Special Issue "Tolerance Management in Architecture, Engineering and Construction"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Michail Kagioglou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW 2751, Australia
Interests: tolerance management; lean construction; platform design; benefit realization; requirement management; value generation; construction engineering and management; healthcare infrastructure; product development; mass customization; automated regulated checking; process management
Dr. Saeed Talebi
E-Mail
Guest Editor
School of Engineering & The Built Environment, Birmingham City University, B4 7XG Birmingham, UK
Interests: tolerance management; construction engineering and management; platform design; condition monitoring of infrastructure; lean facilities management; BIM

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry has been criticized for a lack of well-developed and widely accepted methods to provide designers and practitioners proactive insight into avoiding defects associated with dimensional and geometric variations. The existing software (e.g., BIM) is not yet developed enough to support approaches proposed in the existing AEC literature, and a reluctance prevails in the industry to use potential solutions that are not automated and/ or are not supported by organizations developing standards. As a result, intratrade and intertrade tolerance related defects are amongst the most recurring defects in every building and civil engineering project. Those defects are too often dealt with at the time and place of the construction work and they considerably increase the cost of construction and maintenance, cause delays, increase material wastage, and adversely influence customer satisfaction.

Over the years, researchers have been tackling various research areas related to tolerances, and organizations developing standards (e.g., BSI, ISO, ACI) aim to routinely revise their guidelines to better address tolerances in design and construction. This Special Issue provides a platform for researchers to consolidate their efforts and augment knowledge in this important area, in order to take stock of the latest developments in this area, identify trends and developments not only in the AEC industry but also in other industries, and propose tangible solutions to unravel management of dimensional and geometric variations across the AEC industry. The provision of such an interdisciplinary platform is deemed to be essential because developing a workable solution for managing tolerances would require an amalgamation and composition of different fields of knowledge, including project management, engineering, design, technology, and materials science.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Exemplary practices in tolerance management;
  • Methods to achieve tolerance compatibility (e.g., process capability, product design, assembly planning, accurate setting-out, DfMA);
  • Challenges and updates in standards and regulatory frameworks addressing tolerances;
  • Coordination of tolerances across the supply chain;
  • Automation of various areas within tolerance management using remote sensing technologies, AR/VR, BIM, digital twin, artificial intelligence, robots, computer-aided tolerancing software, etc;
  • Risk management strategies and tolerances;
  • Simulation tools and mathematical models for tolerance analysis;
  • Integration and communication of specified and achieved tolerances in architectural and engineering drawings and models;
  • Impact of tolerances on KPIs and functional requirements (e.g., quality, safety, structural integrity, energy efficiency, water tightness);
  • Adoption of novel methods from other industries (e.g., GD&T, VD&T, Taguchi methods);
  • Tolerances in prefabrication and modularization construction, passive house concept, and 3D printing for construction;
  • Tolerances in the fields of platform design and mass customization;
  • Automated code checking for tolerances;
  • Adoption of lean construction principles and methods (e.g., continuous improvement, standardization, last planner system, target value design) for tolerance management;
  • Development of theory for tolerance management;
  • Tolerances in project auditing, review, close-out, and condition monitoring.

Prof. Dr. Michail Kagioglou
Dr. Saeed Talebi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Tolerance management
  • simulation
  • automation
  • technologies, modeling
  • standards, methods
  • theory
  • costing
  • whole lifecycle cost
  • quality management
  • digitalization

