Special Issue "Extreme Value Analysis of Short-Duration Rainfall and Intensity–Duration–Frequency Models"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology and Hydrogeology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Hans Van de Vyver
Website
Guest Editor
Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, Uccle, Brussels B1180, Belgium
Interests: extreme value analysis; weather and climate extremes; IDF-models; spatial precipitation extremes; drought; past and future climate change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Extreme rainfall events have a large impact on society and can lead to loss of life and property, for example, by causing landslides or flooding due to dike breach or dam failures. For planning, design, and operation of water resources projects, the estimation of flood risks often relies on the statistics of extreme precipitation.

The main aim is to develop methodologies and applications for the assessment of past and future characteristics of (short-duration) rainfall extremes. In particular, we welcome research findings in the form of intensity–duration–frequency (IDF) models. The research is not only relevant at the local scale, but also at the catchment or the global scales.

The research activities include a wide range of expertise, and may focus on (i) analysis of temporal or spatial trends in extreme rainfall intensities, (ii) the estimation of the impact of climate change on future climate IDF relationships, with associated uncertainties, (iii) the estimation of IDF curves at ungauged sites by means of spatial extreme value models, scale invariance properties, or any other methodology or framework, (iv) the conversion of IDF characteristics at the local scale to catchment-average rainfall intensity, (v) the use of alternative rainfall datasets, i.e., other than rain gauge measurements, such as remote sensing rainfall records, and (vi) any other advanced statistical methodology such as multivariate extreme value theory to estimate joint probabilities between extreme rainfall intensities and other meteorological conditions.

Dr. Hans Van de Vyver
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • intensity–duration–frequency curves
  • design storms
  • subdaily precipitation extremes
  • scale invariance
  • extreme value theory
  • past and future precipitation extremes
  • spatial extremes
  • downscaling
  • uncertainty analysis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Web-Based Tool for the Development of Intensity Duration Frequency Curves under Changing Climate at Gauged and Ungauged Locations
Water 2020, 12(5), 1243; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051243 - 27 Apr 2020
Abstract
Rainfall Intensity–Duration–Frequency (IDF) curves are among the most essential datasets used in water resources management across the globe. Traditionally, they are derived from observations of historical rainfall, under the assumption of stationarity. Change of climatic conditions makes use of historical data for development [...] Read more.
Rainfall Intensity–Duration–Frequency (IDF) curves are among the most essential datasets used in water resources management across the globe. Traditionally, they are derived from observations of historical rainfall, under the assumption of stationarity. Change of climatic conditions makes use of historical data for development of IDFs for the future unreliable, and in some cases, may lead to underestimated infrastructure designs. The IDF_CC tool is designed to assist water professionals and engineers in producing IDF estimates under changing climatic conditions. The latest version of the tool (Version 4) provides updated IDF curve estimates for gauged locations (rainfall monitoring stations) and ungauged sites using a new gridded dataset of IDF curves for the land mass of Canada. The tool has been developed using web-based technologies and takes the form of a decision support system (DSS). The main modifications and improvements between version 1 and the latest version of the IDF_CC tool include: (i) introduction of the Generalized Extreme value (GEV) distribution; (ii) updated equidistant matching algorithm (QM); (iii) gridded IDF curves dataset for ungauged location and (iv) updated Climate Models. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Dr. Rodrigo Marcelo Valdes, Dr. Roberto Pizarro Tapia, Dr. Fernando Gonzalez Leiva are interested in sending some of the studies they have done regarding IDF curves:

(1) Development of a Pluviograph's Strip Charts Reader to digitize rainfall intensity data in Chile. This is the result of a 4-year project.
(2) Recent and Historical trends of Daily Rainfall Intensity in Chile. This is a study under development.
(3) IDF.m A simple matlab-based tool o calculate IDF curves under changing conditions. The tool and the manuscript are done. 
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