Hydrology and Climate Change

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 4342

Special Issue Editor

Institute of Water and Flood Management (IWFM), Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET), Palashi, Dhaka 10000, Bangladesh
Interests: climate change; hydrology; flood management; remote sensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change affects both input and output components of the hydrological cycle. In response to the warming climate, the hydrological cycle is expected to intensify, resulting in the increased intensity and duration of extreme events such as floods, droughts, forest fires and heatwaves. Water is critical to life, and many of the effects of climate change on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are mediated through altered hydrology. This Special Issue of Water is devoted to promoting advances in global research into changes in precipitation and evapotranspiration patterns, the size of snow and glacier mass, soil moisture levels, rates of runoff and stream flow, meteorological/hydrological/ecological droughts, water scarcity, the impact of climate change on ecosystems, vulnerability assessment, advances in remote sensing technology for hydrological signatures, and adaption to climate change. Pertinent examples of topics for this Special Issue include the increase of agricultural and ecological droughts, flood risks assessment, changes in precipitation and hydrological processes, the integration of drones and remote sensing into environmental change monitoring, water conservation, integrated water resources management, climate resilience and sustainable development. All types of manuscripts (original research, review, etc.) are highly welcome.

Prof. Dr. A.K.M. Saiful Islam
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tends in heatwave, precipitation and evapotranspiration
  • changes in snow and glaciers mass
  • flood risks assessment and management
  • droughts and water scarcity
  • groundwater declinations
  • salinity intrusions
  • forest and bush fires
  • remote sensing
  • impact on ecosystems
  • vulnerability assessment
  • adaptation, resilience and sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 4386 KiB  
Article
Effects of Climate Change on Navigability Indicators of the Lower Athabasca River, Canada
Water 2023, 15(7), 1373; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15071373 - 03 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2028
Abstract
The lower Athabasca River (Canada) has experienced notable declines in streamflow and increasing oil sands development since the 1970s. This study investigates the potential impacts of climate change on navigability using both observed historical and projected future flows derived via hydrological simulations driven [...] Read more.
The lower Athabasca River (Canada) has experienced notable declines in streamflow and increasing oil sands development since the 1970s. This study investigates the potential impacts of climate change on navigability using both observed historical and projected future flows derived via hydrological simulations driven by an ensemble of statistically downscaled general circulation model climate data. Our use of proposed indices that form the Aboriginal Navigation Index (ANI) and a new index based on percentage over threshold (POT) occurrences yielded novel insights into anticipated changes to the flow regime. Comparisons of near (2041–2070) and far (2071–2100) future periods with the historical baseline (1981–2010) yielded results that project significant reductions in the 500 m3 s−1 POT during the fall navigability period spanning weeks 34 to 43, as well as reductions in the integrated ANIFall. These results indicate that challenging navigational conditions may become more frequent in the second half of the 21st century, not only during this fall period but also earlier into the summer, due to a shift in the flow regime, with potentially severe impacts on the users of the river channels. Our assessment approach is transferable to other regional study areas and should be considered in water management and environmental flow frameworks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrology and Climate Change)
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22 pages, 10713 KiB  
Article
The Large Rivers of the Past in West Siberia: Unknown Hydrological Regimen
Water 2023, 15(2), 258; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15020258 - 07 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1722
Abstract
The hydrological regime of large meandering rivers of the West Siberian Plain in the Late Pleniglacial/Late Glacial was reconstructed from the hydraulic geometry of palaeochannels. The main tools for the reconstruction were the power law relationship between channel bankfull width and mean maximum [...] Read more.
The hydrological regime of large meandering rivers of the West Siberian Plain in the Late Pleniglacial/Late Glacial was reconstructed from the hydraulic geometry of palaeochannels. The main tools for the reconstruction were the power law relationship between channel bankfull width and mean maximum discharge, taken in the downstream direction, and relationships between peak flood discharge and the contributing basin area. Reconstructed values of daily maximum surface runoff depth during the snow thaw period in the Late Pleniglacial/Late Glacial were 60–75 mm/day in the north of the plain with tundra and sparse forest and 20–40 mm/day in the south with periglacial steppe. The mean daily maximum surface runoff depth for the entirety of West Siberia was about 46 mm, which is more than five times greater than the modern value. Annual river runoff was calculated with the ratio between mean annual and mean maximum runoff depths, estimated for the modern region’s analogues of ancient periglacial landscapes and climates. Total annual flow of the Ob into the ocean was about 1000 km3. This is three times the current flow from the same basin, so the river was a significant source of fresh water to the Arctic Ocean during the last deglaciation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrology and Climate Change)
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