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Special Issue "Sustainable Career Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 5647

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alexandros-Stamatios Antoniou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Education, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: organizational psychology and behavior; occupational health; career counselling and guidance; work values; leadership; career decision-making
Dr. Katerina Argyropoulou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Educational Studies, School of Philosophy, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: life-design and career- and self-management models; career decision-making; meta-capacities and career skills; reflexivity; career counselling; guidance
Dr. Nikos Drosos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, European University of Cyprus, Engomi, Cyprus
Interests: career counselling of socially vulnerable groups; social justice; career testing; life-design; career decision-making

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainable career development represents a new interdisciplinary research area in the field of psychology, counseling and career guidance. A sustainable career includes sufficient economic security, matching the individual’s career with their values, adapting to the evolving changes of individuals’ needs and interests, and renewal opportunities (McDonald and Hite, 2018). Linked to the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development (Di Fabio, 2017), it also emphasizes the need to support people to become experts in being flexible and adaptable, considering multiple career transitions and rapid societal changes (Newman, 2001). Sustainable careers consist of a set of opportunities for integration across individuals’ life spheres and experiences that create a sense of wholeness, completeness and meaning. This approach denotes the sequences of individuals’ different career experiences, reflected through a variety of patterns of continuity over time, crossing several social spaces they live in, and characterized by individual agency, herewith providing meaning to the individual (Van der Heijden and De Vos, 2015).

Sustainable career development is linked to people’s education, occupation or position and organizations, without, however, excluding anyone that could be supportive in the counselling process, by highlighting a primary prevention perspective (Di Fabio & Tsuda, 2018). This perspective refers to the promotion of an individual’s optimal response in their interaction with the environment by building and utilizing personal resources and forces that are useful for their personal and career development (Argyropoulou, Mouratoglou, Mikedaki and Charokopaki, 2020).

From a psychological perspective, sustainable career development attempts to contribute to individuals’ sustainability and sustainable development by facilitating their flourishing, in terms of not only interpersonal but also intrapersonal talents, for the benefit of the local community and broader societal progress (Di Fabio and Rosen, 2018; Lenart, 2016). In the context of career counseling and guidance, sustainable career development encourages the development of an appropriate framework, in which individuals may integrate issues that they are unaware of until today in their career decision-making; such issues may include a reflective process, self-knowledge and environmental awareness, social responsibility, career management skills and the balance between their life and career roles (Argyropoulou et al., 2020). In terms of the social environment, sustainable career development could respond to diversity and individual differences, reducing the range of systemic barriers to accessing the labor market and empowering people with the right resources to contribute effectively in the work context (Blustein et al., 2018).

This Special Issue is focused on the contribution that sustainable career development may add to the broader theme of sustainability and sustainable development, as manifested during psychological, counseling and social interventions. Hence, the aim of the present issue is to explore the topic of sustainable career development in relation to psychological, counseling and social implications. The Special Issue will seek to collect and present innovative theoretical contributions, practical reflections for practitioners and the results of empirical research on this topic.

Dr. Alexandros-Stamatios Antoniou
Dr. Katerina Argyropoulou
Dr. Nikos Drosos
Guests Editors

References:

Argyropoulou, K., Mouratoglou, N., Antoniou, A.-S., Mikedaki, K. & Charokopaki, A. (2020). promoting career counselors’ sustainable career development through the group-based life construction dialogue intervention: “Constructing my future purposeful life”. Sustainability, 12, 3645. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093645

Argyropoulou, K., Mouratoglou, N., Mikedaki, K., Kaliris, A., & Papatheodorou, S. (2020). Training career counselors in contemporary narrative approaches: concerns and future directions. Proceedings of the 43rd IAEVG International Conference. Bratislava, Slovakia, 11-13 September, 2020.

