Special Issue "Plastics (Macro-, Micro- and Nano-) as Vectors for Other Environmental Contaminants"

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Ecotoxicology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Vera Lúcia Maria
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology & CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: soil ecotoxicology; nanotoxicology; proteomics/metabolomics; antioxidant system/oxidative damage; nanoscale materials, including nanoplastics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ângela Barreto
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology & CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: aquatic ecotoxicology; emerging contaminants; mixtures of contaminants; genotoxicity; oxidative stress/damage; neurotransmission and behavioral endpoints
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The industrial production of plastics has exponentially increased since the 1940s due to their exceptional properties, such as their low density and high durability. However, these properties result in the elevated persistency of plastics in the environment. Micro- and nanoplastics are environmental contaminants that have received significant attention from the scientific community in the last few years. They originate from both intentional production and the breakdown of larger plastic items. Several studies demonstrated the persistent environmental contamination by microplastics, including major compartments, e.g., soil, sea, and freshwater. On the other hand, studies are increasingly reporting on the potential of both micro- and nanoplastics to interact with other contaminants and their negative impact on different organisms. However, until now, there is little and controversial information about this research topic.

Therefore, this Special Issue invites the submission of and intends to incorporate original research, case studies, or up-to-date review papers containing information about the role of plastics as vectors for other contaminants. In particular, it will welcome studies focused on specific issues:

- Evaluation of the ecotoxicity of different mixtures of plastics with other contaminants at the individual (e.g. survival, reproduction, and behavior), biochemical (e.g., DNA damage, oxidative stress and neurotransmission) and molecular (e.g., gene and protein expressions) levels;

- Ecotoxicity of these mixtures resultant from long-term exposures with special attention to multigenerational and/or transgenerational effects;

- Advances in the characterization and understanding of the biological interactions of these complexes mixtures and, therefore, biological effects;

- Abiotic characterization of these mixtures in the media of exposure (e.g., spiked soil/water) or in distinct environmental compartments;

 - Analytical methods to assess the potential binding/adsorption between plastics and the other contaminants in complex environmental contexts.

Dr. Vera Lúcia Maria
Dr. Ângela Barreto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plastic types
  • carriers
  • pollutants
  • aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems
  • biological effects
  • mode-of-action
  • ecological impact
  • chemical interactions
  • analytical methods

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Polystyrene Nanoplastics Can Alter the Toxicological Effects of Simvastatin on Danio rerio
Toxics 2021, 9(3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics9030044 - 26 Feb 2021
Abstract
Once in the environment, nanoplastics (NPls) may interact with other contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals, potentially acting as carriers and modulating their toxicity. Thus, the main aim of the current study is to investigate how polystyrene (PS) NPls (mean diameter: 60 nm) interact with [...] Read more.
Once in the environment, nanoplastics (NPls) may interact with other contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals, potentially acting as carriers and modulating their toxicity. Thus, the main aim of the current study is to investigate how polystyrene (PS) NPls (mean diameter: 60 nm) interact with simvastatin (SIM), an anticholesterolemic drug, and modulate its toxicity to zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. PS NPls were carboxyl group functionalized, to promote the interaction/binding of NPls with SIM (worst-case scenarios) and it was fluorescently dyed, allowing to detect the intake. Exposure was 96 h to 0–150 mg/L NPls or 0–150 µg/L SIM, as well as to dual combinations (NPls 0.015 or 1.5 mg/L and SIM 12.5 or 15 µg/L). PS NPls alone did not exert effects whereas SIM (≥ 12.5 µg/L) significantly delayed the hatching, decreased the heartbeat, induced edemas and mortality. The combination of NPls (1.5 mg/L) and SIM (12.5 or 15 µg/L) had significant effects on the survival of the organisms while the correspondent NPls and SIM single exposures did not have significant effects on this endpoint. Concerning the malformations appearance, SIM alone had similar effects than when in co-exposures (0.015 mg/L NPls plus 12.5 or 15 µg/L SIM). Hatching and heartbeat increased after the co-exposures SIM and NPls comparing with SIM single exposures, showing that 0.015 mg/L NPls plus 12.5 or 15 µg/L SIM did not cause significant effects on these endpoints. This study shows that NPls effects on bioavailability and toxicity of other contaminants cannot be ignored when assessing the environmental behavior and risks of NPls. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Polystyrene nanoplastics can alter the toxicological effects of simvastatin on Danio rerio
Authors: Angela Barreto; Joana Santos; Mónica J. B. Amorim; Vera L. Maria
Affiliation: Department of Biology & CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Abstract: Nanoplastics (NPls) are increasing in the environment due to the continuous release and consequent degradation of macro-/microplastics, being considered as contaminants of emerging concern. Once in the environment, NPls may interact with other contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals, potentially acting as carriers, and modulating their toxicity. Combined exposures of NPls and other toxicants have shown different results regarding toxicity to the organisms. Thus, the main aim of the current study is to investigate how polystyrene (PS) NPls (mean diameter: 60 nm) interact with simvastatin (SIM), an anticholesterolemic drug, and modulate its toxicity to zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. PS NPls were carboxyl group (COOH) functionalized, to promote the interaction/binding of NPls with SIM (worst-case scenarios) and it was fluorescently dyed, allowing to detect the intake. Exposure was 96 hours to 0 - 150 mg/L NPls or 0 - 150 µg/L SIM, as well as to dual combinations (NPls 0.015 or 1.5 mg/L and SIM 12.5 or 15 µg/L). PS NPls alone did not exert effects whereas SIM (≥12.5 µg/L) significantly delayed the hatching, decreased the heartbeat, induced edemas and mortality. The combination of NPls (1.5 mg/L) and SIM (12.5 or 15 µg/L) had significant effects on the survival of the organisms while the correspondent NPls and SIM single exposures did not have significant effects on this endpoint. Concerning the malformations appearance, SIM alone had similar effects than when in co-exposures (0.015 mg/L NPls plus 12.5 or 15 µg/L SIM). Hatching and heartbeat increased after the co-exposures SIM and NPls comparing with SIM single exposures, showing that 0.015 mg/L NPls plus 12.5 or 15 µg/L SIM did not cause significant effects on these endpoints. This study shows that NPls effects on bioavailability and toxicity of other contaminants cannot be ignored when we assess the environmental behavior and risks of NPls.

Back to TopTop