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Modelling and Mapping of Soil

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2021) | Viewed by 6130

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Departamento de Expresión Gráfica, Escuela de Ingenierías Industriales, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain
Interests: precision agriculture; probabilistic models; sensing; GIS
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Guest Editor
Department of Agronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906, USA
Interests: precision agriculture; on-farm experiment; crop modeling; remote sensing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue welcomes contributions focusing on the use of soil information (including agricultural, forest, and urban soils) to enhance sustainable development. Manuscripts may consider either the collection of baseline soil data or more advanced modeling of soil properties. The following are examples of suitable topics: methods of collection of soil and soil-related data (e.g., soil sensing or digital soil mapping), soil data modeling, interpretation and elaboration of focused soil information, soil web GIS, application of soil information in specific sectors (e.g., agriculture, forestry, planning, natural resource management, or climate change mitigation), and soil information systems at different spatial levels.

Particular focus will be placed on research using and/or developing novel data integration techniques, studies using proximal or remotely sensed data, and research outcomes for local stakeholders, including GIS-based planning and decision support tools. 

Prof. Dr. Francisco J. Moral
Dr. Davide Cammarano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sensing for soil modeling
  • collection of soil data
  • GIS for soil modeling
  • soil and climate change
  • application of soil modeling in different sectors
  • spatial or/and temporal modeling of soil properties
  • data integration methods for soil studies
  • decision support tools for soil studies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3488 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) for Estimating Soil Organic Matter and Phosphorus in Mediterranean Montado Ecosystem
by João Serrano, Shakib Shahidian, José Marques da Silva, Luís Paixão, Mário de Carvalho, Francisco Moral, Julio Nogales-Bueno, Ricardo F.M. Teixeira, Marjan Jongen, Tiago Domingos and Ana Elisa Rato
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2734; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052734 - 3 Mar 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2471
Abstract
The Montado is an agro-silvo-pastoral ecosystem characteristic of the Mediterranean region. Pasture productivity and, consequently, the possibilities for intensifying livestock production depend on soil fertility. Soil organic matter (SOM) and phosphorus (P2O5) are two indicators of the evolution of [...] Read more.
The Montado is an agro-silvo-pastoral ecosystem characteristic of the Mediterranean region. Pasture productivity and, consequently, the possibilities for intensifying livestock production depend on soil fertility. Soil organic matter (SOM) and phosphorus (P2O5) are two indicators of the evolution of soil fertility in this ecosystem. However, their conventional analytical determination by reference laboratory methods is costly, time consuming, and laborious and, thus, does not meet the needs of current production systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate an alternative approach to estimate SOM and soil P2O5 based on near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with multivariate data analysis. For this purpose, 242 topsoil samples were collected in 2019 in eleven fields. These samples were subjected to reference laboratory analysis and NIRS analysis. For NIRS, 165 samples were used during the calibration phase and 77 samples were used during the external validation phase. The results of this study showed significant correlation between NIRS calibration models and reference methods for quantification of these soil parameters. The coefficient of determination (R2, 0.85 for SOM and 0.76 for P2O5) and the residual predictive deviation (RPD, 2.7 for SOM and 2.2 for P2O5) obtained in external validation indicated the potential of NIRS to estimate SOM and P2O5, which can facilitate farm managers’ decision making in terms of dynamic management of animal grazing and differential fertilizer application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modelling and Mapping of Soil)
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14 pages, 2147 KiB  
Article
Hidden Engineers and Service Providers: Earthworms in Agricultural Land-Use Types of South Tyrol, Italy
by Johannes Rüdisser, Erich Tasser, Thomas Peham, Erwin Meyer and Ulrike Tappeiner
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 312; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010312 - 31 Dec 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3047
Abstract
Earthworm activities affect the provision of many ecosystem services. Land use can strongly influence earthworm communities and, hence related soil functions. We assessed earthworm biomass, abundance, and species composition on grasslands, apple orchards, and vineyards in the context of an existing sustainability assessment [...] Read more.
Earthworm activities affect the provision of many ecosystem services. Land use can strongly influence earthworm communities and, hence related soil functions. We assessed earthworm biomass, abundance, and species composition on grasslands, apple orchards, and vineyards in the context of an existing sustainability assessment tool in South Tyrol, Italy. A stratified sampling campaign revealed significant differences in earthworm distribution. We found 21 to 700 individuals m−2 in grasslands and surprisingly abundant earthworm communities in apple orchards (14 to 382 individuals m−2). Results for vineyards were ambiguous with no or very low abundance in 47% of the vineyards and a maximum of 396 individuals m−2. Mesohumic endogeic species were the most abundant functional group observed (75% of the biomass in grasslands, 50% in apple orchards and vineyards). Aporrectodea caliginosa was the most abundant endogeic species, Lumbricus rubellus the dominant polyhumic endogeic species in all land-use types. We estimated a total of 34,900 t of earthworm biomass on agricultural areas in South Tyrol corresponding to a total value of EUR 872 million. Although soil quality is a complex concept that cannot be captured with a single indicator, earthworms are suitable and feasible indicators for sustainable soil use at the landscape scale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modelling and Mapping of Soil)
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