Special Issue "Technology-Enhanced Learning, Open Science and Global Education"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Education and Approaches".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Daniel Burgos
Website
Guest Editor
Research Institute for Innovation & Technology in Education (UNIR iTED), Universidad Internacional de La Rioja (UNIR), Av. de la Paz, 137, 26006 Logroño, La Rioja, Spain
Interests: adaptive and informal eLearning; educational technology; learning analytics; open education; open science; educational games; serious games; gamification; elearning specifications
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Khalid Berrada
Website
Guest Editor
Transdisciplinary Research Group on Educational Innovation (Trans ERIE) – Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Interests: physics education; active learning; eLearning; moocs and distance education; innovation and digital; open education and open educational resources

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Educational technology, online learning and Open Science are key pillars in modern academic and professional settings. From informal learning and nonformal learning, thanks to thousands of educational sources on the internet, such as videos, wikis, MOOCs, and other open educational resources, to a variety of tools, software applications, and technological improvements, such as blockchain, cloud computing, immersive scenarios, serious games, etc., education is now far more enhanced than ever before. The student and the teacher are more connected to each other, they have more resources and services to work with, and they can have a wider impact with a more reasonable workload thanks to never-ending networks.

In this context, global education becomes a fourth pillar. The variety of languages, cultures, and ways of expression; resources, technology access, and licensing formats; methodologies, strategies, academic programs, and actions plans: All of these widen the learning and teaching possibilities, across the world, in endless ways.

This Special Issue encourages addressing intercultural ways in which technology enhances learning, teaching, and Open Science. In doing so, learners, teachers and academic managers are better supported to achieve new competences, increase their performance, and reach new milestones, which would otherwise be difficult or impossible to achieve, without that very technology.

Prof. Dr. Daniel Burgos
Prof. Dr. Khalid Berrada
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Technology-enhanced learning
  • eLearning
  • Open Science
  • Open educational practices
  • Open educational resources
  • Learning analytics
  • Global learning
  • Intercultural educational programs
  • Educational online methodologies
  • Personalized learning for online students
  • Adaptive teaching strategies for online settings
  • Smart strategies for online academic management
  • Formal, nonformal, and informal learning, integrated
  • Social networks as a support to online users in academic contexts

