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Housing Inequality: Causes and Potential Solutions

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2022) | Viewed by 6894

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Management in the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, 2628 BL Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: housing systems; housing policy; comparative research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Management in the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, 2628 BL Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: housing sytems; urban development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In a context of growing housing shortages and affordability problems, housing systems across the world are characterized by increasing inequality. There are cleavages between deprived and gentrified areas, between home owners and tenants, and between younger and older generations. Whilst the roots of these different manifestations of housing inequality are strongly connected to international processes (globalization, urbanization, neo-liberalization, financialization), potential solutions tend to be formulated at the national level and, increasingly, at the local level. This Special Issue intends to provide a comparative state-of-the-art overview of research on housing inequality. For this purpose, we welcome papers that deal with (elements of) the following two research questions.

  1. How does the interplay beween international, national, and local actors and processes result in housing inequality, empirically but also theoretically?
  2. Which new housing solutions (government policies, social innovations, civil society initiatives) can (potentially) combat the different forms of housing inequality, thereby resulting in housing systems that are more affordable, socially sustainable, and inclusive? What is the rationale underlying these solutions? How have they been developed? To what extent are these solutions transferable to other contexts?

We are happy to receive papers from different geographical contexts (Global North, Global South) and different geographical scales (from national level to city level). International comparative papers are particularly welcome. It is important that all submitted papers have a clear theoretical framework that connects to the research questions outlined above.

Dr. Joris Hoekstra
Dr. Martina Gentili
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • housing inequality
  • housing solutions
  • transferability
  • national and local housing systems
  • multi-level housing governance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 3336 KiB  
Article
‘Generation Rent’ in a Super Homeownership Environment: The Case of Budapest, Hungary
by Adrienne Csizmady and Lea Kőszeghy
Sustainability 2022, 14(14), 8929; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14148929 - 21 Jul 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2515
Abstract
The paper examines the applicability of the concept of ‘generation rent’ in the ‘super-homeownership’ housing regime and better-off focused welfare regime of Hungary. Available official statistical and survey data show the increase in private rentals among young households, and the appearance of private [...] Read more.
The paper examines the applicability of the concept of ‘generation rent’ in the ‘super-homeownership’ housing regime and better-off focused welfare regime of Hungary. Available official statistical and survey data show the increase in private rentals among young households, and the appearance of private rental housing as a potential longer-term solution in the attitudes of young people towards housing. In the Hungarian context, the strong role of intergenerational transfers in access to home ownership and public housing policies contribute to the development of a ‘generation rent’. Furthermore, housing policies also affect the housing experiences of the Hungarian ‘generation rent’. In order to reduce tenure security and affordability risks, many households turn to family and friend networks. The involvement of family relations tends to prolong dependency on the family, thus affecting the youth-adulthood transition. Meanwhile the housing career plans of young people reflect the strongly ownership-oriented public discourse, even in the case of low-status young people, for whom acquiring homeownership is not a realistic aspiration. The analysis argues that the concept can be applied in the Hungarian context; however, the development, housing experiences, and housing career plans of ‘generation rent’ in Hungary are strongly influenced by the specific welfare regime and housing system context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Housing Inequality: Causes and Potential Solutions)
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31 pages, 6100 KiB  
Article
Rehabilitation of Mass Housing as a Contribution to Social Equality: Insights from the East-West European Academic Dialogue
by Aleksandra Milovanović, Anica Dragutinovic, Ana Nikezić, Uta Pottgiesser, Mihajlo Stojanovski, Ana Ivanovska Deskova, Jovan Ivanovski and Tea Damjanovska
Sustainability 2022, 14(13), 8106; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14138106 - 2 Jul 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2933
Abstract
Mass housing neighbourhoods (MHN) represent the leading pattern of urban transformation and expansion in the second half of the 20th century, and accordingly evaluation, regeneration and redesign of the MHN represent a necessary and challenging task in the contemporary research context. In the [...] Read more.
Mass housing neighbourhoods (MHN) represent the leading pattern of urban transformation and expansion in the second half of the 20th century, and accordingly evaluation, regeneration and redesign of the MHN represent a necessary and challenging task in the contemporary research context. In the practical scope of MHN rehabilitation, various holistic approaches and design strategies are identified that affirm both ecological transition and social transformation of these urban settings. However, the level of application of such approaches across Europe varies greatly, and requires research initiatives of a comparative nature that open a cross-geographical debate at the European level. Although there is a series of evidence-based studies that define the conceptual framework of MHN, i.e., large-scale housing settlements, through historical-interpretative and chronological analyses, the academic debate on practical and feasible MHN rehabilitation and their sustainable integration into the urban development of cities at European level is underdeveloped. The specific objective of this paper is to establish preliminary insights into the current level of MHN rehabilitation and to identify challenges for further actions through (1) a comparative analysis of MHN role models from the second half of 20th century, and through (2) insights from an implemented expert questionnaire. The research engages a comparative case study analysis as the primary method and analyses MHN in Germany (as a representative of Western Europe) and in the two ex-Yugoslav countries, North Macedonia and Serbia (as representatives of Eastern Europe). This research has highlighted the main obstacles and challenges for MHN rehabilitation and demonstrated the importance of a multiscale approach to MHN analysis, having in mind that through the distribution of design values at the analysed spatial levels (neighbourhood level, building level, and apartment level) the application of affirmative indicators within different design values group is recognised. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Housing Inequality: Causes and Potential Solutions)
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