Rivers - Connecting Mountains and Coasts

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 2285

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and River Research, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, BOKU – University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria
Interests: sediment transport; river morphodynamics; ecohydraulics; river restoration; integrated flood risk management; sustainable hydropower
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E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and River Research, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, BOKU – University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna, Austria
Interests: numerical modelling; hydrodynamics; sediment transport; hydraulic engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Christian Doppler Laboratory vor Sediment Research and Management, BOKU—University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria
2. Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and River Research, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, BOKU – University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna, Austria
Interests: computer-aided simulation; geomorphology; hydraulics; hydrobiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rivers serve as crucial connections between mountains and coasts, and the challenges in managing them are complex and multifaceted. Climate change is one of the biggest of these challenges, leading to changes in water availability, increased frequency of floods and droughts, and disruptions to ecosystem services. The increasing agricultural, industrial, and urban demand for water resources puts further strain on rivers, leading to over-extraction, pollution, and degradation. Conflicting interests between water consumers, such as farmers, hydroelectric power companies, and conservationists, make it difficult to find solutions that balance the needs of different stakeholders. Despite these challenges, there is currently no comprehensive assessment of the status of the world's large rivers. The research presented in this Special Issue is intended to shed light on global changes that have occurred in large rivers in recent decades, and to provide valuable insights into potential solutions for improved management of these vital water bodies.

Prof. Dr. Helmut Habersack
Dr. Michael Tritthart
Dr. Christoph Hauer
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • world’s large rivers
  • climate change
  • changing environment
  • adaptation strategies

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 1690 KiB  
Article
Flushing Efficiency of Run-of-River Hydropower Plants: Novel Approaches Based on Physical Laboratory Experiments
by Thomas Gold, Kevin Reiterer, Christoph Hauer, Helmut Habersack and Christine Sindelar
Water 2023, 15(14), 2657; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15142657 - 22 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1224
Abstract
Periodic flushing operations during moderate flood events (≤annual flood flow HQ1) are an approach to counteract problems caused by disturbed sediment continuity in rivers, which is possibly an effect of run-of-river hydropower plants (RoR-HPPs). Considering ecology, flood risk, technical, and economical [...] Read more.
Periodic flushing operations during moderate flood events (≤annual flood flow HQ1) are an approach to counteract problems caused by disturbed sediment continuity in rivers, which is possibly an effect of run-of-river hydropower plants (RoR-HPPs). Considering ecology, flood risk, technical, and economical reasons, discharge values of 0.7 × HQ1 are a good reference point for the initiation of gate operations. This work aimed to investigate the role of different gate opening actions on the effectiveness of such flushing measures. Physical model tests were performed, to capture bed load rates, together with 2D velocity measurements in the vicinity of two movable radial gates above a fixed weir. The length scale of the idealized model arrangement was 1:20, and a conveyor-belt sediment feeder was used to supply a heterogeneous sediment mixture. Velocities were acquired using 2D laser doppler velocimetry (LDV). Based on the LDV measurements, mean velocity profiles and Reynolds stresses were derived. The full opening of both radial gates led to the highest bed load mobility. While the flushing efficiency drastically decreased, even for slightly submerged gates, an asymmetrical gate opening initially led to the formation of a flushing cone in the vicinity of the weir, accompanied by temporarily high flushing efficiency. In conclusion, our results stress the importance of full drawdowns in successfully routing incoming bed load downstream of the HPP. However, the combination of an asymmetric gate opening followed by a full drawdown could be a promising approach to further improve the flushing efficiency of RoR-HPPs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rivers - Connecting Mountains and Coasts)
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