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Is Teamwork Different Online Versus Face-to-Face? A Case in Engineering Education
Sustainability 2020, 12(24), 10444; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410444 - 14 Dec 2020
Abstract
Teamwork has been systematically studied in engineering education as an educational method and a learning outcome. Based on the recent advances in socially-shared regulation as a framework for teamwork processes, this study explores the impact of the transition to online learning. The purpose [...] Read more.
Teamwork has been systematically studied in engineering education as an educational method and a learning outcome. Based on the recent advances in socially-shared regulation as a framework for teamwork processes, this study explores the impact of the transition to online learning. The purpose of this study is to understand if face-to-face and online team dynamics differ concerning the prevalence of personal goals, team challenges, and individual/social strategies. The Adaptive Instrument for Regulation of Emotions (AIRE) Questionnaire was used to compare two semesters in project-based learning engineering courses that were face-to-face (2019) and then converted to an online modality (2020) due to the COVID-19 crisis. Our results show that both modalities report mostly the same prevalence of goals, challenges, and strategies. However, online students tend to manifest a significantly lower prevalence of specific challenges and strategies, suggesting that online teamwork may have involved less group deliberation. These results provide evidence for the "equivalency theory" between online and face-to-face learning in a context where all systemic levels transitioned to a digital modality. These findings raise the question of whether online teaching encourages the emergence of team conflict and deliberation needed for creative thinking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Enhanced Learning, Open Science and Global Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Visual Literacy Intervention for Improving Undergraduate Student Critical Thinking of Global Sustainability Issues
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 10209; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122310209 - 07 Dec 2020
Abstract
The promotion of global sustainability within environmental science courses requires a paradigm switch from knowledge-based teaching to teaching that stimulates higher-order cognitive skills. Non-major undergraduate science courses, such as environmental science, promote critical thinking in students in order to improve the uptake of [...] Read more.
The promotion of global sustainability within environmental science courses requires a paradigm switch from knowledge-based teaching to teaching that stimulates higher-order cognitive skills. Non-major undergraduate science courses, such as environmental science, promote critical thinking in students in order to improve the uptake of scientific information and develop the rational decision making used to make more informed decisions. Science, engineering, technology and mathematics (STEM) courses rely extensively on visuals in lectures, readings and homework to improve knowledge. However, undergraduate students do not automatically acquire visual literacy and a lack of intervention from instructors could be limiting academic success. In this study, a visual literacy intervention was developed and tested in the face-to-face (FTF) and online sections of an undergraduate non-major Introduction to Environmental Science course. The intervention was designed to test and improve visual literacy at three levels: (1) elementary—identifying values; (2) intermediate—identifying trends; and (3) advanced—using the data to make projections or conclusions. Students demonstrated a significant difference in their ability to answer elementary and advanced visual literacy questions in both course sections in the pre-test and post-test. Students in the face-to-face course had significantly higher exam scores and higher median assessment scores compared to sections without a visual literacy intervention. The online section did not show significant improvements in visual literacy or academic success due to a lack of reinforcement of visual literacy following the initial intervention. The visual literacy intervention shows promising results in improving student academic success and should be considered for implementation in other general education STEM courses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Enhanced Learning, Open Science and Global Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Interdisciplinary Experience Using Technological Tools in Sport Science
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 9840; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12239840 - 25 Nov 2020
Abstract
In the framework that interdisciplinary projects could be a potential tool to improve learning processes in higher education, a teaching innovation experience was carried out. This study presents the didactic experience carried out between two first-year subjects of the Degree in Physical Activity [...] Read more.
In the framework that interdisciplinary projects could be a potential tool to improve learning processes in higher education, a teaching innovation experience was carried out. This study presents the didactic experience carried out between two first-year subjects of the Degree in Physical Activity and Sport Sciences. The experience consisted of designing and implementing a practice activity from an interdisciplinary approach and with the support of technological tools, such as the use of platforms, recordings and sports technique analysis software. The main aim of the present study was to assess such an experience according to students’ perception. The instrument used to assess such an interdisciplinary experience was a questionnaire of 17 items. The sample comprised 79 students who attended both subjects simultaneously. The reliability of the instrument is ensured according to Cronbach’s alpha (a = 0.903). The results of this study, as interdisciplinarity and organizational aspects, were highly assessed. The analysis of the survey also indicates that this interdisciplinary practice activity helped subjects to achieve a more meaningful level of both integrated and specific knowledge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Enhanced Learning, Open Science and Global Education)
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Open AccessArticle
A Sociological View on Designing a Sustainable Online Community for K–12 Teachers: A Systematic Review
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9742; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229742 - 22 Nov 2020
Abstract
As a way to support teachers’ professional development activities and build communities of practice for teachers, education researchers and practitioners have put considerable effort into building an online learning community for K–12 teachers to create a venue to facilitate teachers’ joint knowledge construction. [...] Read more.
As a way to support teachers’ professional development activities and build communities of practice for teachers, education researchers and practitioners have put considerable effort into building an online learning community for K–12 teachers to create a venue to facilitate teachers’ joint knowledge construction. However, a substantial number of such online communities have failed due to lack of participation of members. Therefore, it is critical to understand how to design a sustainable community that fulfills members’ needs and elicits active participation of members. In this literature review, we adopted a sociological framework to investigate how to create a sustainable online community. This framework suggests that the sustainability of a community comes from individual members’ three types of commitments: instrumental, affective, and moral commitments. Such commitments are results of members’ cognitive, cathectic, and evaluative processes and lead to membership retainment, cohesive relationships, and socially regulated participation. Using this framework, we conducted a systematic literature review on online teacher community articles published from 1990 to 2018. Our findings provide insights on factors associated with teacher members’ instrumental, affective, and moral commitment to an online community. Based on these findings, we further provide design suggestions to build a sustainable community for teachers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Enhanced Learning, Open Science and Global Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Design and Evaluation of a Collaborative Educational Game: BECO Games