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Developing a Parametric Cash Flow Forecasting Model for Complex Infrastructure Projects: A Comparative Study
Sustainability 2021, 13(20), 11305; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011305 - 13 Oct 2021
Viewed by 310
Abstract
Forecasting the cash flow for infrastructure projects has not received much attention in the existing models. Moreover, disregarding the cost flow behaviour and proposing models that entail a relatively high dimensionality of inputs have been the main drawbacks of the existing models. This [...] Read more.
Forecasting the cash flow for infrastructure projects has not received much attention in the existing models. Moreover, disregarding the cost flow behaviour and proposing models that entail a relatively high dimensionality of inputs have been the main drawbacks of the existing models. This study proposes a heuristic cash flow forecasting (CFF) model for infrastructure projects, and it explores the underlying behaviour of the cost flow. The proposed model was validated by adopting a case study approach,the actual cost flow datasets were mined from a verified data system. The results invalidated the employment of a dominant heuristic rule with regard to a cost-flow-time relationship in infrastructure projects. On the other hand, a mathematical parameter-based comparison between the trends analysed from previous studies revealed that the cost flows of infrastructure projects procured through a design-bid-build (D-B-B) route behaved in a similar manner to building projects procured through a construction management route. This research contributes to the body of knowledge providing a method to enable infrastructure contractors to accurately forecast the required working capital through adding a new dimension for project classification by coining the term “the quaternary flow percentage”. In addition, this study indicates the importance of identifying the impact of root risks on the individual cost flow components rather than on the aggregated cost flow, which is a recommendation for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tolerance Management in Architecture, Engineering and Construction)
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Article
BIM and DfMA: A Paradigm of New Opportunities
Sustainability 2021, 13(17), 9591; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13179591 - 26 Aug 2021
Viewed by 782
Abstract
The main goal of this study is to explore the adoption of a design for manufacturing and assembly (DfMA) and building information management (BIM) approach during the whole lifecycle of assets. This approach aims to tackle issues inherent in the design of traditional [...] Read more.
The main goal of this study is to explore the adoption of a design for manufacturing and assembly (DfMA) and building information management (BIM) approach during the whole lifecycle of assets. This approach aims to tackle issues inherent in the design of traditional construction methods, such as low productivity and quality, poor predictability and building performance, and energy use, through the implementation of a BIM library of off-site components. In recent years, a renewed interest has been directed to the attempt to provide solutions to these urgent problems through the adoption of new advancements in technologies. However, while there are studies focussing on a BIM-DfMA approach, there is a lack of research regarding how this approach should be adopted during the whole lifecycle of the assets. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, defining an efficient way of developing a component-based BIM object library has not yet been included in any of the available studies. A mixed methodology approach has been used in this research. A conceptual framework was developed as the result of an extensive literature review to investigate new advancements in the AEC sector. Following the literature review, the framework was tested and validated through a case study based on the production and adoption of a BIM library of off-site components at the design stage of an asset. The architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry has recognised the necessity of a new approach that helps to resolve the well-known issues presented in traditional methods of construction. The conceptual framework and case study proposed presents a valuable new method of construction that support the implementation of a BIM and DfMA approach, highlighting their benefits. This framework has been created using many valuable and reliable sources of information. The result of this research supports the idea of a novel new construction method that focuses on a manufacturing-digital-driven industry, with the use of DfMA in a BIM-integrated approach. This novel method will add significance and be beneficial for a wide range of aspects in the construction sector, contributing to the theoretical and practical domain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tolerance Management in Architecture, Engineering and Construction)
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Article
Value Management Integration for Whole Life Cycle: Post COVID-19 Strategy for the UK Construction Industry
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 9274; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13169274 - 18 Aug 2021
Viewed by 930
Abstract
Value management (VM) and its integration in the whole life cycle (WLC) have become huge concepts for construction projects to provide additional value of an asset for the end user or client. However, the role of VM and its integration as part of [...] Read more.
Value management (VM) and its integration in the whole life cycle (WLC) have become huge concepts for construction projects to provide additional value of an asset for the end user or client. However, the role of VM and its integration as part of the WLC in a construction project remain reactive, and highly impacted by nature of the project, and this has become more challenging with the epidemic impact of COVID-19. This research aims to investigate the mechanisms that delivers value management as part of the “re-invent” strategy proposed by the Construction Leadership Council in the UK government to improve WLC for buildings. In addition to existing secondary data from the literature, primary data were attained using a focus group with six quantity surveyors from different cost consultancies in the UK to gather qualitative evidence using their experiences, perceptions, and key challenges they face when integrating VM. Findings revealed that value management is primarily being used as a cost-cutting tool, the majority of quantity surveyors lack knowledge of what it encompasses, hence the industry needs a more proactive strategy towards it. Analysis revealed that value management is primarily implemented as a cost-cutting solution, key stakeholders (e.g., facility managers) need to be integrated, and there is no standardised process to incorporate value management in projects. The study proposes a four-dimensional (governance and policies, sustainability, industry’s best practice, and innovation and technology) strategy to facilitate more holistic considerations of value management post COVID-19. Future work looks into evaluating the strategy proposed while acknowledging different procurement routes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tolerance Management in Architecture, Engineering and Construction)
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Article
Factors Driving Success of Cost Management Practices in Integrated Project Delivery (IPD)
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9539; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229539 - 16 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1041
Abstract
Integrated project delivery (IPD) is a mode of project procurement recognised as facilitating superior project performance. However, this success is contingent on effective cost management practices that share cost data with all project stakeholders in an accurate, timely and transparent manner. Despite an [...] Read more.
Integrated project delivery (IPD) is a mode of project procurement recognised as facilitating superior project performance. However, this success is contingent on effective cost management practices that share cost data with all project stakeholders in an accurate, timely and transparent manner. Despite an extensive literature on aspects of cost management, none identifies the essential ingredients required of an effective cost management system, sufficiently robust to support successful IPD projects. Candidate cost management augmenting practices are drawn from the literature, and presented for scrutiny in questionnaire form, to fifty IPD experienced experts, based in the USA, UK and Australia. Findings reveal activity-based costing (ABC) to be effective at identifying overhead costs and creating accounting transparency. Similarly, earned value management (EVM), in combination with ABC, is effective at developing mathematical models for equitable risk-reward distribution. Moreover, web-based management systems, as supported by Building Information Modelling (BIM), are effective at generating trust and collaboration on which IPD success depends. A questionnaire survey using purposive sampling was conducted to assess the factors driving success of implementing IPD regarding cost management process. The contribution to knowledge made by this paper is in identifying requisite support mechanisms essential to elevate traditional cost management practices to the higher standard needed to ensure IPD delivery success. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tolerance Management in Architecture, Engineering and Construction)
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Review

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Review
Lessons Learned, Barriers, and Improvement Factors for Mega Building Construction Projects in Developing Countries: Review Study
Sustainability 2021, 13(19), 10678; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910678 - 26 Sep 2021
Viewed by 371
Abstract
A mega-project is a major project or a group of projects of significant cost that attract a high level of public attention or political interest because of substantial direct and indirect impacts on the community, environment, and state budget. Capturing and sharing the [...] Read more.
A mega-project is a major project or a group of projects of significant cost that attract a high level of public attention or political interest because of substantial direct and indirect impacts on the community, environment, and state budget. Capturing and sharing the knowledge from the performance of the current mega projects is essential in order to avoid losing vital corporate knowledge assets in the construction industry. The learned lessons are gained from experience, success, and failure for improving future performance. This research aims to review and read out the lessons learned from 77 research papers that have dealt with the barriers that hinder the successful performance of mega building construction projects in developing countries, identify and classify the main obstacles, and propose improvements for successful implementation and management of mega building construction projects. The results of this paper will help project owners, construction companies, and other stakeholders in developing countries to overcome the limitations in the execution of mega building construction projects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tolerance Management in Architecture, Engineering and Construction)
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