Advances in Animal Embryonic Development and Genetic Diseases

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Reproduction and Obstetrics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 3817

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Anatomy Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Thessaly, 43131 Karditsa, Greece
Interests: animal osteology; developmental malformations of the animals; avian anatomy; morphological characteristics of the body of the productive animals and their relation with productive traits; embryonic development of avian skeleton
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The embryonic development of animal organisms has been and continues to be an essential component of Biology and Veterinary Medical science. For scientists, the curiosity of what happens inside the uterus of mammals or within the avian egg is always challenging to perceive or even imagine. This intriguing process has very important implications for the life of the animals.

Generally, both normal and abnormal development are products of both genetic and environmental factors. These genetic and environmental factors can be single or multiple in nature. Interactions between the environment and genes may confuse matters further. In addition, a number of genetic or environmental factors may produce the same abnormality. For these reasons, one must be aware of the complex principles of normal development and how they may be disturbed before attempting a methodological approach to solve etiology and manage the condition. In this Special Issue we aim to improve knowledge concerning the novelties of embryonic development and  genetic diseases. The considerable challenge posed by genetic disorders and congenital abnormalities calls for the continuation of research.

Dr. Aris Pourlis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ontogeny
  • malformation
  • genetic defect
  • hereditary defect
  • developmental defect

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

17 pages, 4884 KiB  
Review
Characterizing and Eliminating the Inbreeding Load
by István Nagy and Thi Anh Nguyen
Vet. Sci. 2024, 11(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci11010008 - 22 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1522
Abstract
The authors evaluated the relevant literature related to purging, which is the interaction between selection and inbreeding in which the population may eliminate its inbreeding load at least partially. According to the relevant literature, the inbreeding load and the process of purging were [...] Read more.
The authors evaluated the relevant literature related to purging, which is the interaction between selection and inbreeding in which the population may eliminate its inbreeding load at least partially. According to the relevant literature, the inbreeding load and the process of purging were evaluated via pedigree methods based on ancestral inbreeding, the inbreeding–purging model, and expressed opportunity of purging, along with genomic methods. Most ancestral inbreeding-related studies were performed in zoos, where only a small proportion of the studied populations show signs of purging. The inbreeding–purging model was developed with Drosophila, and it was used to evaluate different zoo ungulates and Pannon white rabbits. Purging was detected in both studies. The expressed opportunity of purging was applied in Jersey cattle and Pannon white rabbits. In the Jersey cattle, it had an effect of 12.6% for fitness, while in the Pannon white rabbits, the inbreeding load was between 40% and 80% of its original value. The genomic studies also signalled purging, but they also made it clear that, contrary to the detected purging, the evaluated populations still suffered from inbreeding depression. Therefore, especially for domesticated animals, it can be concluded that deliberate inbreeding with the purpose of generating purging is not advocated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Animal Embryonic Development and Genetic Diseases)
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14 pages, 5479 KiB  
Review
Overview of Swine Congenital Malformations Associated with Abnormal Twinning
by Aris Pourlis, Georgios I. Papakonstantinou, Dimitrios Doukas and Vasileios G. Papatsiros
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(9), 534; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10090534 - 23 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1650
Abstract
A review of congenital malformations in swine relating to abnormal twinning was carried out. The aim was to describe and estimate these defects. Among the recorded twins, the most common defect was the syncephalus thoracopagus or cephalothoracopagus. A couple of dicephali and [...] Read more.
A review of congenital malformations in swine relating to abnormal twinning was carried out. The aim was to describe and estimate these defects. Among the recorded twins, the most common defect was the syncephalus thoracopagus or cephalothoracopagus. A couple of dicephali and diprosopus congenital anomalies were also registered. At last, some cases of thoraco-omphalopagus piglets were surveyed. There was also a report of an acardiac twin (hemiacardius acephalus) and a case of a conjoined parasitic twin. The pathogenetic mechanisms of this condition, frequently reported in veterinary practice, are discussed. The importance of embryonic imperfect twinning is commonly associated with dystocia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Animal Embryonic Development and Genetic Diseases)
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