Special Issue "Persistent, Emerging, and Oil Pollutants in Marine Ecosystem and Human Health Risks"

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Atanu Sarkar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada
Interests: Environmental Health; Ecosystem Health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Persistent, emerging, and oil pollutants (PEOPs) in marine ecosystem are a threat to human health. Humans are exposed to such pollutants largely by eating contaminated sea foods. Industrial effluents, surface runoffs, and trans-atmospheric transport are the major sources of these pollutants. People working in industries are also vulnerable to various PEOPs due to occupational exposure. These pollutants are known to affect various human body systems, for example, the endocrine, nervous, and reproductive systems, and some are also known carcinogens. Fetuses and newborn infants are exposed to pollutants via the placenta and breast milk. The pollution of coastal ecosystems by PEOPs is a global phenomenon. However, there are very few studies linking PEOPs pollution of marine ecosystems to adverse effects on human health.

This Special Issue will focus on suitable research studies addressing PEOPs in marine ecosystems and related adverse human health impacts. Studies on all known PEOPs, such as PCBs, PBDEs, PFAS, TCDD, furan, etc. are of interest. They may include the assessments of ecotoxicological, occupational, immunologic, epigenetic, metabolic, clinical, epidemiological, public health effects, as well as environmental policy perspectives. Authors are invited and welcome to submit original research papers, reviews, and short communications

Dr. Atanu Sarkar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Persistent
  • Emerging
  • Oil Pollutants
  • Marine ecosystem
  • Occupational
  • Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Epigenetics
  • Toxicology
  • Immunologic
  • Policy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
North Pacific Baleen Whales as a Potential Source of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in the Diet of the Indigenous Peoples of the Eastern Arctic Coasts
Toxics 2019, 7(4), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics7040065 - 17 Dec 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1289
Abstract
Among marine mammals, gray and bowhead whales contain large amounts of fat and thereby constitute crucial dietary components of the traditional diet of indigenous peoples of the Eastern Arctic. Despite the high nutritional and cultural value of gray and bowhead whales, there is [...] Read more.
Among marine mammals, gray and bowhead whales contain large amounts of fat and thereby constitute crucial dietary components of the traditional diet of indigenous peoples of the Eastern Arctic. Despite the high nutritional and cultural value of gray and bowhead whales, there is a risk of persistent organic pollutant (POP) intake by indigenous individuals who use marine mammals as their main source of fat. POPs are lipophilic pollutants and are known to accumulate and magnify along the marine food web. Consumption of foods contaminated by POPs can perturb the endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems, and can potentially cause cancer. Moderate to relatively high concentrations of POPs have indeed been reported in the edible tissues of gray and bowhead whales consumed by indigenous peoples of the North Pacific Ocean. Even though their consumption is potentially harmful, there is no regular monitoring of eco-toxicants in the foods consumed by the indigenous peoples of the Eastern Arctic. In our view, the routine analyses of consumable parts of whales and of comparable nutritional items need to be included in the Russian Arctic Biomonitoring Programme. Full article
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