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Special Issue "Sustainable Wildlife Ecology and Conservation"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jo Anne Smith-Flueck

Laboratorio de Teriogenología, “Dr. Héctor H. Morello”, Facultad Ciencias Agrarias, Universidad Nacional de Comahue, Cinco Saltos, Río Negro, Argentina
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Phone: +54-294-4467345

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will comprise selected papers on “Sustainable Wildlife Ecology and Conservation”, including original research and reviews. At one time, the term sustainable, in the field of wildlife management, pertained simply to optimal “sustainable” harvest, based on population recruitment of a game animal, and taking into account biological and ecological factors. Today, out of necessity to protect the environment, its meaning has broadened to encompass a wider range of constituents managed through environmental, economic and social policy objectives. Given the significance of conservation biology in today’s environment as indicated by the growing number of threatened wildlife species, sustainability for wildlife biologists, scientists, and managers in current times involves comprehension of an array of integral ecological components and the mechanisms by which they function cohesively and hierarchically to maintain an ecosystem intact, while keeping manipulation of natural resources to a minimum. Topics to cover in this Special Issue might include: Case examples of practices that maintain or improve environmental quality in order to satisfy habitat and nutritional requirements of wildlife species; investigative studies evaluating the impact of human activities on macro- and micro-mineral cycles and on ecosystem biodiversity; case studies of impacts from invasive fauna and flora or wildlife poaching on native wildlife species and results obtained after control of these negative factors; evaluating the influence of climate change on wildlife species and the means by which to reduce any negative outcomes; and studies involving local community involvement to improve wildlife population numbers and biodiversity, to name a few. The role of adaptive management as a means to achieve a sustainable wildlife population makes this a challenging field of science that will continue to grow, not to mention the challenges introduced by political, cultural and biophysical barriers, including the impending shortages of cheap energy, key natural elements, and funding sources, and the ever-shrinking prime habitat leading to more fragmented wildlife populations. Contributing papers are encouraged to address their findings within the context of the projected nine billion people or more by 2050, and the continued failure to reach a steady-state human population. The objective of this Special Issue is to collectively bring under one umbrella the myriad components that interact in this diverse field of sustainable wildlife management and conservation as a means to help wildlife professionals decipher the factors that play an important role in the particular environment that they are managing.

Prof. Dr. Jo Anne Smith-Flueck
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wildlife management
  • conservation
  • sustainable management
  • biodiversity
  • population dynamics
  • nutrition
  • natural resource management
  • resource utilization
  • disturbance
  • human pressure
  • mineral cycles
  • adaptive management
  • habitat requirements
  • fragmentation
  • population size
  • climate change
  • community

