Special Issue "Escherichia coli Pathogenesis in Animal and Human Disease"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. A. Mahdi Saeed
Website
Guest Editor
College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, 1129 Farm Lane, Room 165, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
Interests: Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC); heat stable enterotoxin (STa); diarrheal disease; calf scour; traveler diarrhea; STa- based vaccines; therapeutic approaches

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am herewith inviting you to contribute to the Special Issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381) "Escherichia coli Pathogenesis in Animal and Human Disease" via submitting a manuscript that reflects your research activities in this topic. The manuscript can be on any of the broad aspects of the pathogenesis of diseases in humans and animals that are caused by the several classes of Escherichia coli.

I am certain that you agree with me that this topic deserves an appropriate coverage by experts like you so that the many aspects of the disease will be better presented to the scientific community, health agencies, and the public at large.

Please follow the instructions that will be provided to you by the staff of the editorial office of the journal.

Prof. Dr. A. Mahdi Saeed
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Enteropathogenic E. coli
  • Enterotoxigenic E. coli
  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome
  • Diarrheal disease
  • Traveler diarrhea
  • Calf scour
  • Piglet scour

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Competition among Escherichia coli Strains for Space and Resources
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(4), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5040093 - 02 Nov 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a subgroup of E. coli causing human diseases. Methods to control STEC in livestock and humans are limited. These and other emerging pathogens are a global concern and novel mitigation strategies are required. Habitats populated by bacteria [...] Read more.
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a subgroup of E. coli causing human diseases. Methods to control STEC in livestock and humans are limited. These and other emerging pathogens are a global concern and novel mitigation strategies are required. Habitats populated by bacteria are subjected to competition pressures due to limited space and resources but they use various strategies to compete in natural environments. Our objective was to evaluate non-pathogenic E. coli strains isolated from cattle feces for their ability to out-compete STEC. Competitive fitness of non-pathogenic E. coli against STEC were assessed in competitions using liquid, agar, and nutrient limiting assays. Winners were determined by enumeration using O-serogroup specific quantitative PCR or a semi-quantitative grading. Initial liquid competitions identified two strong non-pathogenic competitors (O103F and O26E) capable of eliminating various STEC including O157 and O111. The strain O103F was dominant across permeable physical barriers for all tested E. coli and STEC strains indicating the diffusion of antimicrobial molecules. In direct contact and even with temporal disadvantages, O103F out-competed STEC O157E. The results suggest that O103F or the diffusible molecule(s) it produces have a potential to be used as an alternative STEC mitigation strategy, either in medicine or the food industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Escherichia coli Pathogenesis in Animal and Human Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Comparative Pathogenicity of Wildlife and Bovine Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains in Experimentally Inoculated Neonatal Jersey Calves
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(4), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5040088 - 15 Oct 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, like E. coli O157:H7, are important human and animal pathogens. Naturally-acquired E. coli O157:H7 infections occur in numerous species but, particularly, cattle have been identified as a significant reservoir for human cases. E. coli O157:H7 are isolated from [...] Read more.
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, like E. coli O157:H7, are important human and animal pathogens. Naturally-acquired E. coli O157:H7 infections occur in numerous species but, particularly, cattle have been identified as a significant reservoir for human cases. E. coli O157:H7 are isolated from a number of domestic and wild animals, including rodents that share a living space with cattle. These Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 strains can be highly virulent in humans, but little is known about the sequelae of interspecies transfer. In a group of neonatal calves, we determined the differences in colonization patterns and lesions associated with infection using either a wildlife or bovine E. coli O157:H7 strain. In calves challenged with the wildlife E. coli O157:H7 strain, the large (descending) colon was solely colonized, which differed substantially from the calves inoculated with the bovine E. coli O157:H7 strain, where the spiral colon was the principal target of infection. This study also demonstrated that while both interspecies- and intraspecies-derived E. coli O157:H7 can infect young calves, the distribution and severity differs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Escherichia coli Pathogenesis in Animal and Human Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop