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Sport Psychology in Sports, Exercise and Physical Activity towards Sustainable Lifestyle and Physical Education

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Health, Well-Being and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 5505

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Thessaly, 42100 Trikala, Greece
Interests: sport psychology; physical education; performance enhancement in sport and physical education; self-regulation strategies and motivation theories

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Sport Science, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir 35100, Turkey
Interests: achievement goal theory; self-determination theory; psychological well-being
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is well known that sports and physical activity can have a profoundly positive impact on individuals’ physical and mental health. During the COVID-19 pandemic and after the lockdowns many of us are staying at home more than before, leading to a reduction in our physical activity. The purpose of This Special Issue is to examine the developmental and social aspects of activity participation in different contexts such as sport, exercise and physical education both during the initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic and in the current context. Furthermore, the effects of psychological skills, psychological techniques, and motivational theories in sports, physical activity, and physical education on different psychological aspects and performance will be examined. Submissions are encouraged from different methodological procedures (e.g., qualitative and quantitative data collection), and different forms such as commentaries, conceptual papers, and reviews are welcome.

Dr. Nikos Comoutos
Dr. Zişan Kazak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psychological techniques
  • psychological skills
  • motivation
  • personality
  • motivational climate
  • well-being
  • performance
  • sports
  • physical activity
  • physical education

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 639 KiB  
Article
The Relationships between University Students’ Physical Activity Needs, Involvement, Flow Experience and Sustainable Well-Being in the Post-Pandemic Era
by Chen Liao, Liying Nong, Yu-Feng Wu, Yu-Tai Wu and Jian-Hong Ye
Sustainability 2023, 15(11), 8719; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15118719 - 28 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2152
Abstract
As the global sustainable development agenda advances, having a healthy lifestyle has become an important part of the common pursuit. Physical activity needs and experiences are becoming increasingly diverse, yet there is a paucity of research on issues associated with university students’ physical [...] Read more.
As the global sustainable development agenda advances, having a healthy lifestyle has become an important part of the common pursuit. Physical activity needs and experiences are becoming increasingly diverse, yet there is a paucity of research on issues associated with university students’ physical activity needs, and their perceptions of their physical activity needs and sustainable well-being are not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study combines Self-Determination Theory with the existence, relatedness, and growth (ERG) Theory of Needs to explore the mediating effects of different variables on the relationship between university students’ physical activity needs and sustainable well-being. A total of 900 Chinese university students were invited through an online survey to participate in this study, and the collected data were validated with a structural equation model. According to the results of the study, it was found that the level of involvement and flow experience in university students’ sports activities have a mediating effect on the relationship between needs and sustainable well-being. Therefore, educators can enhance the level of sustainable well-being by stimulating university students’ physical activity needs and improving their level of involvement and participation experience. Full article
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13 pages, 829 KiB  
Article
Effects of a Strategic Self-Talk Intervention on Attention Functions and Performance in a Golf Task under Conditions of Ego Depletion
by Evangelos Galanis, Laur Nurkse, Jelle Kooijman, Eleftherios Papagiannis, Athanasia Karathanasi, Nikos Comoutos, Yannis Theodorakis and Antonis Hatzigeorgiadis
Sustainability 2022, 14(12), 7046; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14127046 - 9 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2173
Abstract
States of reduced self-control described as ego depletion have been shown to impair sport task performance. Recently, self-talk has emerged as a successful method to counteract ego depletion effects in cognitive tasks. Extending this line of research, the present study examined the effects [...] Read more.
States of reduced self-control described as ego depletion have been shown to impair sport task performance. Recently, self-talk has emerged as a successful method to counteract ego depletion effects in cognitive tasks. Extending this line of research, the present study examined the effects of a self-talk intervention on attention functions and performance in a golf-putting task under conditions of ego depletion. Two studies were conducted; the first involved a simple putting task, whereas in the second, a divided attention factor was introduced in addition. Participants in the first experiment were 62 sport science students (30 females and 32 males, Mage = 18.58, SD = 1.03) who were randomly assigned into experimental (n = 31) and control (n = 31) groups. Participants in the second experiment were 54 sport science students (27 females and 27 males, Mage = 19.91, SD = 1.04) who were randomly assigned into experimental (n = 27) and control (n = 27) groups. Both experiments were completed in a single session that lasted approximately 60 min. All participants were tested individually. The procedures included (a) baseline performance assessment consisting of two sets of ten putts, (b) practice period, consisting of six sets of five putts, during which the experimental group was also introduced to the use of strategic self-talk, (c) an ego-depleting task, and (d) final performance assessment, which was identical to the baseline. The results showed that in both experiments, performance of the experimental group increased from baseline to final assessment (experiment 1, p < 0.001; experiment 2, p = 0.023), whereas that of the control group had no significant change (experiment 1: p = 0.241; experiment 2: p = 0.407). The findings showed that self-talk is an effective strategy for buffering the effects of ego depletion and suggest that improved attention functions are a viable mechanism for explaining the facilitating effects of self-talk on sport performance tasks. Full article
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