Special Issue "Sustainable Community-Based Tourism: A Resilience Perspective"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainability of Culture and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Esteban Ruiz-Ballesteros
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social Anthropology, Psychology and Public Health, University of Pablo de Olavide, Ctra. de Utrera, 1, 41013 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: community-based tourism; environmental anthropology; resilience thinking; community studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Community-based tourism (CBT) is growing all around the world thanks to local communities’ initiatives and the support of international bodies, governments, international cooperation agencies, NGOs and indigenous organizations. The literature on CBT offers us a clear vision of what is expected of a community-based tourism initiative from a sustainable perspective: (1) local leadership, substantiated by the community ownership, planning, managing and control over tourist activity and its profit (empowerment); (2) commitment to the conservation of natural and cultural resources in the territory; and (3) prioritization of the social and economic development of the community. Thus Community-based tourism and social-ecological sustainability seem to be soundly linked. But to understand CBT effects on sustainability we need an analytical approach that allows us to capture its multidimensionality and complexity. We consider resilience thinking as an appropriate theoretical and methodological framework to analyze the CBT phenomenon from diverse yet integrated perspectives.

The goal of this Special Issue is to pool contributions that use different perspectives on resilience (socio-ecological resilience, community resilience, tourist resilience, etc.) to shed light on the study of CBT sustainability. The Special Issue target is to gain a more complex understanding of the cultural, social, economic and environmental transformation processes associated with CBT experiences through the lens of resilience.

Therefore we are considering contributions that develop different approaches or perspectives to CBT within a resilience framework, presenting either case studies or synthesis papers that permit comparisons and further reflections on the sustainability of CBT.

Prof. Dr. Esteban Ruiz-Ballesteros
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Community-based tourism
  • Social sustainability
  • Environmental sustainability
  • Resilience
  • Social-ecological resilience
  • Community resilience

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
“May the Smoke Keep Coming Out the Fireplace”: Moral Connections between Rural Tourism and Socio-Ecological Resilience in the EUME Region, Galicia
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4602; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114602 (registering DOI) - 04 Jun 2020
Abstract
For several decades, tourism has been considered an important instrument for the sustainable development of rural areas. However, a great deal of scholarship has cast a doubt on the actual economic and ecological impacts of many of these initiatives. Acknowledging these critiques, we [...] Read more.
For several decades, tourism has been considered an important instrument for the sustainable development of rural areas. However, a great deal of scholarship has cast a doubt on the actual economic and ecological impacts of many of these initiatives. Acknowledging these critiques, we argue in this paper that a more accurate examination of the implication of rural development projects based on tourism should not merely look at the number of overnight stays or the income generated, but also at the multiple, subtle and complex implications of tourism for socio-ecological resilience. In order to do this, we argue, it is crucial to pay attention to the moral values underpinning tourism practices. Through an ethnographic analysis of the material, symbolic and experiential transformations brought about by a number of tourism initiatives in a rural region in Galicia, our goal is to discuss the complex connections between the promotion of this new activity, the diversification of the local economy, and the social reproduction of local communities and their specific forms of human-environment engagements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Community-Based Tourism: A Resilience Perspective)
Open AccessArticle
Rebuilding Relocated Tribal Communities Better via Culture: Livelihood and Social Resilience for Disaster Risk Reduction
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4538; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114538 - 03 Jun 2020
Abstract
Building back better is the goal of post-disaster recovery. However, most of the extant literature focuses on hardware reconstruction and there is a lack of attention on the social aspect of recovery. This study aims to understand the role of culture in the [...] Read more.
Building back better is the goal of post-disaster recovery. However, most of the extant literature focuses on hardware reconstruction and there is a lack of attention on the social aspect of recovery. This study aims to understand the role of culture in the recovery process of relocating indigenous communities through tourism livelihood. A Tsou indigenous settlement, relocated after the 2009 Typhoon Morakot in Taiwan, was used as a case study. Field data were collected through participant observations in tourism and community activities as well as semi-structured interviews over a period of 15 months. The study found that appealing to a relocated tribe’s culture, not their land, as their community’s foundation could reduce conflicts within the community and increase social resilience. Indigenous culture-based tourism could serve as an important source of livelihood for such tribes, supporting long-term development. This study highlights community-based cultural tourism as a post-disaster livelihood revival approach which is beneficial for a resilient recovery. Culture could reduce disaster risk through a transformation to a livelihood source and further become the base of community resilience. Instead of promoting detached culture preservation, this study argues that a livelihood-relevant culturally innovative transformation could create a win–win situation for both post-disaster community recovery and culture inheritance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Community-Based Tourism: A Resilience Perspective)
Open AccessArticle
Experiences of Resilience and Mapuche Community Based Tourism in the Pre-Cordilleran Territories of Panguipulli, Southern Chile
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 817; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030817 - 22 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
In Latin America, community resilience has emphasized the solidarity capacities and strengths of indigenous communities to face and proactively overcome adversities derived from political and social violence. This is the case of Mapuche communities linked to community based tourism in pre-cordilleran areas of [...] Read more.
In Latin America, community resilience has emphasized the solidarity capacities and strengths of indigenous communities to face and proactively overcome adversities derived from political and social violence. This is the case of Mapuche communities linked to community based tourism in pre-cordilleran areas of southern Chile. This article analyzes tourism experiences of these Mapuche communities, based on a qualitative exploratory and descriptive approach, in order to determine their relationship with community resilience processes. The conclusion is that community based tourism has contributed to absorbing external disturbances associated with the processes of territorial dispossession, colonization, and extractive and neoliberal policies that these communities face, resist, and overlap without losing their identity. This tourism also reinforces processes of cultural revitalization of communities, connected social capacities, and development of organizational strategies to achieve the collective desire for a favorable future associated with their life plans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Community-Based Tourism: A Resilience Perspective)
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Open AccessReview
Minority Community Resilience and Cultural Heritage Preservation: A Case Study of the Gullah Geechee Community
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2266; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062266 - 13 Mar 2020
Abstract
The Gullah Geechee community of the south-eastern United States endures today as a minority group with a significant cultural heritage. However, little research has been conducted to explore this community’s resilience in the face of climate change and other environmental impacts. The database [...] Read more.
The Gullah Geechee community of the south-eastern United States endures today as a minority group with a significant cultural heritage. However, little research has been conducted to explore this community’s resilience in the face of climate change and other environmental impacts. The database Web of Science was searched and 109 publications on the Gullah Geechee community were identified. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, we analyzed the publications to identify patterns and primary research themes related to the Gullah Geechee community’s resilience. Findings revealed that Gullah Geechee‘s cultural heritage is vulnerable to climatic and societal changes, but can also be a source for enhancing community resilience and promoting more sustainable community-led heritage and tourism developments. A framework is proposed for building community resilience in the context of minority and/or marginalized communities (e.g., Gullah Geechee). This study highlights the urgent need to not only better understand and incorporate a community’s economic dimensions and losses in various decision- and policy-making processes but also their cultural and social dimensions and losses. This systematic analysis can help inform both heritage preservation and community-led tourism practices and policies related to the Gullah Geechee community, as well as help direct new research efforts focusing on minority and/or marginalized community resilience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Community-Based Tourism: A Resilience Perspective)
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