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Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(4), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5040088

Comparative Pathogenicity of Wildlife and Bovine Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains in Experimentally Inoculated Neonatal Jersey Calves

1
Department of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2
Western Institute for Food Safety and Security, University of California, Davis, CA 95618, USA
3
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
4
College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 August 2018 / Revised: 11 October 2018 / Accepted: 12 October 2018 / Published: 15 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Escherichia coli Pathogenesis in Animal and Human Disease)
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Abstract

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, like E. coli O157:H7, are important human and animal pathogens. Naturally-acquired E. coli O157:H7 infections occur in numerous species but, particularly, cattle have been identified as a significant reservoir for human cases. E. coli O157:H7 are isolated from a number of domestic and wild animals, including rodents that share a living space with cattle. These Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 strains can be highly virulent in humans, but little is known about the sequelae of interspecies transfer. In a group of neonatal calves, we determined the differences in colonization patterns and lesions associated with infection using either a wildlife or bovine E. coli O157:H7 strain. In calves challenged with the wildlife E. coli O157:H7 strain, the large (descending) colon was solely colonized, which differed substantially from the calves inoculated with the bovine E. coli O157:H7 strain, where the spiral colon was the principal target of infection. This study also demonstrated that while both interspecies- and intraspecies-derived E. coli O157:H7 can infect young calves, the distribution and severity differs. View Full-Text
Keywords: Interspecies transfer; intraspecies transfer; bovine; wildlife; Escherichia coli O157:H7 Interspecies transfer; intraspecies transfer; bovine; wildlife; Escherichia coli O157:H7
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Antaki-Zukoski, E.M.; Li, X.; Pesavento, P.A.; Nguyen, T.H.B.; Hoar, B.R.; Atwill, E.R. Comparative Pathogenicity of Wildlife and Bovine Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains in Experimentally Inoculated Neonatal Jersey Calves. Vet. Sci. 2018, 5, 88.

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