Special Issue "Interference Hydrology-Interference of Human Activities on Hydrological System"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 April 2023 | Viewed by 1090

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kaisheng Luo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing, China
Interests: interference hydrology; human activities; hydrological system; water cycle; land use/cover change; drought and flood; ecological conservation program; interference law; interference mechanism
Dr. Zhiyong Liu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Water Resources and Environment, School of Civil Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China
Interests: extreme climate dynamics associated with hydrological and underlying responses
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human activities and climate change are the two main drivers affecting water cycle change. Since the Quaternary, human interference in the global hydrological system has been increasingly intensified, much of which is thorough, profound and irreversible. The scale, duration, scope and input of current hydrological interference practice are unmatched at any time in the past.

However, compared with the hydrological effects of climate change, quantitative studies on the process and mechanism of human activities' impact on hydrological systems and their mutual feedback mechanism are relatively less popular, weak and scattered. The main reasons for this are likely to be the difficulty of quantifying human activities and the complexity of hydrological systems. Meanwhile, as human beings have subjective initiative, human activities have purpose, controllability and adaptability. However, the theory of human hydrological disturbance is far behind practice, and there is no systematic theory specifically used to guide human hydrological disturbance behavior. Therefore, there is an urgent need for cross-studies to systematically study the law of human activities' interference with hydrological systems and specifically to guide human hydrological interference behavior.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to quantitatively study the impact of human activities on hydrological processes and their mutual feedback relationship on the basis of quantifying human activities, to emphasize the importance of human activities on hydrological systems from the perspective of integrating natural and human social sciences, to strengthen the research on the quantitative impact of human activities on hydrological system interference, to promote the research process in this field and to improve its research paradigm. Meanwhile, it also provides strong support for humans to carry out and manage hydrological interference scientifically and rationally.

The Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, the following research topics:

1) Quantitative methods and spatial and temporal patterns of human activities;

2) Effects of water conservancy projects and ecological conservation programs on water balance elements and hydrological processes;

3) Responses and internal mechanisms of hydrological systems to various agricultural management activities;

4) Influence process and mechanism of land use change on hydrological processes, especially floods and droughts;

5) The influence and process of human psychological activities on hydrological disturbance behavior;

6) Socioeconomic, war and regional policies interfere with hydrological system pathways and conduction processes.

Dr. Kaisheng Luo
Dr. Zhiyong Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • interference hydrology
  • human activities
  • hydrological system
  • water cycle
  • land use/cover change
  • drought and flood
  • ecological conservation program
  • interference law
  • interference mechanism

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Unique Approach to Hydrological Behavior along the Bednja River (Croatia) Watercourse
Water 2023, 15(3), 589; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15030589 - 02 Feb 2023
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Abstract
Forecasting upstream flow amount based on downstream flow values is a new way of managing flood risk. This kind of prediction of the flow, size, and intensity of rivers in the alluvial aquifers is, in most cases, a challenging task due to climate [...] Read more.
Forecasting upstream flow amount based on downstream flow values is a new way of managing flood risk. This kind of prediction of the flow, size, and intensity of rivers in the alluvial aquifers is, in most cases, a challenging task due to climate change, as well as anthropogenic impacts on river flows. The presented methodology allows for organizing and preparing measures for flood protection, the operational work of hydropower plants, and many other usages. The methodology consists of correlation, cross-correlation, and a rescaled adjusted partial sums (RAPS) method. Although all methods are known, they have not been used in a methodology like the one presented. Research is conducted on a real case study of the river Bednja, on five consecutive hydrological measurement stations in the northwestern part of Croatia, for an available time series of the average daily flows from 2007–2018. High correlations were observed between the five stations along the Bednja River, with values of the correlation coefficient between 0.85 and 0.97 for the average daily flows, and between 0.88 and 0.99 for the RAPS values. The presented analysis gives information about similarities and connections between all five hydrological stations, which is significant and can be used to predict flow intensity. Full article
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Article
The Influence of Reservoirs on Water Temperature in the Downstream Part of an Open Watercourse: A Case Study at Botovo Station on the Drava River
Water 2022, 14(21), 3534; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14213534 - 03 Nov 2022
Viewed by 563
Abstract
The air temperature trends measured at the central meteorological station Varaždin and the water temperature measured at the Botovo station on the Drava River were analyzed from 1 January 1969 to 31 December 2021. Analyses were performed for three different time scales: year, [...] Read more.
The air temperature trends measured at the central meteorological station Varaždin and the water temperature measured at the Botovo station on the Drava River were analyzed from 1 January 1969 to 31 December 2021. Analyses were performed for three different time scales: year, month, and day. Mann–Kendall testing statistically determined the significant trends over the analyzed period and found increasing air and water temperatures. From 1975 to 1989, three reservoirs of different volumes and water surface areas were built. The Botovo water measuring station is 11 km from the third largest reservoir and 28 km from the mouth. Applying the day-to-day (DTD) method, we determined that the variations in the daily air temperatures are significantly higher than the simultaneous variations in the daily water temperatures. Also, the rise in water temperatures at the downstream water measuring station Botovo was influenced by the construction of reservoirs. The commissioning of the second reservoir in 1982 caused a significant rise in water temperature at the Botovo station. Trends in water temperature increase during all months of the year were statistically significant, while air temperature trends were statistically significant during the warm parts of the year. Full article
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