Special Issue "Novel Imaging Advances in Physiotherapy"

A special issue of Tomography (ISSN 2379-139X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 12 July 2024 | Viewed by 1413

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Juan Antonio Valera-Calero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
VALTRADOFI Research Group, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health, Universidad Camilo José Cela, Villanueva de la Cañada, 28692 Madrid, Spain
Interests: ultrasound imaging; neck pain; low back pain; myofascial pain syndromes; elastography; chronic pain; dry needling; manual therapy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physical therapists need imaging technology for a broad range of clinical, educational, and research purposes. For instance, ultrasound imaging is used in physiotherapy for diagnosis and monitor pathology (not infringing upon medical specialities competences and limiting our activity to the evaluation of morphological and functional aspects of musculoskeletal structures, such as tendons, ligaments, and muscles), as a rehabilitative tool used to provide biofeedback during physical tasks, as support tool for guiding percutaneous procedures (such as dry needling, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, or percutaneous electrolysis), and as a research tool for measuring the morphology (e.g., perimeter, thickness, distance, cross-sectional area, and volume) and histology (e.g., mean echo-intensity and fatty infiltration percentage) of musculoskeletal structures.

For this Special Issue, we invite researchers to contribute original research and reviews covering clinical, educational, and research uses of imaging techniques in the field of physiotherapy within the competences described above. Diagnostic accuracy studies assessing validity, specificity, reliability, and sensibility of imaging procedures; case-control studies assessing clinically relevant imaging outcomes; and experimental studies using imaging techniques as intervention or as main outcomes, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews are welcome.

Dr. Juan Antonio Valera-Calero
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tomography is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physiotherapy
  • ultrasound imaging
  • panoramic ultrasound
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • computed tomography
  • rehabilitation
  • musculoskeletal disorders
  • diagnostic accuracy study
  • reliability
  • validity

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Regression Model Decreasing the Risk of Femoral Neurovascular Bundle Accidental Puncture
Tomography 2022, 8(5), 2498-2507; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8050208 (registering DOI) - 01 Oct 2022
Viewed by 149
Abstract
Although most of the adverse events derived from dry needling are minor, avoiding potential hazards for patients including accidental invasion of vessels, ganglia, and nerves is essential to ensure patients’ safety. We aimed to investigate the contribution of predictors explaining the variance of [...] Read more.
Although most of the adverse events derived from dry needling are minor, avoiding potential hazards for patients including accidental invasion of vessels, ganglia, and nerves is essential to ensure patients’ safety. We aimed to investigate the contribution of predictors explaining the variance of sartorius muscle depth limit at proximal third and middle thigh as these locations lead to an augmented risk of neurovascular bundle invasion during dry needling application. A diagnostic study was conducted on 84 subjects to calculate the accuracy of a prediction model for sartorius depth, as assessed with ultrasound imaging, based on sex, age, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), thigh perimeter, and length. After calculating a correlation matrix, a multiple linear regression analysis was performed to detect those variables contributing to the sartorius deep limit in both locations. Although males showed greater thigh perimeter than women (p < 0.001), the deep limit of the sartorius muscle was significantly more superficial for both the proximal third (p = 0.003) and the mid-third (p = 0.004) points. No side-to-side anthropometric differences were found (p > 0.05). In addition, we found sartorius muscle depth to be associated with the proximal and mid-third girth, gender, height, and BMI (all, p < 0.01). Gender, proximal-third girth, and BMI explained 51.1% and 42.6% of the variance for the sartorius deep limit at the proximal and the mid-third, respectively. This study analyzed whether anthropometric features could predict sartorius muscle depth in healthy participants for assisting clinicians in choosing the optimal needle length to avoid accidental femoral bundle puncture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Imaging Advances in Physiotherapy)
Article
The Prevalence of Shoulder Disorders among Professional Bullfighters: A Cross-Sectional Ultrasonography Study
Tomography 2022, 8(4), 1726-1734; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8040145 - 04 Jul 2022
Viewed by 674
Abstract
We aimed to investigate clinical and ultrasound signs of shoulder overuse injuries in professional bullfighters; side-to-side differences (dominant vs. non-dominant); and to determine potential differences according to bullfighters’ categories. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted. Thirty professional and active bullfighters were assessed. A [...] Read more.
We aimed to investigate clinical and ultrasound signs of shoulder overuse injuries in professional bullfighters; side-to-side differences (dominant vs. non-dominant); and to determine potential differences according to bullfighters’ categories. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted. Thirty professional and active bullfighters were assessed. A bilateral ultrasound assessment of the subacromial bursa, long biceps head tendon (LHBT), and rotator cuff was performed to determine the presence of bursitis, subluxation, partial or total tendon rupture, tenosynovitis, or calcification. Supraspinatus tendon thickness was measured. Finally, a battery of clinical orthopedic tests (Yergason, Jobe, infraspinatus, Gerber, and bursa tests) were also performed. Most identified ultrasound findings were located in the dominant side, being the presence of bursitis (n = 9; 30%), LHBT tenosynovitis (n = 8; 26.7%), and subscapularis tendon calcification (n = 5; 16.7%) the most prevalent. No side-to-side or between-categories differences were found for supraspinatus tendon thickness (all, p > 0.05). The most frequent positive signs were the infraspinatus test (40.0%), Gerber lift-off test (33.3%), and bursitis, Jobe, and Yergason tests (all, 26.7%). Ultrasound signs were commonly found at LHBT, subacromial bursa, and rotator cuff in professional bullfighters without difference between categories and sides. No side-to-side or between-categories differences were found. Positive clinical test signs suggestive of bursitis, LHBT, and rotator cuff tendinopathy were frequently observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Imaging Advances in Physiotherapy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Structural, Functional and Neurochemical Cortical Brain Changes Associated with Chronic Low Back Pain
Tomography 2022, 8(5), 2153-2163; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8050180 - 25 Aug 2022
Viewed by 392
Abstract
Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the most prevalent musculoskeletal disorders, being one of the leading contributors to disability worldwide and involving an important economic and social burden. Up to 90% of CLBP is non-specific (not associated with specific injuries), with [...] Read more.
Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the most prevalent musculoskeletal disorders, being one of the leading contributors to disability worldwide and involving an important economic and social burden. Up to 90% of CLBP is non-specific (not associated with specific injuries), with a chronicity expectation estimated at 10%. Currently, motivational and emotional central circuits are being investigated due to their role in CLBP persistency and chronification. Therefore, this narrative review aimed to summarize the evidence regarding the cortical brain changes described for proposing novel multidisciplinary approaches. Novel advances in neuroimaging techniques demonstrated structural (e.g., decrease in the grey matter located at the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), functional (e.g., connectivity impairments in those areas involved in pain processing), and neurochemical changes (e.g., decrease in cerebral metabolites). In addition, significant changes were found in the primary somatosensory and motor cortex, contributing to the alteration of low back muscles activation and function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Imaging Advances in Physiotherapy)
Back to TopTop