidic pH. Only MIT reduces its ozone treatment time when treated alongside parabens due to the distinct degradation mechanisms that each type of contaminant has in the presence of ozone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment)
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20 pages, 3651 KiB  
Article
Improvement of the Carbocatalytic Degradation of Pharmaceuticals in Water by the Use of Ultrasound Waves
by Carolina Quimbaya-Ñañez, Efraím A. Serna-Galvis, Javier Silva-Agredo, Inés García-Rubio, Ricardo A. Torres-Palma and Yenny P. Ávila-Torres
Water 2023, 15(20), 3679; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15203679 - 20 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 934
Abstract
A carbonaceous material obtained from wood wastes (SW-Mn) was initially used for the removal of pharmaceuticals in water by a carbocatalytic system. The SW-Mn material adsorbed only 41% of the diclofenac (DCF) and 3% of the valsartan (VAL). Interestingly, SW-Mn activated peroxymonosulfate (PMS) [...] Read more.
A carbonaceous material obtained from wood wastes (SW-Mn) was initially used for the removal of pharmaceuticals in water by a carbocatalytic system. The SW-Mn material adsorbed only 41% of the diclofenac (DCF) and 3% of the valsartan (VAL). Interestingly, SW-Mn activated peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and presented a significant increase in the removal rate of DCF, surpassing 90%, while VAL achieved a 24% removal rate at 20 min of treatment. The carbonaceous material was not effective in activating peroxydisulfate or hydrogen peroxide. Nevertheless, the addition of ultrasound waves at 40 kHz to the carbocatalytic system (SW-Mn +PMS) significantly enhanced VAL degradation, exhibiting a high synergy index (4.98). The routes of the degradation were determined using scavengers, and XPS and EPR analyses, evidencing the main action of singlet oxygen in both carbocatalytic and sonocarbocatalytic systems. It is important to note that radicals also participated in the sonocarbocatalytic process, albeit with a minor contribution. The reuse of SW-Mn was tested during various cycles, showing up to a 39.2% VAL degradation rate after the third consecutive reuse. Moreover, the sonocarbocatalytic system was applied to a sample of irrigation crop water spiked with VAL. The treatment induced a partial elimination of the pollutant due to some interfering effects of the matrix components. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment)
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13 pages, 1903 KiB  
Article
Efficiency of Treated Domestic Wastewater to Irrigate Two Rice Cultivars, PK 386 and Basmati 515, under a Hydroponic Culture System
by Tahira Aslam, Safdar A. Mirza, Aneeba Rashid, Muhammad Arshad Javed and Luiza C. Campos
Water 2023, 15(17), 3149; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15173149 - 03 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1225
Abstract
The increasing human population continues to exert pressure on the freshwater scarcity. The availability of freshwater for crop irrigation has become challenging. The present study aimed to use domestic wastewater (DWW) for the irrigation of two rice cultivars (CVs) after treatment with the [...] Read more.
The increasing human population continues to exert pressure on the freshwater scarcity. The availability of freshwater for crop irrigation has become challenging. The present study aimed to use domestic wastewater (DWW) for the irrigation of two rice cultivars (CVs) after treatment with the bacterial strain Alcaligenes faecalis MT477813 under a hydroponic culture system. The first part of this study focused on the bioremediation and analysis of the physicochemical parameters of DWW to compare pollutants before and after treatment. The biotreatment of DWW with the bacterial isolate showed more than 90% decolourisation, along with a reduction in contaminants. The next part of the study evaluated the impacts of treated and untreated DWW on the growth of two rice cultivars, i.e., PK 386 and Basmati 515, under a hydroponic culture system which provided nutrients and water to plants with equal and higher yields compared to soil. Growth parameters such as the shoot and root length and the wet and dry weights of the rice plants grown in the treated DWW were considerably higher than those for the plants grown in untreated DWW. Therefore, enhanced growth of both rice cultivars grown in biotreated DWW was observed. These results demonstrate the bioremediation efficiency of the bacterial isolate and the utility of the DWW for rice crop irrigation subsequent to biotreatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment)
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