Blustein, D. L. (2011). A relational theory of working. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 79, 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvb.2010.10.004

Cardoso, P., Savickas, M.L., & Gonçalves, M.M. (2019). Innovative moments in career construction counseling: Proposal for an integrative model. The Career Development Quarterly, 67, 188-204. https://doi.org/10.1002/cdq.12190

De Vos, A., Dujardin, J. M., Gielens, T., Meyers, C. (2016). Developing sustainable careers across the lifespan. European social fund network on career and AGE (Age, Generations, Experience). Cham, Switzerland: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-47741-1

De Vos, A., Van der Heijden, B. I. J. M., & Akkermans, J. (2020). Sustainable careers: Towards a conceptual model. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 117 (103196). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvb.2018.06.011

Di Fabio A. (2017). Positive Healthy Organizations: Promoting Well-Being, Meaningfulness, and Sustainability in Organizations. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 1938. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01938

Di Fabio, A. (2017). The Psychology of sustainability and sustainable development for well-being in organizations. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 1534. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01534

Di Fabio, A., & Kenny, M. E. (2016). From decent work to decent lives: Positive self and relational management (PS & RM) in the Twenty-First Century. Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 361. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00361

Di Fabio, A., & Rosen, M. A. (2018). Opening the black box of psychological processes in the science of sustainable development: A new frontier. European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2, 47. https://doi.org/10.20897/ejosdr/3933

Di Fabio, A., & Tsuda, A. (2018). The psychology of harmony and harmonization: Advancing the perspectives for the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development. Sustainability, 10, 4726. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124726

Guichard, J. (2003). Career counseling for human development: An international perspective. Career Development Quarterly, 51, 306-321. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.2161-0045.2003.tb00612.x

Lenart, J. (2016). Sustainable growth and decent work as central ideas of career counseling and life design in an international debate: For a new semio-technique of counseling. Journal of Counsellogy, 5, 271-286.

McDonald, K. S., & Hite, L. M. (2018). Conceptualizing and creating sustainable careers. Human Resources Development Review, 17, 349-372. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1534484318796318

Savickas, M. L., Laura, N., Rossier, J., Dauwalder, J. P., Duarte, M. E., Guichard, J., Van Vianen, A. (2009). Life designing: A paradigm for career construction in the 21st century. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 75, 239-250. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvb.2009.04.004

Van der Heijden, B., & De Vos, A. (2015). Sustainable careers: Introductory chapter. In A. De Vos, & B. Van der Heijden (Eds), Handbook of research on sustainable careers (pp. 1-19). Cheltehnam, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psychological interventions
  • counselling and guidance implications
  • global trends
  • social groups and societal changes
  • personal and career development
  • career education
  • career decision-making
  • social interventions
  • life-design and career- and self-management models
  • psychology of sustainable development
  • psychology of harmonization