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8471; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208471 - 14 Oct 2020
Abstract
This paper describes the design and validation of a game based on a platform for easy deployment of collaborative educational games, named BECO Games platform. As an example of its potential, a learning experience for an Economics subject was created through a collaborative [...] Read more.
This paper describes the design and validation of a game based on a platform for easy deployment of collaborative educational games, named BECO Games platform. As an example of its potential, a learning experience for an Economics subject was created through a collaborative game to understand the concept of common goods. The effectiveness of the game was tested by comparing the performance of Bachelor students who used the platform and those who did not (137 students vs. 92 students). In addition, it was controlled that in previous years when students played the game through forums and an Excel sheet, these differences did not exist. Results indicate that the performance differences between students who participated in the online game and those who did not were greater than in previous years. In addition, a satisfaction survey was delivered to the students to understand their impressions better. This survey assessed student opinion about the platform, about the educational experience, and about their behavior during the game. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Enhanced Learning, Open Science and Global Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Application of Quantitative Computer-Based Analysis for Student’s Learning Tendency on the Efficient Utilization of Mobile Phones during Lecture Hours
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8345; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208345 - 10 Oct 2020
Abstract
The rapid pace of development and technology enhancements revolutionize the way people communicate and subsequently exert a considerable influence on a student’s involvement and motivation. Mobile phones are considered among the most important devices to have made a breakthrough in every aspect of [...] Read more.
The rapid pace of development and technology enhancements revolutionize the way people communicate and subsequently exert a considerable influence on a student’s involvement and motivation. Mobile phones are considered among the most important devices to have made a breakthrough in every aspect of human life. Students’ persistence in using mobile phones during classroom hours has become a significant concern because of distractions, disruptions, cheating, and inappropriate use. The objective of this paper is to identify the reasons why students use mobile phones during lecture hours by quantitative computer-based analysis. The participants were 520 undergraduate students who completed a questionnaire that is significantly based on the comparison of three principal perceptions of age, gender, and grades. To investigate the reliability of the proposed factors, Cronbach’s alpha parameter was adequately utilized in this study to check the consistency adaptation of these factors and to provide questions on the questionnaire. To validate the measurement scales, qualitative content validity was taken into consideration. The analysis of the correlation matrix that is based on the six administered variables in this study has been conducted in the statistic correlation level of 0.01, which is ranged from 0.043 to 0.601. Although no statistically significant differences were found in the students’ perception regarding their gender and age, the differences were significant regarding their grades as far as the addiction reason was concerned. Consequently, the overwhelming majority of the students tended to use mobile phones during the lecture hours for class-related purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Enhanced Learning, Open Science and Global Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Geography Pre-Service Teachers’ Perspectives on Multimedia Technology and Environmental Education
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 6903; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12176903 - 25 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Multimedia technology (MT) is now widely used in primary and secondary classrooms and has excellent potential for environmental education. The discipline of Geography has strong synergies with environmental education. The paper uses the Q methodology to investigate the responses of pre-service geography teachers [...] Read more.
Multimedia technology (MT) is now widely used in primary and secondary classrooms and has excellent potential for environmental education. The discipline of Geography has strong synergies with environmental education. The paper uses the Q methodology to investigate the responses of pre-service geography teachers regarding the use of multimedia in environmental education (EE). The viewpoints of respondents were clustered into three broad perspectives relating to the use of multimedia: Perspective 1: the use of multimedia is regarded as valuable but difficult to apply; perspective 2: the use of multimedia is rewarding and practicable; perspective 3: the use of all types of multimedia is seen as highly valuable, although in the case of GIS the attitude is more equivocal. All three perspectives align with the idea that MT can improve EE, although the respondents suggest it cannot be a direct replacement for fieldwork. While all three perspectives are consistent with the view that multimedia teaching has many functional advantages in relation to environmental education, concerns are expressed regarding teachers’ capacity to fulfill its potential. The authors suggest that understanding these perspectives can help improve pre-service teacher education and advance environment education in middle school. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Enhanced Learning, Open Science and Global Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Secondary Students’ Identities in the Virtual Classroom
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4407; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114407 - 28 May 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Though researchers have paid attention to the social aspect of students’ virtual and online learning, little attention has been paid to their identity. The present research intends to do so by studying students’ identities when learning high-level mathematics in the virtual classroom. Fourteen [...] Read more.
Though researchers have paid attention to the social aspect of students’ virtual and online learning, little attention has been paid to their identity. The present research intends to do so by studying students’ identities when learning high-level mathematics in the virtual classroom. Fourteen secondary school students participated in the research. Data were collected using interviews with the participants before and after participating in the virtual mathematics classroom. Data analysis was done using inductive and deductive content analysis, where the deductive analysis utilized the narrative framework developed by Sfard and Prusak. The research results indicated that the virtual identities of high-level mathematics students were impacted by three factors: the design of the virtual classroom, the teacher’s interactions with the student, and the personal characteristics of the student. In addition, the research results indicated that students’ identities, in terms of features and narratives, changed in the case of some students, but continued to be the same in the case of other students. The reasons behind the change or the absence of change were the three above factors and their interaction. It is concluded that the virtual course design needs to take into consideration the interaction aspect of students’ learning alongside factors that encourage their substantive learning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Enhanced Learning, Open Science and Global Education)
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