Smart Water Management and Flood Mitigation

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management, Policy and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (9 June 2022) | Viewed by 17186

Special Issue Editors

Institut Mines Telecom Lille Douai 941, rue Charles Bourseul, 59508 Douai, France
Interests: large-scale systems – hydrographical systems; reactive control strategies; supervision and prognosis; identification
Department of Maritime and Transport Technology, Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology, 2628CD Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: large-scale systems management; real-time control of water networks; optimization-based control and state estimation; fault detection and localization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Water will focus on flood mitigation strategies for open-channel systems based on water flow forecasting, simulation, and control. Several approaches based on artificial intelligence (AI), operations research (OR), and automatic control (AC) are sufficiently mature to develop intelligent management systems to address flood mitigation challenges. An accurate forecast of water entries caused by rain events, based on predictive models, could be helpful to optimize water distribution among the hydraulic network and the available storage areas. Moreover, this should limit the degree of uncertainty that must be compensated using robust, stochastic, and/or learning-based control techniques to fulfill the operational goals. Accurate simulations based on digital twins (DT) of hydrographical networks aim to improve decision tools for managers, allowing to i) analyze past events and guarantee the return of experience, ii) design and test advanced control and optimization approaches, iii) determine the robustness to uncertainties, and iv) anticipate extreme events that might lead to floods. Although this Special Issue may appear to be broad in scope, contributions in all these specific fields are required to design complete flood mitigation strategies.

The Guest Editors are seeking papers that tackle the issue of flood mitigation in open-channel systems, and which deal with runoff forecasts, use of DT as simulation tools, and optimal and predictive control strategies (possibly dealing with uncertainty) for sustainable water resource management. Submissions addressing any of these topics or connecting different approaches using a conceptual framework are encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Eric Duviella
Dr. Pablo Segovia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • large-scale complex systems – open-channel systems
  • water management – flood mitigation
  • predictive modeling – rainfall/runoff models, identification, bayesian models
  • model predictive and optimization-based control – decentralized and distributed control, data-based control, intelligent decision support systems
  • computational intelligence in control – reinforcement learning, stochastic
  • digital implementation – digital twin, simulation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 4622 KiB  
Article
Here Comes the Flood, but Not Failure? Lessons to Learn after the Heavy Rain and Pluvial Floods in Germany 2021
by Alexander Fekete and Simone Sandholz
Water 2021, 13(21), 3016; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213016 - 27 Oct 2021
Cited by 84 | Viewed by 12132
Abstract
Floods are a known natural hazard in Germany, but the amount of precipitation and ensuing high death toll and damages after the events especially from 14 to 15 July 2021 came as a surprise. Almost immediately questions about failure in the early warning [...] Read more.
Floods are a known natural hazard in Germany, but the amount of precipitation and ensuing high death toll and damages after the events especially from 14 to 15 July 2021 came as a surprise. Almost immediately questions about failure in the early warning chains and the effectiveness of the German response emerged, also internationally. This article presents lessons to learn and argues against a blame culture. The findings are based on comparisons with findings from previous research projects carried out in the Rhein-Erft Kreis and the city of Cologne, as well as on discussions with operational relief forces after the 2021 events. The main disaster aspects of the 2021 flood are related to issuing and understanding warnings, a lack of information and data exchange, unfolding upon a situation of an ongoing pandemic and aggravated further by critical infrastructure failure. Increasing frequencies of flash floods and other extremes due to climate change are just one side of the transformation and challenge, Germany and neighbouring countries are facing. The vulnerability paradox also heavily contributes to it; German society became increasingly vulnerable to failure due to an increased dependency on its infrastructure and emergency system, and the ensuing expectations of the public for a perfect system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Water Management and Flood Mitigation)
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16 pages, 1618 KiB  
Article
Design of a MATLAB HEC-RAS Interface to Test Advanced Control Strategies on Water Systems
by Ronan Deshays, Pablo Segovia and Eric Duviella
Water 2021, 13(6), 763; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13060763 - 11 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4173
Abstract
The software package HEC-RAS (Hydrologic Engineering Center’s River Analysis System) is widely used by the water engineering community to analyze hydraulic systems and perform development planning. Furthermore, it integrates a control module that allows implementing basic controllers. For more complex approaches, developers from [...] Read more.
The software package HEC-RAS (Hydrologic Engineering Center’s River Analysis System) is widely used by the water engineering community to analyze hydraulic systems and perform development planning. Furthermore, it integrates a control module that allows implementing basic controllers. For more complex approaches, developers from the automatic control and artificial intelligence (AI) communities usually design, implement, and test new algorithms using dedicated software such as MATLAB. However, models of hydraulic systems employed in MATLAB are often very simple. The main objective of the paper is to design a simulation architecture by coupling HEC-RAS with MATLAB, thus improving the accuracy of the dynamics of the hydraulic systems considered in the control simulations. The main feature of the MATLAB HEC-RAS interface design is that it allows one to execute customized code at regular time intervals during the simulation. In this way, closed-loop control and optimization algorithms can be implemented and tested. Moreover, the generic interface allows for any configuration of hydrographical systems. The proposed interface is presented in this paper, and the performance of the approach is demonstrated considering two case studies of different nature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Water Management and Flood Mitigation)
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