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
The Conceptualisation of Weather as a Career Metaphor
Sustainability 2022, 14(14), 8856; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14148856 - 20 Jul 2022
Viewed by 559
Abstract
This paper aims to offer an accessible, flexible, and homogenised approach to career counselling and career development via the conceptualisation of a new metaphor in response to evolving careers and labour markets. The research question asks: How can Weather as a Career Metaphor [...] Read more.
This paper aims to offer an accessible, flexible, and homogenised approach to career counselling and career development via the conceptualisation of a new metaphor in response to evolving careers and labour markets. The research question asks: How can Weather as a Career Metaphor (WCM) offer an accessible tool for career counsellors to use with their clients across their lifespans? The theoretical framework draws together sustainable career theory and conservation of resources theory, and is complemented by the author’s decade of experience providing mentoring and career coaching to individuals across the globe. The WCM is constructed of ten elements of weather that apply to different contexts and across the lifespan. These include sun, rain, drought, thunder and lightning, ice, fog, tailwind, headwind, tornado, and rainbow. The contribution comes from the conceptualisation of a new metaphor which is theoretically grounded whilst also ensuring practical relevance via accessibility and flexibility. The WCM offers a versatile tool as part of a more comprehensive toolkit for career counsellors to help their clients to understand potential challenges within contemporary labour markets. This facilitates individuals to take ownership of their careers, acquire personal resources, and take proactive steps to prepare themselves for sustainable careers across their lifespans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Career Development)
Article
Proactive Personality and Career Adaptability of Chinese Female Pre-Service Teachers in Primary Schools: The Role of Calling
Sustainability 2022, 14(7), 4188; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14074188 - 01 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 772
Abstract
Career adaptability has attracted extensive attention from international scholars as one of the important factors predicting the future sustainability of individuals. Proactive personality and calling have a positive influence on individual career development and life satisfaction, with reference to promoting the sustainable development [...] Read more.
Career adaptability has attracted extensive attention from international scholars as one of the important factors predicting the future sustainability of individuals. Proactive personality and calling have a positive influence on individual career development and life satisfaction, with reference to promoting the sustainable development of individuals. This study focuses on the positive effects of career adaptability and calling on shaping female primary school pre-service teachers and provides suggestions for training excellent elementary school teachers and building quality primary education. This study investigated the relationship between proactive personality, calling, and career adaptability among 707 female pre-service elementary school teachers in Chinese universities. The results showed that proactive personality positively predicts calling and that proactive personality and calling positively predict career adaptability. Calling partially mediated the relationship between proactive personality and career adaptability. Therefore, it is possible to enhance calling by cultivating the proactive personality of female pre-service teachers in elementary schools, thus further promoting the career adaptability of this group. On this basis, effective strategies should be adopted in the future to improve the career adaptability of female pre-service teachers in elementary schools for the sustainable development of this group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Career Development)
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Article
Making a Commitment to Your Future: Investigating the Effect of Career Exploration and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy on the Relationship between Career Concern and Career Commitment
Sustainability 2021, 13(22), 12816; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132212816 - 19 Nov 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1027
Abstract
Career commitment refers to individuals’ dedication to their career; in the field of vocational psychology, career commitment is considered a vital factor for promoting a sustainable career. The current study examined a mediation model of career concern related to career commitment with career [...] Read more.
Career commitment refers to individuals’ dedication to their career; in the field of vocational psychology, career commitment is considered a vital factor for promoting a sustainable career. The current study examined a mediation model of career concern related to career commitment with career exploration and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy (CDMSE) as two mediators. The participants were 1105 high school students (males = 594, females = 511) recruited from three main cities in Jiangsu Province, China. Results indicated that the hypotheses were all confirmed: the direct effect of career concern on career commitment was significant (β = 0.598, p < 0.001); the indirect effect of career concern on career commitment through career exploration and CDMSE was also significant (β = 0.255, p < 0.001); and career exploration and CDMSE mediated the relation from career concern to career commitment. Finally, the authors discussed the implications of the findings which could be applied to improve a high school student’s career commitment and the sustainability of career development. The limitations of the study and the future research needed to complement the current work are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Career Development)
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Article
How Do Students Become Good Workers? Investigating the Impact of Gender and School on the Relationship between Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy and Career Exploration
Sustainability 2021, 13(14), 7876; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13147876 - 14 Jul 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1397
Abstract
In the field of vocational psychology, career decision-making self-efficacy (CDMSE) and career exploration (CE) are considered the crucial factors for developing a sustainable career. This study investigated the relationship between CDMSE and CE among Chinese high-school students, as well as the moderating effects [...] Read more.
In the field of vocational psychology, career decision-making self-efficacy (CDMSE) and career exploration (CE) are considered the crucial factors for developing a sustainable career. This study investigated the relationship between CDMSE and CE among Chinese high-school students, as well as the moderating effects of gender and school. From 2019 to 2021, 24,273 students from 13 different high schools were recruited in the study (male = 15,050, female = 9223; urban schools = 12,327, rural schools = 11,946). The results showed that (i) male students scored significantly higher than female students in both CDMSE and CE, (ii) students from urban schools scored significantly higher than students from rural schools in both CDMSE and CE, (iii) CDMSE positively predicted CE, and (iv) school moderated the relationship between CDMSE and CE, with the effect of CDMSE on CE stronger among rural school students; a moderating effect of gender was not found. These findings indicate that promoting CDMSE can lead high-school students, especially rural school students, to engage more in CE to ensure sustainable career development under the protean and boundaryless career orientation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Career Development)
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