Special Issue "Sustainable Place Making and Urban Governance"

A special issue of Urban Science (ISSN 2413-8851).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Michael Peter Smith

Distinguished Research Professor of Community Studies, Department of Human Ecology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616-8701, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-510-644-1954
Interests: urban theory; transnationalism; global migration; urban politics and policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This is a Special Issue of high quality papers (original research articles or comprehensive review papers) in open access format, by the Editorial Board Members, or the Guest Editors, of Urban Science. Papers will be published, free of charge, after peer review. The topics include, but are not limited to, the following items:

  • urban and regional economic and political development
  • urban environmental and resource controversies
  • urban policy and governance
  • urban sprawl and redevelopment
  • urbanism and suburbanism as ways of life
  • urban geography, land use, transport and mobility
  • landscape and urban wilderness
  • infrastructure, the built environment, and housing
  • community formation in cities
  • urban culture
  • rural development
  • the costs and benefits of tourism
  • globalization and local development
  • neighborhood sustainability
  • urban sustainability, assessment, planning, design, and development
  • place making

Prof. Dr. Michael Smith
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Urban Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Solving Traffic Congestion through Street Renaissance: A Perspective from Dense Asian Cities
Urban Sci. 2019, 3(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci3010018
Received: 30 December 2018 / Revised: 12 January 2019 / Accepted: 26 January 2019 / Published: 29 January 2019
PDF Full-text (334 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Traffic congestion is one of the most vexing city problems and involves numerous factors which cannot be addressed without a holistic approach. Congestion cannot be narrowly tackled at the cost of a city’s quality of life. Focusing on transport and land use planning, [...] Read more.
Traffic congestion is one of the most vexing city problems and involves numerous factors which cannot be addressed without a holistic approach. Congestion cannot be narrowly tackled at the cost of a city’s quality of life. Focusing on transport and land use planning, this paper examines transport policies and practices on both the supply and demand sides and finds that indirect travel demand management might be the most desirable solution to this chronic traffic ailment. The concept of absorption of traffic demand through the renaissance of streets as a way for traffic relief is introduced from two perspectives, with some examples from dense Asian urban contexts to demonstrate this. Firstly, jobs–housing balance suggests the return of production activities to residential areas and sufficient provision of diverse space/housing options to deal with work-related traffic. The second approach is to promote the street as a multi-activity destination rather than a thoroughfare to access dispersed daily needs, and to advocate more street life to diminish non-commuting traffic. Based on this, suggestions for better transport planning policies are put forward. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Place Making and Urban Governance)
Open AccessArticle
Measuring Neighborhood Quality of Life: Placed-Based Sustainability Indicators in Freiburg, Germany
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(4), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2040106
Received: 17 September 2018 / Revised: 22 October 2018 / Accepted: 26 October 2018 / Published: 29 October 2018
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Abstract
There has been a recent upswing of academic interest in the social dimensions of sustainable cities, especially the dynamics of Quality of Life (QoL), Environmental Equity, Ecosystem Services, Eco-Friendliness, Public Engagement, and Well-Being and Happiness Indicators. These factors are only now being evaluated [...] Read more.
There has been a recent upswing of academic interest in the social dimensions of sustainable cities, especially the dynamics of Quality of Life (QoL), Environmental Equity, Ecosystem Services, Eco-Friendliness, Public Engagement, and Well-Being and Happiness Indicators. These factors are only now being evaluated as critical aspects of sustainable place-making and community development. This paper explores the social dimensions of neighborhood development in what some believe to be one of the most sustainable cities—Freiberg, Germany. We look at two neighborhoods that were specifically designed and built with sustainability principles and practices at their core. The authors surveyed residents of these neighborhoods to measure their levels of well-being, satisfaction with place, and other important QoL factors. Quantitative data was ascertained from residents using a survey questionnaire. The results show a high correlation between QoL factors as a function of place-making and sustainability practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Place Making and Urban Governance)
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