Research on Nutrient Dynamics in Lakes

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydraulics and Hydrodynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2024) | Viewed by 2465

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
Interests: nitrogen; phosphorus; organic matter; dynamics; lake
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550081, China
Interests: nitrogen; phosphorus; organic matter; sediment; lake; reservoir
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Shandong Jianzhu University, Jinan 250101, China
Interests: sediment; lake; nitrogen; phosphorus; organic matter; heavy metal

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water pollution and eutrophication are the hot issues of lake protection and governance, especially the study of biogeochemical processes and dynamics of nitrogen, phosphorus, organic matter, and heavy metals. This Special Issue focuses on the study of lake trophic dynamics, including case studies and theoretical and methodological studies, among which new methods and advances in nutrient morphology and processes, interaction mechanisms, models and process simulations, and water–sediment–organism distribution and transport have attracted much attention. The purpose of this Special Issue is to provide a communication platform for scholars engaged in the study of lake nutrient geochemistry and dynamics.

Prof. Dr. Shengrui Wang
Dr. Jingfu Wang
Prof. Dr. Zhibin Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nitrogen
  • phosphorus
  • organic matter
  • heavy metal
  • dynamics
  • sediment
  • lake

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

28 pages, 12078 KiB  
Article
Water Budget for Lake Trafford, a Natural Subtropical Lake in South Florida: An Example of Enhanced Groundwater Influx in a Subtropical Lake Subsequent to Organic Sediment Dredging
by Serge Thomas, Mark A. Lucius, Jong-Yeop Kim, Edwin M. Everham III, Dana L. Dettmar and Thomas M. Missimer
Water 2024, 16(8), 1188; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16081188 - 22 Apr 2024
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Abstract
A very detailed water budget analysis was conducted on Lake Trafford in South Florida. The inflow was dominated by surface water influx via five canals (61%), with groundwater influx constituting 12% and direct rainfall constituting 27%. Lake discharge was dominated by sheet flow [...] Read more.
A very detailed water budget analysis was conducted on Lake Trafford in South Florida. The inflow was dominated by surface water influx via five canals (61%), with groundwater influx constituting 12% and direct rainfall constituting 27%. Lake discharge was dominated by sheet flow (69%) and evapotranspiration (30.5%), with groundwater recharge of the hydraulically connected unconfined aquifer accounting for only 0.5%. The removal of 30 M tons (4.4 × 106 m3) of organic sediment impacted the groundwater influx, causing enhanced groundwater flow into the deeper parts of the lake and mixed flow along the banks, creating a rather unusual pattern. The large number of groundwater seepage meters used during this investigation led to a very reliable set of measurements with occasional failure of only a few meters. A distinctive relationship was found between the wet-season lake stage, heavy rainfall events, and pulses of exiting sheet flow from the lake. Estimation of the evapotranspiration loss using data collected from a weather station on the lake allowed the use of three different models, which, when averaged, produced results comparable to Lake Okeechobee (South Florida). A limitation of this investigation was the inability to directly measure sheet-flow discharges, which had to be estimated as a residual within the calculated water budget. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Nutrient Dynamics in Lakes)
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15 pages, 3036 KiB  
Article
Effects of Dredging on Nitrogen and Phosphorus Storage Patterns and Retention Mechanisms in Column Core Sediments in the Caohai Region of Dianchi Lake
by Mingyan Liu, Yan Yang, Zhi Shao, Yaping Liu, Ziqi Wang, Zhengqing Chen, Mingang Chen, Lixin Jiao, Di Song, Jingyu Li and Jing Wang
Water 2024, 16(3), 449; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16030449 - 30 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1279
Abstract
Dredging is a common technique for managing eutrophication problems in waters, reducing the accumulation of pollutants by removing sediments from the bottom of water bodies. However, dredging can have complex impacts on lake ecosystems, and it is crucial to understand its benefits and [...] Read more.
Dredging is a common technique for managing eutrophication problems in waters, reducing the accumulation of pollutants by removing sediments from the bottom of water bodies. However, dredging can have complex impacts on lake ecosystems, and it is crucial to understand its benefits and mechanisms for the environment. In this paper, the dredged and undredged areas in the Caohai portion of Dianchi Lake were studied to analyze the effects of dredging on nitrogen–phosphorus transport and conversion and changes in nitrogen–phosphorus morphology content and its mechanisms by comparing the nitrogen–phosphorus morphology content and percentage, the nitrogen–phosphorus ratio, and the release contribution of the two areas. It was found that the ratio of stabilized nitrogen (SN) to stabilized phosphorus (SP) in the dredged area was lower than that in the undredged area and the BD-P and TOC content had a large turnaround at the 16–20 cm position of the sediment in the dredged area. The main conclusions were that the dredging would disrupt the internal equilibrium of the lake system for many years, with the greatest effect on the balance of the BD-P in the phosphorus forms of the sediment, and that the column cores of the dredged area at 0 to 16 cm might be newly accumulated sediments after the dredging project. However, with time, the distribution of nitrogen and phosphorus forms in the newly accumulated sediments will gradually reach a new equilibrium. In addition, dredging will also cause significant changes in the retention efficiency of nitrogen and phosphorus in the sediment, and the stable nitrogen and phosphorus forms will be released and transformed into unstable nitrogen and phosphorus forms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Nutrient Dynamics in Lakes)
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