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Public Assessment of Releasing a Captive Indo-Pacific Bottlenose Dolphin into the Wild in South Korea
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3199; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093199
Received: 18 May 2018 / Revised: 30 July 2018 / Accepted: 28 August 2018 / Published: 7 September 2018
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Abstract
A captive Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin named “Jedol” was released from a zoo into the wild, in Jeju Island Sea off South Korea, in July 2013 to improve his welfare. Since he was illegally captured off the coast of Juju Island in May 2009,
[...] Read more.
A captive Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin named “Jedol” was released from a zoo into the wild, in Jeju Island Sea off South Korea, in July 2013 to improve his welfare. Since he was illegally captured off the coast of Juju Island in May 2009, he had been performing in dolphin shows at Seoul Zoo, which is owned and operated by the Seoul Metropolitan Government. The release demanded considerable public expenditure, of which the source was local taxes gathered from the residents of Seoul. This paper seeks to conduct an ex-post evaluation of the release, employing the contingent valuation (CV) technique. A total of 500 households living in Seoul in 2013 participated in the CV survey to report their willingness to pay (WTP) for the release. Fifty-two percent were willing to accept an increase in local taxes over the next five years to carry out the release. The mean household WTP estimate was obtained as KRW 4880 (USD 4.56) per annum. The present values of the total WTP and the cost of the release are KRW 79.82 billion (USD 74.53 million) and KRW 751 million (USD 701,000), respectively, in 2013. Interestingly, the former is much more than the latter. We can conclude that the release was desirable from the point of view of Seoul residents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Wildlife Ecology and Conservation)
Open AccessArticle Mapping Spring Ephemeral Plants in Northern Xinjiang, China
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 804; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030804
Received: 18 October 2017 / Revised: 8 March 2018 / Accepted: 10 March 2018 / Published: 14 March 2018
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Abstract
Spring ephemeral plants (SEP) are a particular component of flora that take full advantage of water resources and temperature conditions to rapidly complete their life cycle in about two months. In China, they are mainly distributed in northern Xinjiang. They play important roles
[...] Read more.
Spring ephemeral plants (SEP) are a particular component of flora that take full advantage of water resources and temperature conditions to rapidly complete their life cycle in about two months. In China, they are mainly distributed in northern Xinjiang. They play important roles in dune stability and are precious food for the livestock and wild animals in the early spring. Northern Xinjiang is under dramatic climate changes and land-use/land-cover changes, which can affect the growth of SEP in this region. To explore how the distribution of SEP have varied under these changes, Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrodiometer (MODIS) Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) time series of two years (2000 and 2014) were applied to detect SEP in each period. The TIMESAT software was used to extract the seasonality information from the EVI data. The results show that SEP in northern Xinjiang are mainly located in the south of the Gurbantunggut desert and along the Ili Valley and piedmont hills of the mountains. In 2000, its total area was 3.83 × 104 km2, accounting for 10% of the entire region. By 2014, the total area was about 2.74 × 104 km2, with a decrease of 28.5% relative to 2000. Land-use/land-cover datasets can be used to determine whether changes in SEP over time are caused by human activities or natural factors. Combing the SEP maps with the synchronous land-use/land-cover datasets indicates that the decrease is mainly caused by natural factors, which are possibly related with the temperature and precipitation changes in this region. Human activities only contributed 4% to the decrease, with most SEP areas being replaced by croplands. The observed SEP dynamics and changes pertain only to the years with below-average precipitation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Wildlife Ecology and Conservation)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Large Wild Herbivore Populations on the Forage-Livestock Balance in the Source Region of the Yellow River
Sustainability 2018, 10(2), 340; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020340
Received: 4 December 2017 / Revised: 11 January 2018 / Accepted: 19 January 2018 / Published: 29 January 2018
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Abstract
Unmanned aerial vehicle surveys were conducted in the summer season of 2016 and the winter season of 2017 to investigate the large wild herbivore population, including kiangs, Tibetan gazelles and bharals, in Madoi County; the source region of the Yellow River. The study
[...] Read more.
Unmanned aerial vehicle surveys were conducted in the summer season of 2016 and the winter season of 2017 to investigate the large wild herbivore population, including kiangs, Tibetan gazelles and bharals, in Madoi County; the source region of the Yellow River. The study generated forage grass production data in 30 m spatial resolution in Madoi County in 2016 using a downscaling algorithm; estimated a forage-livestock balance including wild animals and domestic animals; and analyzed the effect of the large wild herbivore population on the balance between forage grass and herbivory in Madoi County. The large wild herbivore population was estimated based on the density of the animals in the survey sample strip and compared and verified with available statistical data and the two survey results from the summer season of 2016 and winter season of 2017. The results showed that: (1) in the winter season of 2017, the populations of kiang, Tibetan gazelle and bharal were 17,100, 16,000 and 9300, respectively, while the populations of domestic yak, Tibetan sheep and horse were 70,800, 102,200 and 1200, respectively. The total population of large wild herbivores and domestic animals was 475,000 (sheep units). The ratio (in sheep units) between large wild herbivores and domestic animals was 1:4.5; (2) When only considering domestic animals, the grazing pressure index was 1.13, indicating slight overloading of the grassland. When considering domestic animals and large wild herbivores (kiang, Tibetan gazelle and bharal), the grazing pressure index was 1.38, suggesting moderate overloading of the grassland; (3) If large wild herbivores are not taken into consideration when the forage-livestock balance is calculated, the grazing pressure will be under-estimated by 22%. Overgrazing is the major cause of grassland degradation in Madoi County. An additional 79,000 tons of hay or a 30% reduction in domestic animals is required to maintain a forage-livestock balance in Madoi County. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Wildlife Ecology and Conservation)
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