Special Issue "Comparative Studies in Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation across Species"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. L.C. Louis Penning
Website
Guest Editor
Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM Utrecht, The Netherlands
Interests: molecular biology of on liver; cartilage and pituitary diseases; regeneration in companion animals
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For ages, stem cell biology was mainly haematopietic stem cells (HSCs) biology. These cells were the founder cells of most cell types in mammalian blood, and HSC transplantation has already been in practice for decades. Then, in the 1980s and 1990s, embryonic stem (ES) cells became players in the stem cell field. Derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, these pluripotent cells were responsible for the differentiation of cells, forming endodermal, ectodermal and mesodermal cell lineages. This boosted hope for the clinical applications of these cells to replace damaged cells in diseased tissues. Ethical issues, amongst others, hampered the investigations of these cells in the field of regenerative medicine (RM), but ES-cells were instrumental to make knock-out mice, a situation that still is of crucial importance in biomedicine. The ethical limitations were suddenly overcome by the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) in August 2006 by the group of Yamanaka (Cell 2006). Overexpression of four factors (Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc) in differentiated skin fibroblasts resulted in cells that regained their pluripotency and, indeed, could be differentiated into cells of the three lineages. Therefore, disease-specific cell systems (for disease modeling) and autologous cell transplantation became realistic goals.

Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) give rise to adipocyte, chondrocyte, and osteocytic cell types. At the same time, organ-specific stem cells, with even more restricted differentiation potential (e.g., bipotent liver stem cells can differentiate into hepatocytes or cholangiocytes), were discovered in numerous organs. Finally, it turned out that single stem cells from intestine, stomach, lung and liver could be cultured as 3D mini-organs, with the various cell types of specific organs, the so-called organoids.

Most of these cell types are well-described in fundamental murine models and/or from human origin. This Special Issue of Veterinary Science provides professionals in veterinary medicine with an update on the knowledge of stem cell biology in veterinary medicine, and will address the potentials and drawbacks of the rapidly evolving field of veterinary stem cell biology.

Dr. L.C. (Louis) Penning
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • embryonic stem cells (ES)
  • induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS)
  • multipotent stromal cells = mesenchymal stem cells (MSC)
  • adult stem cells = organ specific stem cells

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Intestinal Organoids—Current and Future Applications
Vet. Sci. 2016, 3(4), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci3040031 - 21 Oct 2016
Cited by 7
Abstract
Recent technical advances in the stem cell field have enabled the in vitro generation of complex structures resembling whole organs termed organoids. Most of these approaches employ culture systems that allow stem cell-derived or tissue progenitor cells to self-organize into three-dimensional (3D)-structures. Since [...] Read more.
Recent technical advances in the stem cell field have enabled the in vitro generation of complex structures resembling whole organs termed organoids. Most of these approaches employ culture systems that allow stem cell-derived or tissue progenitor cells to self-organize into three-dimensional (3D)-structures. Since organoids can be grown from different species (human, mouse, cat, dog), organs (intestine, kidney, brain, liver), and from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells, they create significant prospects for modelling development and diseases, for toxicology and drug discovery studies, and in the field of regenerative medicine. Here, we report on intestinal stem cells, organoid culture, organoid disease modeling, transplantation, specifically covering the current and future uses of this exciting new insight model to the field of veterinary medicine. Full article
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