Anthropogenic and Geoenvironmental Impacts on the Hydrosphere: Diagnosis, Monitoring, Assessment, and Sustainable Management 2.0

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 5499

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Geoenvironmental Science and Environmental Quality Assurance, Department of Civil Engineering, University of West Attica, 250 Thivon & Petrou Ralli Str, Egaleo, 122 41 Athens, Greece
Interests: aquatic geochemistry; water quality; environmental geochemistry; geochemistry; geochemical modeling; contaminants transport; groundwater contamination; water quality indices; environmental monitoring and assessment; human health risk assessment
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Anthropogenic activities and geoenvironmental processes have drastic effects on the hydrosphere, while it is often rather difficult to distinguish a geoenvironmental signature from one induced by anthropogenic activities. Anthropogenic and geoenvironmental adverse effects on the hydrosphere are a global problem that directly impacts human health, water resources, food security, wildlife, biodiversity, and ecosystems. Anthropogenic influences on the hydrosphere include altered land use, pollution, and industrial, agricultural, and mining activities. Geoenvironmental impacts on the hydrosphere include effects related, among others, to geological processes, natural disasters, leaching from the soil, weathering of rocks and sediments, geochemical processes, and biological processes in the aquatic environment.

The hydrosphere faces a host of severe threats, including pollution, eutrophication, geological hazards, extreme temperatures, sea-level rise, soil erosion, wildfires, hurricanes, typhoons, monsoons, sand storms, floods, landslides, rockfalls, debris flows, mudflows, atmospheric deposition, infrastructure failures, technological accidents, land-use changes, mining and industrial activities, agricultural activities, livestock farming, and overuse of water resources. Thus, manuscripts related to these aspects and case studies are more than welcome in this Special Issue.

The goal and the scope of this Special Issue are to build up an impactful database and to share knowledge on cutting-edge topics related to delineating effects of natural and anthropogenic factors on the hydrosphere, distinguishing geoenvironmental from anthropogenic signatures in the hydrosphere, as well as presenting modern methods and approaches for monitoring, assessing, and protecting the hydrosphere.

This Special Issue focuses on, but is not limited to, the following aspects:

  • Natural and anthropogenic factors controlling water quality;
  • Water contamination, water suitability and use, water quality management;
  • Natural disasters and phenomena that affect hydrosphere;
  • Geochemical and biological processes in the aquatic environment;
  • Water-related impacts on human, wildlife, biodiversity, wetlands and ecosystems;
  • Changes of land use and threats on the hydrosphere;
  • Overuse of water resources;
  • Advanced tools and techniques for monitoring and evaluating water quality, Earth observation, spatial analysis, and biomonitoring.

Prof. Dr. Dimitrios E. Alexakis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • freshwater, marine water, surface water, and groundwater
  • sediment–soil–water interactions
  • soil–water system
  • nutrients, trace elements
  • pollutants
  • eutrophication
  • water quality and quantity
  • water quality management
  • monitoring, earth observation, use of sensors, and biomonitoring

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 8039 KiB  
Article
Morphological Variation between Life and Death Gastropod Populations in the Nile Delta: A Pollution-Induced Evolution
by Ahmed Awad Abdelhady, Ali M. Husain, Mohamed Samy-Kamal, Mohamed S. Ahmed, Dimitrios E. Alexakis and Ahmed Ali
Water 2023, 15(23), 4078; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15234078 - 24 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 906
Abstract
Wetland ecosystems of the Nile Delta face severe threats due to natural climatic changes and anthropogenic activities. Life and death assemblage comparisons can be implemented as a historical record to detect anthropogenic-induced environmental changes in the past few decades. A geometric morphometric approach [...] Read more.
Wetland ecosystems of the Nile Delta face severe threats due to natural climatic changes and anthropogenic activities. Life and death assemblage comparisons can be implemented as a historical record to detect anthropogenic-induced environmental changes in the past few decades. A geometric morphometric approach was applied to quantify the pollution-induced morphological variation between life and death populations of the gastropod Melanoides tuberculata. The results indicated that life populations differ significantly from the death ones, where the first tend to be much smaller, more globular, and with a depressed aperture and whorl section. In addition, the phenetic diversity of the life populations was also decreased, and the allometric growth was shifted. These morphological changes in the life populations are well-known adaptations for reducing the cost of shell maintenance in polluted water. No distinct morphospace was found between life populations from different habitats, suggesting that habitats have no significant role in the current pollution-induced evolution. Full article
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30 pages, 9620 KiB  
Article
Risk Assessment and Mapping of Flash Flood Vulnerable Zones in Arid Region, Fujairah City, UAE-Using Remote Sensing and GIS-Based Analysis
by P. Subraelu, Alaa Ahmed, Abdel Azim Ebraheem, Mohsen Sherif, Shaher Bano Mirza, Fouad Lamghari Ridouane and Ahmed Sefelnasr
Water 2023, 15(15), 2802; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15152802 - 2 Aug 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4099
Abstract
A flash flood is the most common natural hazard that endangers people’s lives, the economy, and infrastructure. Watershed management and planning are essential for reducing flood damages, particularly in residential areas, and mapping flash flood-sensitive zones. Flash flooding is an interface dynamic between [...] Read more.
A flash flood is the most common natural hazard that endangers people’s lives, the economy, and infrastructure. Watershed management and planning are essential for reducing flood damages, particularly in residential areas, and mapping flash flood-sensitive zones. Flash flooding is an interface dynamic between geoterrain system factors such as geology, geomorphology, soil, drainage density, slope, and flood, rather than only water movement from higher to lower elevation. Consequently, the vulnerability to flash floods necessitates an awareness of and mapping topographical features. A flash flood vulnerable zones (FFVZ) map is essential for thorough flash flood risk assessment and management to minimize its detrimental effects, particularly in residential areas, especially in cities like Fujairah with seven wadis flowing into the city and even though it has two main dams and fifteen breaker dams. So, in this work, eight satellite image-derived parameters rainfall, elevation, slope, land use/land cover (LULC), drainage density, geology, geomorphology, and soil were combined to predict the flash flood-vulnerable zones using a weighted overlay technique based on geographic information systems (GIS). Each element of the thematic maps is ranked and weighted according to how vulnerable it is to flash floods in the study area, with 55 km2 being classified as a very highly vulnerable area, 78 km2 as a high-risk area, 9.3 km2 as a moderate risk area, 70 km2 as a low vulnerable area, and 257 km2 as a very low vulnerable area. In addition, places with a very high vulnerability level include the Fujairah Airport, Fujairah Port, some residential neighborhoods in the city’s center, oil storage areas, two hospitals, and universities. Additionally, from 1990 to the present, Landsat and Sentinel 2 data showed consistent changes in vegetation and built-up areas. Therefore, in addition to helping policy and decision-makers make the best choices about the efficacy of the study area’s protective structures against the risk of flash floods in the future, the results can also be a valuable source of information. Full article
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